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Table Of Contents

CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII
CHAPTER XIII
CHAPTER XIV
CHAPTER XV
CHAPTER XVI
CHAPTER XVII
CHAPTER XVIII
CHAPTER XIX
CHAPTER XX
CHAPTER XXI
CHAPTER XXII
CHAPTER XXIII
CHAPTER XXIV
CHAPTER XXV
CHAPTER XXVI
CHAPTER XXVII
CHAPTER XXVIII
CHAPTER XXIX
CHAPTER XXX
CHAPTER XXXI
CHAPTER XXXII
CHAPTER XXXIII
CHAPTER XXXIV
CHAPTER XXXV
CHAPTER XXXVI
CHAPTER XXXVII
CHAPTER XXXVIII
CHAPTER XXXIX
CHAPTER XL
CHAPTER XLI
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Life of Abraham Lincoln Author: Henry Ketcham Release Date: November, 2004]

Life of Abraham Lincoln Author: Henry Ketcham Release Date: November, 2004]

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2 |Likes:
Published by Chivu Vlad-Bogdan
THE LIFE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
BY HENRY KETCHAM
\CONTENTS.
I. The Wild West
II. The Lincoln Family
III. Early Years
IV. In Indiana
V. Second Journey to New Orleans
VI. Desultory Employments
VII. Entering Politics
VIII. Entering the Law
IX. On the Circuit
X. Social Life and Marriage
XI. The Encroachments of Slavery
XII. The Awakening of the Lion
XIII. Two Things that Lincoln Missed
XIV. Birth of the Republican Party
XV. The Battle of the Giants
XVI. Growing Audacity of the Slave Power
XVII. The Backwoodsman at the Center of Eastern Culture
XVIII. The Nomination of 1860
XIX. The Election
XX. Four Long Months
XXI. Journey to Washington
XXII. The Inauguration
XXIII. Lincoln his Own President
XXIV. Fort Sumter
XXV. The Outburst of Patriotism
XXVI. The War Here to Stay
XXVII. The Darkest Hour of the War
XXVIII. Lincoln and Fremont
XXIX. Lincoln and McClellan
XXX. Lincoln and Greeley
XXXI. Emancipation
XXXII. Discouragements
XXXIII. New Hopes
XXXIV. Lincoln and Grant
XXXV. Literary Characteristics
XXXVI. Second Election
XXXVII. Close of the War
XXXVIII. Assassination
XXXIX. A Nation's Sorrow
XL. The Measure of a Man
XLI. Testimonies

