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CWIHP Bulletin 17/18: The Global Cuban Missile Crisis at 50

CWIHP Bulletin 17/18: The Global Cuban Missile Crisis at 50

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Published by The Wilson Center
Timed for publication on the 50th anniversary of this most dangerous Cold War crisis this October, this issue continues the Project’s mission to enrich scholarship and public policy debate through new archival evidence from inaccessible (or less easily accessible) archives around the world. Containing over 500 newly declassified and translated documents from international sources, this issue is the most extensive collection ever presented of original, never-before published, non-US primary sources on the Crisis. Highlights include:

– When Che Met Mao – The first encounter of two great revolutionary icons
– The View from Havana – New translations give glimpses behind the “sugarcane curtain”
– Anastas Mikoyan's "Mission Impossible" – The Soviets’ “hidden crisis,” convincing Fidel Castro to relinquish the missiles
– Khrushchev Unplugged – Candid comments from the Soviet leader only days after the crisis’ resolution
– Would-Be Mediators? – Interventions and secret diplomatic channels via Brazil, Poland, and the Netherlands
– Post-Crisis Cuba and the Soviet Bloc – Raul Castro in Eastern Europe and Aleksei Kosygin in Havana.
Timed for publication on the 50th anniversary of this most dangerous Cold War crisis this October, this issue continues the Project’s mission to enrich scholarship and public policy debate through new archival evidence from inaccessible (or less easily accessible) archives around the world. Containing over 500 newly declassified and translated documents from international sources, this issue is the most extensive collection ever presented of original, never-before published, non-US primary sources on the Crisis. Highlights include:

– When Che Met Mao – The first encounter of two great revolutionary icons
– The View from Havana – New translations give glimpses behind the “sugarcane curtain”
– Anastas Mikoyan's "Mission Impossible" – The Soviets’ “hidden crisis,” convincing Fidel Castro to relinquish the missiles
– Khrushchev Unplugged – Candid comments from the Soviet leader only days after the crisis’ resolution
– Would-Be Mediators? – Interventions and secret diplomatic channels via Brazil, Poland, and the Netherlands
– Post-Crisis Cuba and the Soviet Bloc – Raul Castro in Eastern Europe and Aleksei Kosygin in Havana.

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Published by: The Wilson Center on May 09, 2013
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The Global Cuban Missile Crisis at 50
BULLETIN  
Issue 17/18
Fall 2012
Published in cooperation with the National Security Archive Edited by James G. Hershberg and Christian F. Ostermann
Featuring new evidence on:
New Evidence From Behind the Iron, Bamboo, and Sugarcane Curtains, and Beyond
 
* When Che Met Mao* Behind Closed Kremlin Doors* The View From Havana* Khrushchev Unplugged* The Soviet-Cuban Missile Crisis* Mikoyan’s “Mission Impossible”* Cuba and the Sino-Soviet Split* Would-Be Mediators? Brazilian,Polish, Dutch...* Raul Castro in Eastern Europe,Kosygin in Havana
COLD WAR INTERNATIONAL HISTORY PROJECT
 
e Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholarsis the national, living U.S. memorial honoring President Woodrow Wilson. In providing an essential link betweenthe worlds of ideas and public policy, the Center addressescurrent and emerging challenges confronting the UnitedStates and the world. e Center promotes policy-relevantresearch and dialogue to increase the understanding and enhance the capabilities and knowledge of leaders,citizens, and institutions worldwide. Created by an act of Congress in 1968, the Center is a nonpartisan institutionheadquartered in Washington, D.C.; it is supported by both public and private funds.Conclusions or opinions expressed in Center publicationsand programs are those of the authors and speakers. ey do not necessarily reect the views of the Center sta,fellows, trustees, advisory groups, or any individuals ororganizations that provide nancial support to the Center.e Center is the publisher of e Wilson Quarterly andthe home of both the Woodrow Wilson Center Press andthe dialogue television and radio program. Formore information about the Center’s activities and
publications, please visit us on the Web at
http://www.wilsoncenter.org/. Joseph B. Gildenhorn, Chairman of the BoardSander R. Gerber, Vice Chairman Jane Harman, Director, President and CEO
Public Board Members:
 James H. Billington, Librarian of CongressHillary R. Clinton, Secretary, U.S. Department of State,G. Wayne Clough, Secretary, Smithsonian Institution, Arne Duncan, Secretary, U.S. Department of Education,David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, JamesLeach, Chairman, National Endowment for the Humani-ties, Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Designated Appointee of thePresident from within the Federal Government: Fred P.Hochberg, Chairman and President, Export-Import Bank 
Private Board Members:
Timothy Broas; John T. Casteen, III; Charles E. Cobb, Jr.;elma Duggin; Carlos M. Gutierrez; Susan Hutchison;Barry S. Jackson
Wilson National Cabinet:
Eddie and Sylvia Brown, Melva Bucksbaum and Ray-mond Learsy, Ambassadors Sue and Chuck Cobb, LesterCrown, elma Duggin, Judi Flom, Sander R. Gerber, Ambassador Joseph B. Gildenhorn and Alma Gildenhorn,Harman Family Foundation, Susan Hutchison, Frank F.Islam, Willem Kooyker, Linda B. and Tobia G. Mercuro,Dr. Alexander V. Mirtchev, Wayne Rogers, Leo Zickler
Cold War International History Project 
EDITOR: CHRISTIAN F. OSTERMANNGUEST-EDITOR: JAMES G. HERSHBERG ASSISTANT EDITORS: LAURA DEAL, ALLISON LYALIKOV DESIGN: DIANA MICHELI
Cold War International History Project
 
