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After5 May 2013

After5 May 2013

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Published by rudys_fire
After5 May 2013
After5 May 2013

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Published by: rudys_fire on May 01, 2013
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11/24/2013

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MAY 2013
AFTER5
UPPER RED RIVER VALLEYENTERTAINMENT NEWSPAPER
Boardwalk Bar & Grill
 
AFTER 5 IS OWNED BY MIKE PETERSON(701) 430-1896 - AFTER5GF@GMAIL.COM
AFTER 5 IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY AT THE BEGINNING OF EACH MONTH. AFTER 5 IS AVAILABLE FREE OFCHARGE AT DESIGNATED DISTRIBUTION OUTLETS IN NORTH DAKOTA AND MINNESOTA. ADDITIONAL ORBACK COPIES CAN BE PURCHASED FOR $5. AFTER 5 IS NOT RESPONSIBLE OR LIABLE FOR ERRORS,CHANGES OR OMISSIONS. THE ARTICLES IN AFTER 5 MAY NOT REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF THE ADVERTIS-ERS OR THE PUBLISHERS.
AFTER5GF.COM | FACEBOOK.COM/AFTER5GF
AFTER5
UPPER RED RIVER VALLEYENTERTAINMENT NEWSPAPER
ALL YOU NEED TO KNOWABOUT SUSHI
Sushi is one of the most popular and sought after dishes in Amer-ica and other western countries. Though many of us associatesushi with Japanese Cuisine it was in fact a culinary discoverymade in China. Here are some interesting facts about sushi its ori-gin and evolution!Traditional SushiIf you were eating Sushi in China in the 7th Centurythen you would have been quiet surprised when you are servedfermented fish. But that is exactly what sushi consisted during thatage. The traditional sushi consisted of fermented fish and rice.In China fish caught had to be preserved, so they werecleaned, filleted and then pressed between layers of salt for months. With time they figured that if they rolled the fish in ricethat was soaked in vinegar the fish fermented faster. They used tothrow the rice out and then eat the fish until drought and lack of food forced them to consume it all. Thus the traditional sushi was born.Modern Day SushiSushi traveled to Japan and it is here that it evolved intovarious types of sushi. The modern day Sushi was invented byHanaya Yohei in the 17th century in Tokyo. Hanaya was an inno-vative chef who took his chances with sushi that had fish that wasnot fermented. To his surprise it instantly took up the status of fastfood as it could be easily made and everyone seemed to like it.Types of SushiThere are numerous types of sushi that evolved from theoriginal Sushi. The sushi rice is common to all sushi types, it is thetype of filling, condiments, topping added and how it is presentedthat makes one Sushi different from the other.1. Nigirizushi - This sushi will have small hand clumped rice ballswith fish or shelfish on top of it. You can use tuna, shrimp, eel,squid, octopus and even fried egg2. Makizushi - This is the cylindrical rolled sushi that is createdwith the help of bamboo mat, called a makisu. The wrapping for this sushi is generally Nori or seaweed mat. You can also use thinomelette, soy paper, cucumber, or parsley.3. Gunkan Maki Sushi - This sushi is made of small cups of sushirice and dried sea wood filled with seafood like sea urchin or dif-ferent types of fish eggs.4. Temaki - Temakizushi have cones made from nori seaweedwithin which the sushi rice, seafood and vegetables will be filled.5. Oshizushi - This sushi is a pressed sushi in which the the fish is pressed into the sushi rice in a wooden box and then served.6. Inarizushi - This is a special type of Sushi where the sushi riceand seafood is filled into aburaage or deep fried tofu bags.7. Chirashizushi -This is a simple sushi preparation in whichseafood, mushroom and vegetables are spread over sushi rice.Western SushiIn America especially the sushi has been adopted andadapted and even renamed. The most importat sushi variety thatkick started most of the other adaptation is the California rollwhich consists of avocado, kani kama (imitation crab stick), andcucumber, often made with rice on the outside, nori on the inside.Some other common Western Sushi dishes are Caterpillar roll, Dy-namite roll, Rainbow roll, Spider roll, Philadelphia roll, Salmonroll, Crunchy roll and Seattle roll.Guess you know enough about sushi to make things eas-ier the next time you choose sushi for dinner or when hunting for sushi recipes, Go ahead and indulge in some sushi.
THE SECRET TOCREATING GOOD BBQ
