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Have You Filled a Bucket?

Have You Filled a Bucket?

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Published by Morgan Bayda
A lesson plan for grade one developed around the book resource: Have You Filled A Bucket Today? by Carol McCloud, illustrated by David Messing. Students learn about self-esteem and healthy relationships, then create and carry out an action plan to help them become "bucket fillers".
A lesson plan for grade one developed around the book resource: Have You Filled A Bucket Today? by Carol McCloud, illustrated by David Messing. Students learn about self-esteem and healthy relationships, then create and carry out an action plan to help them become "bucket fillers".

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Published by: Morgan Bayda on Apr 06, 2009
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07/06/2013

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Lesson PlanSubject:
Health
Grade:
One
Content (Topic):
 
Have You Filled a Bucket Today?
 
Strand: Social RelationshipsTopics: Making Friends, Family Relationships, Relationships in theClassroomConcepts: Indentifying and Expressing Feelings, Sharing, Making it aGood Place for Learning 
 
Foundational Objectives:
 
Students will develop habitsnecessary for healthy living.(PSVS)
 
 
Students will better understand theelements of social and emotionalwell-being (PSVS)
 
 
Students will treat themselves andothers with respect (PSVS)
 Learning Objectives:
Students Will:
 
Value themselves as individuals
 
Value friendship
 
Work toward improving their self-esteem
 
Recognize the need for healthy personal relationships withmembers of their family, friendsand others in the community
 
Gradually incorporate thevocabulary for expressing feelingsand for social interaction into their talk and writing (C)
 
Develop their interpersonal skills
Assessment:
 
Contribution to suggestion box for “fill a bucket” ideas
 
Creation and carrying out of action plan
Common Essential Learnings (CELs):
 
 
Communication
 
Personal and Social Values and Skills
 
Critical and Creative Thinking
 
Independent Learning
Prerequisite Learning:
 
 
Our actions and words effect others
 
Some actions and words make us feel bad. Other actions and words make us feelgood.
Major Resources:
Have You Filled a Bucket Today? book by Carol McCloud, illus.David Messing, Teacher Tube video “Have you Filled a Bucket Today” by AngieWellock 
 
Lesson PreparationEquipment/materials:
 
Have you Filled a Bucket Today by Carol McCloud, illus. David Messing
 
Bucket for demonstration
 
Colourful objects to fill the bucket with (Ex. colourful balls)
 
Lg. bucket picture chart, divided into small gridded squares
 
“The Life of a Bucket Filler” journal for ea. student
Advanced Preparation:
N/A
Presentation **This lesson may be done over a couple of days, and the closure/assessmentwill be continuous, daily procedures**Set:
 
Tell students that today we are going to continue on talking about how we can make our classroom space a nice place to be. We are not just talking about in the classroom,though. We can make every space that we are in a nice place to be. At home, at school,on the playground, and anywhere else we can make ourselves and others feel good.
 
We are going to use this book, called Have You Filled a Bucket Today? to help us starttalking about how we can feel good, and how we can make others around us feel good,too.
 
Read Have You Filled a Bucket Today? by Carol McCloud, illus. David Messing.
 
During the story:
o
 
Page 9: Ask students to imagine their invisible bucket. They can even imaginethey are holding it right now. Ask them to think about times when they have felthappy. Those times are when their bucket is full. Ask them to think about timeswhen they have felt sad and lonely. Thos times are when their bucket is empty.
o
 
Page 13: Ask students to give you ideas about how to be a bucket filler.
o
 
Page 15: Ask students to give you ideas about how to be a bucket dipper. Ask if their bucket has ever been dipped into. Ask if they have ever dipped intosomeone else’s bucket.
o
 
Page 19: Ask students to think of something they could say to someone in their family to fill their bucket.
Development:
 
Ask students if they liked that story. Ask them if they think it could be true: doeseveryone really carry around an invisible bucket?
 
Bring out a bucket. Even though this bucket is not invisible, we will use it to see whathappens when we do or say nice or mean things to each other.
 
Hand out colourful balls to students. These balls represent the good thoughts that canfill up the bucket. Ask students to think of something they could say to me (the teacher)to help fill up my bucket. As each student answers, they can place their ball in the bucket, helping to fill it up. The teacher should model how they start to feel happier andhappier and better and better as the bucket gets fuller.
 
About half way through the class, ask students to think of something that they could sayor do to me (the teacher) that would make me feel bad. When a student gives an answer,spill some of the balls from the bucket. Model how sad you feel. Ask students whatthey could do to make me feel better.
 
Students will need to think of more ways to help fill the bucket back up.
 
Closure:
 
**Depending on time allowances, this might be done the following day
 
Tell students that we are going to start a class project to see if each of us can fill a bucket each day.
 
Lets start by thinking of some ideas. What are things you can do for someone or say to someone to fill up their bucket?
 
Label the bucket used for the demonstration as the “Bucket Filling Ideas” bucket.
 
Students will write down their ideas on small strips of paper and fold them in half, placing them in the bucket. They do not have to write their name on the paper.
 
Start a class chart: Bucket Fillers/Bucket Dippers
 
Pull ideas from the “Bucket Filling Ideas” bucket and write student answers under the “Bucket Fillers” heading.
 
Have a discussion about what “Bucket Dippers” do. Add these ideas to the chart.
 
Tell students that if they are ever stuck and can’t figure out what they could do tofill someone’s bucket, they can pull out an idea from the “Bucket Filling Ideas” bucket, read it, and then put it back for someone else to read later. They can usethe idea from the bucket to help them think of how to fill someone else’s bucket.
 
Show students the Lg. bucket picture chart divided into gridded squares. Tellstudents that this is how we will keep track of our progress as a class.
 
At the end of each day, you will use this journal called “The Life of a BucketFiller” to check if you have done something to fill a bucket each day. Showstudents the journal and read a sample page. At the end of each day (perhaps atagenda time) we will write in our journal. We will write the date first. Then wewill answer the question: “Did I fill a bucket today?”. You will write how youdid it (or draw a picture). You can also colour in the bucket on the page to showhow your bucket feels that day. If you are feeling sad or hurt, maybe you willcolour your bucket so that it is not very full. If you are feeling happy, you cancolour your bucket so that it is fuller. You can use this colouring bucket to showhow you are feeling.
 
Each day, if you answered “yes” to the question, “did I fill a bucket today?”, youcan colour in one of the squares on our bucket chart. Lets see how fast we, as aclass, can fill up our whole class bucket.
 
It is important to be honest. If you did something to dip into someone’s buckettoday, should you lie and say that you didn’t? No. We are working on becoming bucket fillers! It is okay to make mistakes sometimes.
 
Remember, if you are having trouble thinking of a bucket filling idea, read an ideafrom our “bucket filling ideas” bucket.
 
Students will receive “The Life of a Bucket Filler” journal to keep in their desk.
 
From now on, if a student exhibits bucket-dipping behaviour, they will have todraw a picture of the behaviour (and staple it into their journal?).
 
If you bucket is feeling kind of empty, who could you come to for help?
Extensions:
Make time for students to fill out their journals each day. Use bucket-fillingand bucket-dipping language when dealing with positive or negative social scenarios.Students will be using bucket-filling behaviour if they work to keep the promise theymade to the class for the “Pebbles of Promise” lesson. As the bucket chart gets fuller and

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