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Turn, Turn, Turn

Turn, Turn, Turn

Ratings: (0)|Views: 112|Likes:
Published by Ken1White
"We won't survive if we don't start taking care of each other. And I’ll stake my life on it if things don’t change." That's the message of John Willoughby, "The Gray Champion," as promoted by Anne Mitchell, a Sacramento radio reporter who's looking for a horse to ride to save her job after D.B. Norton, media magnate, acquires her radio station and fires everyone who isn't producing enough "fireworks."

Anne writes a series of reports on the Gray Champion that turns Willoughby into a populist hero; the enemy of all the evils in the modern world: the greed, lust, hate, fear, and inhumanity. Her reports strike a nerve. The public response is enormous. It even gets the attention of powerful people like D.B. Norton.

Against his better judgment, Willoughby becomes the spokesperson for "The Fourth Turning" Movement – named after a prophesized cyclical, historical moment of crisis, danger, and opportunity.

When Norton proposes to support the movement on a national scale, Willoughby initially refuses. However, when faced with the hope, optimism, and true belief generated by his message in the common people, he reconsiders. Then, while stumping across the country, Willoughby and Anne discover the true nature of Norton's generous philanthropy. He intends to use The Gray Champion and The Fourth Turning to further his own political ambitions and agenda.

Willoughby threatens to expose Norton and the entire movement at a massive national rally to be held on the Sunday before Christmas. But, Norton is too good at what he does. At the rally, he discredits and shames Willoughby in front of millions. And Willoughby disappears.

In one of her first radio reports, Anne wrote that The Gray Champion – in protest and disillusioned by the state of things – promised to jump from the top of the Tower Bridge into the Sacramento River on Christmas Eve if nothing changed.
"We won't survive if we don't start taking care of each other. And I’ll stake my life on it if things don’t change." That's the message of John Willoughby, "The Gray Champion," as promoted by Anne Mitchell, a Sacramento radio reporter who's looking for a horse to ride to save her job after D.B. Norton, media magnate, acquires her radio station and fires everyone who isn't producing enough "fireworks."

Anne writes a series of reports on the Gray Champion that turns Willoughby into a populist hero; the enemy of all the evils in the modern world: the greed, lust, hate, fear, and inhumanity. Her reports strike a nerve. The public response is enormous. It even gets the attention of powerful people like D.B. Norton.

Against his better judgment, Willoughby becomes the spokesperson for "The Fourth Turning" Movement – named after a prophesized cyclical, historical moment of crisis, danger, and opportunity.

When Norton proposes to support the movement on a national scale, Willoughby initially refuses. However, when faced with the hope, optimism, and true belief generated by his message in the common people, he reconsiders. Then, while stumping across the country, Willoughby and Anne discover the true nature of Norton's generous philanthropy. He intends to use The Gray Champion and The Fourth Turning to further his own political ambitions and agenda.

Willoughby threatens to expose Norton and the entire movement at a massive national rally to be held on the Sunday before Christmas. But, Norton is too good at what he does. At the rally, he discredits and shames Willoughby in front of millions. And Willoughby disappears.

In one of her first radio reports, Anne wrote that The Gray Champion – in protest and disillusioned by the state of things – promised to jump from the top of the Tower Bridge into the Sacramento River on Christmas Eve if nothing changed.

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Published by: Ken1White on Apr 02, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/01/2012

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 TURN, TURN, TURNbyKenneth Whitebased on the screenplay"Meet John Doe"byRobert Riskinadapted from the story"The Life of John Doe"byRichard Connell and Robert PresnellKenneth White1108 Wellesley AvenueModesto, CA 95350-5044(209) 567-0600Ken1White@aol.com
 
 1FADE IN:EXT. SACRAMENTO - SKYLINE - AFTERNOONOffice buildings poke through the blanket of winter fog.Each is topped by a lighted holiday decoration—star, wreath,tree, bell.EXT. SACRAMENTO - OFFICE BUILDING - AFTERNOON A neon sign at the top sizzles against the mist. It reads:"KSAC – The Voice of the Valley." Below it, a smaller, neonsign reads: "An AOL Time Warner Company." A polyethylene banner unfurls, cascading down to cover thesmaller neon sign. The new banner reads: "SYNAPSECORPORATION – Media for Life. A Wholly-Owned Subsidiary ofthe D.B. Norton Group."INT. KSAC – OUTER OFFICE - AFTERNOONIt's surprisingly quiet for the middle of the work day. EMPLOYEEStry to work in their cubicles, but spend as much time lookingaround the office as they do working.INT. CONNELL'S OFFICE - AFTERNOON ANN MILLER stands, arms crossed, staring hard across the desk atHENRY CONNELL, a no-nonsense, veteran of the business. Connelltakes a sip from a glass of milk.CONNELLFireworks. ANNFireworks.CONNELLD.B. Norton owns this station now. Hewants fireworks. ANNNo fireworks, no job, is that it?CONNELLIt's all about ad revenue, Mitchell. Nolisteners, no ads—no ads, no revenue.No fireworks, no listeners. ANNI'm a good reporter, Mr. Connell. Youhaven't been around here long enough toknow that.
 
 2CONNELLD.B. says you're too soft, your storiestoo tame. Pablum. ANNLook, I need this job. I've got amother and two kid sisters to support.CONNELLIt's tough out there for everyone. ANNHow would you know?Connell shoots her an irritated look. ANNI'm not giving up. Not without a fight.CONNELLI was sent here to clear out thedeadwood. Your stories aren't what ourlisteners want. It's that simple. ANNI'll take a pay cut.Connell gives her a look that says, "Your pay cut wouldn'tamount to a pimple on D.B. Norton's butt."CONNELLWe need stories that stir things up.Get people excited. Start arguments.Get people talking. ANNI can do that. I know this town, itspeople. Just give me a shot.Someone knocks on the office door.CONNELLCome in.Two MEN and a WOMAN enter. They all look pale, scared.Realizing there's nothing else she can say, Ann turns toleave.CONNELL Ann.(Ann stops, hopeful)You owe me a story. Get it on the airand you get your last check. Ann's eyes flash angrily as she leaves.

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