Smoke is the ancient and time-honored way to addflavour to anything that is being cooked. In ancient times, smokewas used to preserve meat for long periods of time. It is an age-old process of cooking meats over a low smoke fire.Smoking is one of the cooking processes of barbecue.Smoking a piece of meat will require temperatures ranging from200 to 225 degrees F. Because of the temperature being so low,smoking would take long periods of time. For heavy cuts of meatslike beef or pork the cooking time will be 45 minutes to one hour.The true ingredient of smoking is the smoke. To smokesomething, all that is needed is a container to hold the smoke, asource of the smoke, and something to smoke. A smoker can beanything from a hole in the ground to a $2000 smoker.The wood for smoking meat must be selected carefully.Different woods leave different flavors. Generally, any wood thatis hard and free of resin (or sap) is good for making smoke. Woodsof fruit and nut trees are good for smoking and enhance the flavor of meats.Smoke contains nitrates which start a chemical reactionin meats that enhances the flavor and breaks down connective tis-sues like collagen and tenderizes tougher cuts for easier eating.Collagen breaks down into sugars and gellatin gives the barbecueits natural sweet flavor.The most popular items smoked are ribs, brisket and pork shoulder. But, this is not the limit. Anything can be smokedfrom nuts to cheese to steaks. However, the process of smoking isdone mainly for cuts of meat that traditionally don't come out wellin any other cooking method. A good example of this is brisket,which is very tough and is not very easy to eat if baked in an oven.When cooking meat the meat should be placed insidethe smoker so that it is surrounded by smoke. The meat should al-ways be surrounded by a thick stream of smoke to enhance the fla-vor. The smoke should be moving, and always see that the meatgets the maximum exposure to smoke.The main advantage of barbecue smoking is that it in-creases the shelf life of food, particularly meat. It evolves as the process of preserving as well as enhancing even the worst cuts of meat into a wonderful meal.A good temperature control will make the meat tender and tasty. As already mentioned smoking meat is best done in tem- peratures that range from 200 to 220 degrees. Keeping the temper-ature low will give enough time for the smoke to sink in andnaturally tenderize the meat. Slow cooking will give time for thenatural fibers in the meat to break down and become tender.The main difference between smokers and regular barbecues is thecooking time. Gas or charcoal barbecues cook food with high in-tensity heat, while a smoker barbeque cooks the food slowly. Itmay take several hours to cook a joint of meat with an electric bar- becue smoker.The last thing to remember is that smoking is an artrather than a science. Practice and patience are the secret. So untilthen keep em smokin.
A BRIEF HISTORY OF KFC
Some people might call Harland Sanders a late bloomer, but by the time he put Kentucky Fried Chicken on America's ta- bles he had already had at least a dozen careers.Born in 1890, Sanders learned to cook at age seven after his father died and his mother was forced to go to work. At ageten, young Harland got his first real job, on a nearby farm, and byfifteen he was working as a streetcar conductor. At sixteen, he joined the Army and ended up serving in Cuba.In the following decades, Sanders worked as a railroadfireman, became a lawyer and practiced law, operated a steamboaton the Ohio River, sold insurance, and, in 1930, finally settleddown to run a service station in Corbin, Kentucky. Just running aservice station was, of course, not enough for the energeticSanders, and soon he was putting his cooking skills to use again, providing meals for travelers, first in his own dining room andeventually in a restaurant across the road. Over the next few yearshe concentrated on perfecting his special recipe for fried chicken,devising the "eleven herbs and spices" of the "secret recipe" stillzealously guarded by KFC. Sanders's chicken became so popular that in 1935 he was made a Kentucky Colonel in recognition of hiscontribution to the state's cuisine.In 1950, however, a new highway bypassing the town of Corbin effectively put Sanders out of business, and his sole in-come became his $105 per month Social Security checks. Un-daunted, two years later, at age sixty-two, Sanders hit the roadwith a plan to franchise his fried chicken, for a nickel for eachchicken sold, to restaurants across the United States. Amazingly,the plan worked, and by 1964 the Colonel's chicken was beingsold in more than six hundred restaurants. At age seventy-four,Sanders sold his business for $2 million and became the officialspokesman for Kentucky Fried Chicken. By 1974, he was rankedas the second-most recognized celebrity in the world. ColonelSanders died in 1980 at the age of ninety from leukemia, but hissmiling image still graces KFC's packaging.The decision to change the name of the restaurant chainfrom Kentucky Fried Chicken to KFC in 1991 spawned a range of  bizarre rumors and urban legends, including speculation that KFCwas raising vast herds of mutant Frankenchickens in secret andthat the USDA had forbidden KFC to use the word chicken in ref-erence to the creatures. The truth was simply that the corporationwas planning to begin offering non-chicken menu items, and alsothought it wise to downplay the word fried in an increasinglyhealth-conscious marketplace.Still today, the "finger lickin' good" moniker for KFCstands as one of the most well known phrases.
Food articles this month has been provided by Articopia.com
FOOD
 
