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Copyleft Letter to Obama.4.2.09

Copyleft Letter to Obama.4.2.09

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Published by Ben Sheffner
Letter to Obama re IP appointments from American Association of Law Libraries, American Library Association, Association of Research Libraries, Center for Democracy and Technology, Computer and Communications Industry Association, Consumer Electronics Association, Consumers Union, EDUCAUSE, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Entertainment Consumers Association, Essential Action, Home Recording Rights Coalition, Internet Archive, Knowledge Ecology International, NetCoalition, Public Knowledge, Special Libraries Association. U.S. Public Interest Research Group, Wikimedia Foundation.
Letter to Obama re IP appointments from American Association of Law Libraries, American Library Association, Association of Research Libraries, Center for Democracy and Technology, Computer and Communications Industry Association, Consumer Electronics Association, Consumers Union, EDUCAUSE, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Entertainment Consumers Association, Essential Action, Home Recording Rights Coalition, Internet Archive, Knowledge Ecology International, NetCoalition, Public Knowledge, Special Libraries Association. U.S. Public Interest Research Group, Wikimedia Foundation.

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Published by: Ben Sheffner on Apr 03, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/10/2014

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 April 2, 2009The Honorable Barack ObamaOffice of the PresidentThe White House1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.Washington, DC 20500Dear Mr. President:The undersigned public interest groups, library associations, and tradeassociations representing the technology, consumer electronics, and telecommunicationsindustries write to ask that your future appointments to intellectual property (IP) policypositions reflect the diversity of stakeholders affected by IP policy, and that youradministration create offices devoted to promoting innovation and free expression withinthe relevant agencies.The Supreme Court in
Sony v. Universal
(1984) recognized that copyright lawmust achieve a “difficult balance between the interests of authors… in the control andexploitation of their writings… and society’s competing interest in the free flow of ideas,information, and commerce….” In
 MGM v. Grokster 
(2005), the Court stated that “[t]hemore artistic protection is favored, the more technological innovation may bediscouraged; the administration of copyright law is an exercise in managing the trade-off.” You also acknowledged this balance in your Technology Agenda, stating that wemust not only protect IP, but also “update and reform our copyright and patent systems topromote civic discourse, innovation, and investment….”To date, several of your appointees to positions that oversee the formulation andimplementation of IP policy have, immediately prior to their appointments, representedthe concentrated copyright industries. For example, two of the most senior officials in theDepartment of Justice represented the recording industry in litigation for many years. Thefact that these individuals were litigators rather than registered lobbyists does notdiminish the possibility that they may be inclined favorably towards the positions of theindustries they long represented. Recent developments like the Justice Department'sintervention in
Sony BMG v. Tenenbaum
in favor of the plaintiff record label heightenthese concerns.Many positions with IP policy responsibilities remain to be filled at the Patent andTrademark Office (PTO), the United States Trade Representative (USTR), and theDepartment of State. In selecting these officials, we ask you to consider that individualswho support overly broad IP protection might favor established distribution models at theexpense of technological innovators, creative artists, writers, musicians, filmmakers, andan increasingly participatory public. Overzealous expansion and enforcement of copyright, for example, can quash innovative information technologies, the developmentand marketing of new and useful devices, and the creation of new works, as well asprohibit the public from accessing and using its cultural heritage.

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