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H Rider Haggard - She

H Rider Haggard - She

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Published by KAW
H Rider Haggard
H Rider Haggard

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of She, by H. Rider HaggardThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: SheAuthor: H. Rider HaggardRelease Date: April 4, 2006 [EBook #3155][This file last updated on July 30, 2010]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: UTF-8*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SHE ***Produced by John Bickers; Dagny; William Kyngesburye; David Widger
SHE
By H. Rider Haggard
First Published 1886.
Contents
 
IN EARTH AND SKIE AND SEASTRANGE THYNGS THER BE
[Doggerel couplet from the Sherd of Amenartas]
I inscribe this history toANDREW LANGin token of personal regardand of my sincere admirationfor his learning and his works
ORIGINAL PREPARER'S NOTEThis text was prepared from an 1888 edition published by Longmans,Green, and Co., London. A number of fragments of Greek text, andsketches, have been omitted due to the difficulty of representingthem as plain text. However, small fragments of Greek have beentranscribed in brackets "{}" using an Oxford English Dictionaryalphabet table, without diacritical marks.PREPARER'S NOTE—UNICODE EDITIONA number of fragments of Greek and other text, omitted from theoriginal posting, have been restored in this Unicode text.Sketches, however, have not yet been restored.
 
SHEINTRODUCTION
In giving to the world the record of what, looked at as an adventureonly, is I suppose one of the most wonderful and mysterious experiencesever undergone by mortal men, I feel it incumbent on me to explain whatmy exact connection with it is. And so I may as well say at once that I amnot the narrator but only the editor of this extraordinary history, and thengo on to tell how it found its way into my hands.Some years ago I, the editor, was stopping with a friend, "
vir doctissimus et amicus neus
," at a certain University, which for the purposes of this history we will call Cambridge, and was one day muchstruck with the appearance of two persons whom I saw going arm-in-armdown the street. One of these gentlemen was I think, without exception,the handsomest young fellow I have ever seen. He was very tall, very broad, and had a look of power and a grace of bearing that seemed asnative to him as it is to a wild stag. In addition his face was almost withoutflaw—a good face as well as a beautiful one, and when he lifted his hat,which he did just then to a passing lady, I saw that his head was coveredwith little golden curls growing close to the scalp."Good gracious!" I said to my friend, with whom I was walking, "why,that fellow looks like a statue of Apollo come to life. What a splendid manhe is!""Yes," he answered, "he is the handsomest man in the University, andone of the nicest too. They call him 'the Greek god'; but look at the other one, he's Vincey's (that's the god's name) guardian, and supposed to be fullof every kind of information. They call him 'Charon.'" I looked, and foundthe older man quite as interesting in his way as the glorified specimen of humanity at his side. He appeared to be about forty years of age, and was Ithink as ugly as his companion was handsome. To begin with, he wasshortish, rather bow-legged, very deep chested, and with unusually longarms. He had dark hair and small eyes, and the hair grew right down onhis forehead, and his whiskers grew right up to his hair, so that there wasuncommonly little of his countenance to be seen. Altogether he remindedme forcibly of a gorilla, and yet there was something very pleasing and

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