AN INTERVIEW WITHPENTATONIX
BY NICHOLAS JANES, CONTRIBUTING WRITER
After5 Contributor Nicholas Janes was able to chat with an incredi- ble and wildly popular five-vocalist a cappella group,PENTATONIX. The band won the third season of NBC's "Sing-Off"with the winning song being "Eye of the Tiger" by Survivor. Their debut album and Christmas EP have climbed to the top of the Bill- board and iTune charts. NJ: What made you decide that you wanted to be an a cappellagroup? How did you come up with the name?PE: We always loved harmonies and choir, so when the sing-off wascreated, we decided to try out for fun! I came up with the name be-cause the Pentatonic scale has 5 notes and there are 5 members of our group. Also, that scale is universal and used in many cultures.The 'X' just made it cooler ;) NJ: How did the band come together? Did you all know eachother?PE: 3 of us (Scott, Mitch & Kirstie) grew up together as we're reallyclose. We found our bass, Avi through a mutual friend, and foundKevin, our beat boxer, on YouTube! NJ: You were winners of “The Sing-Off,” what was it like being un-known to the world and immediately put on the spotlight? Werethere ever times you second-guessed your decision to audition for the show? Did you ever feel intimidated?PE: It was a whirlwind! everything happened so fast, it was hard totake a second to realize it was even happening! We are all so happythough, because being professional musicians was a dream we allhad! When we first arrived at sing-off, we were scared and intimi-dated by the giant and talented groups around, but over the weeks wegrew more confident! NJ: Did you always want to be a musician or did you have other childhood aspirations?PE: I wanted to be in music since I was 8 years old! Nothing's ever changed :) NJ: Who are your musical influences?PE: Personally, Beyoncé, John Legend, Jazmine Sullivan, JustinTimberlake, James Blake NJ: One of the best reasons I have read as to why people shouldlove you is because you take songs you like or sort of like and turnthem into great musical arrangements. How do you, as a band, de-cide what songs to cover? Afterwards, are they any songs you think will sound great and once you rehearse them your like, “ah never mind?”PE: We will do any song that we are really inspired by; We love tak-ing pop songs that everyone has heard a million times, and com- pletely changing them so people can hear a brand new take on it.Sometimes arrangements don't work, and we throw them out! NJ: For Avi. How are you able to achieve the overtones you do? Italmost sounds unnatural. Are you classically trained or was it some-thing that just came natural?PE: Accentuate the natural overtones from my voice with my tongueand lip movements. It takes a very specific placement of the tongue,almost like an embouchure of a trumpet or trombone. The lips act asthe valves or slide. Yes! I was actually an opera major before Penta-tonix and have sung in many different classical choirs over the years. NJ: For Scott, Kirstie and Mitch. You three have amazing voices.How do you keep the pipes so in tuned? I would imagine touring asmuch as you have since 2012 would put a strain on your vocal cords.PE: It definitely becomes a struggle keeping our vocals rested showafter show; We drink a lot of tea and water; we are constantly onvocal rest, and we sleep a lot! NJ: For Kristie. Not to put you on the spot but being the only girl inthe band and knowing how guys act sometimes, do you look theother four and just want to kick their butts sometimes? Or is life inthe band all fun and games?PE: Haha, I think being around the same people for a long time willhave anyone wanting to kick them at some point, but generally weall have a lot of fun together. So a combo of both I guess! But theynever do anything to ostracize me as being the only girl! NJ: For Kevin. I always viewed the cello as an underrated instru-ment. Most people want to play the guitar, bass or even violin.What made you choose the cello? On that note, how difficult is it to beatbox and play the cello at the same?PE: I never wanted to do the cello at first! I was always interested inthe saxophone! But my mom tricked me into doing it at 6 by sayingif I didn't want to do it after the first 6 months of lessons, I couldquit. I never said anything to her...and I still haven't! The combina-tion is difficult to do! It takes a lot of focus and concentration, but Ilove challenging myself! NJ: You have over 720,000 YouTube subscribers. With shows like“The Sing-Off” and sites like