CHAPTER XXXIII.
NEW HOPES.
The outlook from Washington during the first half of the year 1863 was
as discouraging as could well be borne. There had been no real advance
since the beginning of the war. Young men, loyal and enthusiastic, had
gone into the army by hundreds of thousands. Large numbers of these,
the flower of the northern youth, had been slain or wounded, and far
larger numbers had died of exposure in the swamps of Virginia. There
was still no progress. Washington had been defended, but there was
hardly a day when the Confederates were not within menacing distance of
the capital.
After the bloody disaster at Chancellorsville matters grew even worse.
Lee first defeated Hooker in battle and then he out-maneuvered him. He
cleverly eluded him, and before Hooker was aware of what was going on,
he was on his way, with eighty thousand men, towards Philadelphia and
had nearly a week's start of the Union army. The Confederates had
always thought that if they could carry the war into the northern
states they would fight to better advantage. Jeff Davis had threatened
the torch, but it is not likely that such subordinates as General Lee
shared his destructive and barbarous ambition. Still, Lee had a
magnificent army, and its presence in Pennsylvania was fitted to
inspire terror. It was also fitted to rouse the martial spirit of the
northern soldiers, as afterwards appeared.
As soon as the situation was known, Hooker started in hot pursuit.
After he had crossed the Potomac going north, he made certain requests
of the War Department which were refused, and he, angry at the refusal,
promptly sent in his resignation. Whether his requests were reasonable
is one question; whether it was patriotic in him to resign on the eve
of what was certain to be a great and decisive battle is another
question. But his resignation was accepted and Meade was appointed to
the command. He accepted the responsibility with a modest and soldierly
spirit and quit himself like a man. It is one of the rare cases in all
history in which an army has on the eve of battle made a change of
generals without disaster. That is surely highly to the credit of
General Meade. Lee's objective point was not known. He might capture
Harrisburg or Philadelphia, or both. He would probably desire to cut
off all communication with Washington. The only thing to do was to
overtake him and force a battle. He himself realized this and was fully
decided not to give battle but fight only on the defensive. Curiously
enough, Meade also decided not to attack, but to fight on the
defensive. Nevertheless, "the best laid schemes o' mice an' men gang
aft agley."
The result was Gettysburg, and the battle was not fought in accordance
with the plan of either commander. Uncontrollable
THE LIFE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
BY HENRY KETCHAM
\CONTENTS.
I. The Wild West
II. The Lincoln Family
III. Early Years
IV. In Indiana
V. Second Journey to New Orleans
VI. Desultory Employments
VII. Entering Politics
VIII. Entering the Law
IX. On the Circuit
X. Social Life and Marriage
XI. The Encroachments of Slavery
XII. The Awakening of the Lion
XIII. Two Things that Lincoln Missed
XIV. Birth of the Republican Party
XV. The Battle of the Giants
XVI. Growing Audacity of the Slave Power
XVII. The Backwoodsman at the Center of Eastern Culture
XVIII. The Nomination of 1860
XIX. The Election
XX. Four Long Months
XXI. Journey to Washington
XXII. The Inauguration
XXIII. Lincoln his Own President
XXIV. Fort Sumter
XXV. The Outburst of Patriotism
XXVI. The War Here to Stay
XXVII. The Darkest Hour of the War
XXVIII. Lincoln and Fremont
XXIX. Lincoln and McClellan
XXX. Lincoln and Greeley
XXXI. Emancipation
XXXII. Discouragements
XXXIII. New Hopes
XXXIV. Lincoln and Grant
XXXV. Literary Characteristics
XXXVI. Second Election
XXXVII. Close of the War
XXXVIII. Assassination
XXXIX. A Nation's Sorrow
XL. The Measure of a Man
XLI. Testimonies

CHAPTER XXXIII.
NEW HOPES.
The outlook from Washington during the first half of the year 1863 was
as discouraging as could well be borne. There had been no real advance
since the beginning of the war. Young men, loyal and enthusiastic, had
gone into the army by hundreds of thousands. Large numbers of these,
the flower of the northern youth, had been slain or wounded, and far
larger numbers had died of exposure in the swamps of Virginia. There
was still no progress. Washington had been defended, but there was
hardly a day when the Confederates were not within menacing distance of
the capital.
After the bloody disaster at Chancellorsville matters grew even worse.
Lee first defeated Hooker in battle and then he out-maneuvered him. He
cleverly eluded him, and before Hooker was aware of what was going on,
he was on his way, with eighty thousand men, towards Philadelphia and
had nearly a week's start of the Union army. The Confederates had
always thought that if they could carry the war into the northern
states they would fight to better advantage. Jeff Davis had threatened
the torch, but it is not likely that such subordinates as General Lee
shared his destructive and barbarous ambition. Still, Lee had a
magnificent army, and its presence in Pennsylvania was fitted to
inspire terror. It was also fitted to rouse the martial spirit of the
northern soldiers, as afterwards appeared.
As soon as the situation was known, Hooker started in hot pursuit.
After he had crossed the Potomac going north, he made certain requests
of the War Department which were refused, and he, angry at the refusal,
promptly sent in his resignation. Whether his requests were reasonable
is one question; whether it was patriotic in him to resign on the eve
of what was certain to be a great and decisive battle is another
question. But his resignation was accepted and Meade was appointed to
the command. He accepted the responsibility with a modest and soldierly
spirit and quit himself like a man. It is one of the rare cases in all
history in which an army has on the eve of battle made a change of
generals without disaster. That is surely highly to the credit of
General Meade. Lee's objective point was not known. He might capture
Harrisburg or Philadelphia, or both. He would probably desire to cut
off all communication with Washington. The only thing to do was to
overtake him and force a battle. He himself realized this and was fully
decided not to give battle but fight only on the defensive. Curiously
enough, Meade also decided not to attack, but to fight on the
defensive. Nevertheless, "the best laid schemes o' mice an' men gang
aft agley."
The result was Gettysburg, and the battle was not fought in accordance
with the plan of either commander. Uncontrollable

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Published by: Chivu Vlad-Bogdan on May 06, 2013
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