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1919 NGM December 1919 the Romance of Military Insignia

1919 NGM December 1919 the Romance of Military Insignia

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1919 NGM December 1919 The Romance of Military Insignia
1919 NGM December 1919 The Romance of Military Insignia

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Published by: usmf_roadrunner on May 01, 2013
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VOL.
XXXVI,
No.
6
WASHINGTON
DECEMBER,
1919
HINGTON.
D.
C.
THE
ROMANCE
OF
MILITARY
INSIGNIA
How
the
United
States
Government
Recognizes
Deeds
of
Heroismand
Devotion
to
Duty
(The
numbers
in
parentheses
appearing
in
thetext
refer
to
the
corresponding
descriptive
paragraphs
and
illustrationsin
color,
pages
502
to
526}
BY
COL.
ROBERT
E.
WYLLIE,
GENERAL
STAFF,
U.
S.
A.
THE
United
States
has
ever
been
a
peace-loving
nation,
concerned
with
the
industries
and
arts
of
peace
and
giving
scant
attention
to
any-
thing
military.
To
the
great
bulk
of
the
present
gen-
eration
a
soldier
in
uniform
was
a
rara
avis
something
to
be
looked
at
in
astonishment
when
seen
;
so
that,
even
in
garrison
towns,
it
is
not
surprising
that
the
soldier
preferred
to
resort
to
the
camouflage
of
civilian
clothes
when
go-
ing
on
pass.
But
now,
participation
in
the
great
World
War
has
carriedthe
Army
into
every
home
in
the
country;
the
uniform
is
no
longer
unfamiliar;
it
is
everywhere,
and
there
is
not
a
family
whose
members
cannotspeak
with
pride
of
their
boy
who
served
Uncle
Sam
in
thegreat
emergency.
This
feeling
of
personal
relationship
to
themilitary
services
carries
with
it
the
desire
for
information,
and
that
is
not
always
so
easy
to
obtain.
Four
and
a
half
million
Americans
are
now
en-
titled
to
the
Victory
Medal;
yet
how
many
fully
comprehend
just
what
that
medal
is,
or
what
is
meant
by
the
bit
of
rainbow
ribbon
covered
with
stars
that
Jack
wears
so
proudly?
And
that
Dis-
tinguished
Service
Cross
that
Bill
has
!
What
relationship
does
that
bear
to
the
Victory
Medal,
or
to
the
Croix
de
Guerre
that
Sam
sports?
And
then
the
shoulder
insignia
!
More
than
2,0*00,000
men
in
uniform
worethem
designs
in
all
patterns
and
colors.
What
was
their
origin
?
Why
were
they
worn
?
What
do
they
all
mean,
anyhow
?
These
are
now
subjects
of
interest
in
American
homes.
The
previous
indiffer-
ence
has
been
replaced
by
a
thirst
for
information,
due
to
the
personal
touch
that
each
family
now
haswith
the
Army
and
Navy,
and
it
furnishes
the
excuse
for
what
is
to
follow.
If
you
insist
that
you
arenot
interested,
in
spite
of
the
above
assertions
to
the
contrary,
skip
the
reading
matter
and
confine
your
at-
tention
to
the
illustrations,
for
you
can-not
resist
the
reproductions
ofthe
Beck
Engraving
Company.
THE;
ORIGIN
OF
MEDALS
The
origin
of
medals
and
other
simi-
lar
decorations
is
lost
in
the
mists
of
an-
tiquity.
Probably
the
earliest
historical
record
was
the
award
made
by
an
Em-
peror
of
China,
in
the
first
century
oftheChristian
era,
tohis
military
commanders.
 
THE
NATIONAL
GEOGRAPHIC
MAGAZINE
=^
.
\
-^
*
^-
THE
VICTORY
MEDAL
WHICH
WILL
BE
GIVENTO
4,5OO,OOO
AMERICANS
The
large
disc
is
the
obverse
of
the
medal,
showing
a
winged
Victory;
the
smaller
shows
the
reverse
with
the
names
ofthosenations
which
actually
took
part
in
hostile
operations
against
the
Central
Powers.
The
medal
was
designed
by
J.
E.
Fraser
tinder
the
direction
of
the
Commission
of
Fine
Arts
(see
text,
pages
499
and
507).
During
the
Middle
Ages
various
or-
dersof
knighthood
flourished,
and
the
members
were
distinguished
by
insignia
worn
to
denote
the
order
to
which
the
individual
belonged,
as
well
as
the
posi-
tion
of
influence
and
honor
attained;
but
these
corresponded
more
nearly
to
the
modern
insignia
of
rank
and
arm
of
serv-
ice
than
to
medals
given
for
services
rendered
by
the
recipient.
\Ye
must
advance
our
historicalre-
search
to
the
time
of
Queen
Elizabeth
to
find
the
beginning
of
our
modern
system
of
medals,
and,
inasmuch
as
the
develop-
ment
canbe
traced
more
easily
in
Eng-
land
than
elsewhere,
a
survey
ofthe
growth
of
the
British
system
will
be
given.
In
1588
Queen
Elizabeth
issued
a
medal
commonly
known
as
the
"Ark
in
Flood"on
account
of
the
design
of
the
reverse,
which
shows
an
ark
floating
on
the
waves.
It
is
uncertain
for
what
particu-
lar
service
this
medal
was
awarded,
but
asthat
was
the
year
ofthe
destruction
of
the
Great
Armada,
and
this
was
a
naval
medal,
it
is
not
unreasonable
to
suppose
that
it
commemorated
thatevent.
Some
ofthese
medals
were
in
gold
and
some
in
silver,
and
they
were
provided
with
a
ring
for
suspension,
so
were
evidently
intended
to
be
worn.
Two
other
medals
were
struck
in
the
same
reign
to
commemorate
the
victory
over
Spain,
but
we
have
no
information
as
to
the
recipients
of
any
ofthese
three.
Elizabeth's
successor,
James
I,
awarded
a
medal
to
his
distinguished
naval
com-
manders,
and
the
unfortunate
Charles
I
 
EVERY
AMERICAN
WOUNDED
IN
BATTLE)
DURING
THE
WORLD
WAR
IS
TO
THIS
TESTIMONIAL,SIGNED
BY
THE
COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF
OF
THE
ARMY
AND
NAVY
This
handsome
certificate,
in
black
and
white,
designed
by
E.
H.
Blashfield,
showsColumbia
bestowing
a
new
order
of
knighthood
upon
one
who
has
sacrificed
his
blood
for
humanity.
It
is
hoped
that
the
certificates
will
be
ready,
for
distribution
in
December,
1919.
The
same
design
of
certificate
with
appropriate
change
of
wording
will
be
presented
to
the
next
of
kincf
all
those
who
died
in
the
service.
465

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