YouTube, do you feel you have moreof an advantage at getting your name out there to the masses com- pared to bands and musicians from say 25 years ago?PE: Absolutely! Social Media is HUGE these days and it allowsartists be able to promote themselves for nearly no cost. YouTubehas been such an awesome platform for us to stay in the spotlightand be able to share our music with the masses in a efficient way! NJ: Since September of last year, you have been on a rollercoaster ride of touring. What has your first impression so far? Is it every-thing you have ever imagined or is it more difficult then you thoughtit would be?PE: it's definitely incredibly fun and everything we'd hope it would be. It is much more difficult than I thought it would be though, be-cause a cappella is so difficult and it takes full vocal and physicalhealth to pull off. So things get tricky sometimes when a member gets fatigued or sick. We make it work though! NJ: I grew up wanting to be a filmmaker, so this really is a personalquestion for me. Your latest video for “Radioactive” is amazing. Ireally enjoyed the end of the world look and Lindsey Stirling’s violin playing put the song on a whole other level. Is this something weare going to start seeing more of? Were you the ones to come upwith the idea for the video?PE: Thank you! Fifgen films is an amaaaaazing film company thatcame up with the concept and filmed/edited the video! We lovethem. As for collabing more, we plan on doing a lot of it in the fu-ture; It allows us to create new interesting creative music and exposeone another to each other's fans! NJ: During “The Sing-Off,” you visited The Trevor Project. Everytime I turn on the television or go online, all I see is negativity.about?PE: There is a lot of negativity in the world. Bully and cyber-bully-ing are a huge issue these days (esp in the LGBT community) andwe picked to work with that charity, because we wanted to help kidsrealize that their life is worth something no matter what horriblethings people may say. We are five examples among millions that itgets better and that staying strong is key :) NJ: You’ve brought a cappella to the mainstream, what’s next for Pentatonix? Will there be a complete album of original material?PE: You bring a positive light to the world. Are they any other or-ganizations or foundations you support that you would like your fansand anyone reading this to know. We plan on creating content con-stantly, and slowly but surely transitioning to an original band! Ex- pect many EPs and full length albums in the next couple years!Thank you. That is definitely our goal with our music. We definitely plan on doing more charity work in the future, with Trevor Projectagain, and many more!
17th Annual  Cavalier
MotorcycleRide-In
CAVALIER, ND
Friday, Saturday, & Sunday  June 14, 15, & 16, 2013
Free Admission ~ Everyone Welcome!
Saturday 
@
10:00 a.m.
Fun Run Benefit
C
AVALIER
F
IRE
D
EPARTMENT
P
ANCAKE
B
REAKFAST
F
UND
-R
AISER
Sunday, June 16
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. — Cavalier Fire Hall
Saturday Only 
12 Noon to 5 p.m.
FREE
Sponsored by Cavalier Assembly of God Church 
Saturday, June 15th
Registration Starts @ 8:30 a.m.
Games Start @ 1:30 p.m. Sharp!
Friday, June 14 in the Cedar Inn Parking Lot 
Serving food @ 6:30 p.m.Music by “Flying Blind” @ 9:00 
Games
CROWD FAVORITES & NEW ADDITIONS! 
Tattoo Contest
CASH PRIZES! 
GreatSidewalk Sales
Burn-Out Contest
Food &Other VendorsDrawing for CashRafe @ 5 p.m.
LODGING AVAILABLE
Cedar Inn Motel - 1-800-338-7440;or Icelandic State Park (Camping) 265-4561Primitive Camping Available @ Cavalier City Park; CityArena; Linda Carik Residence (265-4068);or at the Pembina County Fairgrounds in Hamilton, ND(10 miles east of Cavalier - 265-8948 or 265-8844)
FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOG ON TO:
www.cavaliermotorcycleridein.com
or contact JoAnn Carik @ 265-3151
Check us out on Facebook - Cavalier Motorcycle Ride In
1st Prize$2,5002nd Prize$1,0003rd Prize$500
Free Street Dancein NAPA Lot
Dance to S.O.L. from 8:00 p.m. to Midnight 
- Inflatable Games for Kids- Popcorn- Sno-Cones- Cotton Candy- Lots of Give-Aways
PROCEEDS GO TO SUNSHINE HOSPITALITY HOME 
$10.00 Entry Fee
MAY 2013 •YEAR FIVE • NUMBER FIVE| AFTER5GF.COM •PAGE 3
MUSIC
“We want to help kids realize that their life is worth something no matter whathorrible things people may say. We arefive examples among millions that it gets better and that staying strong is key.”

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