Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
14Activity

Table Of Contents

Background and Methodology
Formation of the Global Intelligence Working Group
GIWG’s Mission and Vision
Building on Existing Information
Recognition of Needs
Data Warehouse
Data Mart
“Pointer” Systems
Recommendations for Implementation of the Plan
Appendix A: Glossary
Appendix B: Acronyms
Appendix C: Sources
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan

National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,097|Likes:
Published by Blue
The Homeland Security Department must do more to coordinate and fund a national data sharing network that allows states to communicate and exchange information collected on terrorist and crime activities, officials from state and local law enforcement and intelligence agencies told the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing and Terrorism Risk Assessment on Wednesday [April 1, 2009].

Fusion centers, which almost every state has created, should be able to more easily share with one another the information on terrorist threats they collect from diverse sources such as criminal investigations, media reports and tips from the public, said officials from centers in Los Angeles, Iowa and Texas. While centers consolidate data to identify potential threats in their area and share information with DHS, they don't have any means of collaborating with other centers nationwide to identify trends or to plan a more comprehensive response to far-reaching threats. . . . Russell Porter, director of the Iowa Intelligence Fusion Center, said a key ingredient in that objective is the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan, which was developed in 2005 by the Justice Department in cooperation with local, state and tribal law enforcement officials. The plan outlines steps that any law enforcement agency can take to advance intelligence sharing. But the vision behind the plan and its recommendations requires funding. "Fusion centers need to have sustainable funding from the fed government," Baca said. "We can't do this on local dollars alone."
The Homeland Security Department must do more to coordinate and fund a national data sharing network that allows states to communicate and exchange information collected on terrorist and crime activities, officials from state and local law enforcement and intelligence agencies told the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing and Terrorism Risk Assessment on Wednesday [April 1, 2009].

Fusion centers, which almost every state has created, should be able to more easily share with one another the information on terrorist threats they collect from diverse sources such as criminal investigations, media reports and tips from the public, said officials from centers in Los Angeles, Iowa and Texas. While centers consolidate data to identify potential threats in their area and share information with DHS, they don't have any means of collaborating with other centers nationwide to identify trends or to plan a more comprehensive response to far-reaching threats. . . . Russell Porter, director of the Iowa Intelligence Fusion Center, said a key ingredient in that objective is the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan, which was developed in 2005 by the Justice Department in cooperation with local, state and tribal law enforcement officials. The plan outlines steps that any law enforcement agency can take to advance intelligence sharing. But the vision behind the plan and its recommendations requires funding. "Fusion centers need to have sustainable funding from the fed government," Baca said. "We can't do this on local dollars alone."

More info:

Published by: Blue on Apr 03, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/19/2013

pdf

text

original

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 6 to 56 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (14)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
takashiro liked this
Hussen Weli liked this
nonono2451 liked this
Paseedy Badjie liked this
riffdog liked this
mchrestos liked this
valericaputamica liked this
Oxony20 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->