(CWIHP) was established at theWoodrow Wilson International Center or Scholars in Washington, D.C., in 1991 withthe generous support o the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. It isdirected by Christian F. Ostermann, who oversees the Wilson Center’s History andPublic Policy Program.The Project supports the ull and prompt release o historical materials by govern-ments on all sides o the Cold War, and seeks to accelerate the process o integratingnew sources, materials and perspectives rom the ormer “Communist bloc” with thehistoriography o the Cold War which has been written over the past ew decadeslargely by Western scholars reliant on Western archival sources. It also seeks totranscend barriers o language, geography, and regional specialization to create newlinks among scholars interested in Cold War history.Among the activities undertaken by the Project to promote this aim are a periodicBulletin and other publications to disseminate new fndings, views, and activities per-taining to Cold War history; a ellowship program or young historians rom the ormerCommunist bloc countries to conduct archival research and study Cold War history inthe United States; and international scholarly meetings, conerences, and seminars.CWIHP receives unding rom the Korea Foundation (Seoul), the MacArthurFoundation (Chicago), the Karl and Martha Mautner Fund, the Carnegie Corporation(New York), the Leon Levy Foundation (New York), the Blavatnik Family Foundation(New York), and other donors.Donations to the project are very welcome and, like all contributions to the WilsonCenter, are tax-deductible.
CWIHP Advisory Committee
William C. Taubman
(Amherst College), Chair
Michael BeschlossJames H. Billington
(Library o Congress)
Warren Cohen
(University o Maryland – Baltimore County)
John Lewis Gaddis
(Yale University)
James G. Hershberg
(George Washington University)
Samuel F. Wells, Jr.
(Woodrow Wilson Center)
Sharon Wolchik 
(George Washington University)
CWIHP Senior Scholars
Hope M. Harrison
(The George Washington University)
Chen Jian
(Cornell University)
A. Ross JohnsonBernd SchaeferDavid Wolff
(Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido)
Vladislav Zubok 
(Temple University)
 
3
he Cold War International History 
Pj  p  p 
Issue of the CWIHP Bulletin on“The Global Cuban Missile Crisis.” Timedfor publication on the 50th anniversary of this most dangerous Cold War crisis thisOctober, the Issue continues the Project’smission to enrich scholarship and pub-lic policy debate through new archivalevidence from inaccessible (or less easily accessible) archives around the world.This online Issue features sources on the Cuban MissileCrisis from more than twenty countries: Brazil, Bulgaria,Chile, China, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, France,Germany (East and West), Hungary, Italy, Israel, Mexico,Mongolia, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Russia,Switzerland, and North Vietnam. In
toto
y ,  p,
contribute to internationalizing the history of the crisis— with respect to decision-making drama during the crisiscentered in Moscow, Washington and Havana, as well as itsnear global ripples and reverberations that made themselvesfelt in such distant corners as Pyongyang and Hanoi. Threemajor introductions set the historiographic scene for thesematerials. Shorter introductions and editorial notes providefirst analytic cracks at the sources. A centerpiece of the issue—“Sino-Cuban Relations andthe Cuban Missile Crisis, 1960-62”—grows out of theremarkable archival opening at Foreign Ministry Archive of the People’s Republic of China in recent years. Since 2004,CWIHP has supported this process in cooperation withChinese scholars (centered especially around the Cold WarStudies Center at East China Normal University). Based onagreements with the Foreign Ministry since 2005, CWIHPhas been releasing and will continue to release major new tranches of documentation on China’s Cold War era foreignpolicy. In August 2011, CWIHP and East China NormalUniversity launched the Wilson Center-ECNU Cold WarStudies Initiative designed to bring junior and seniorChinese scholars to Washington for archival and otherresearch. A special China portal on CWIHP’s website at www.cwihp.org will feature many of these collections.The documents in this Issue will also be availablethrough CWIHP’s new state-of-the-art Digital Archivedatabase, content management system and website which—once launched later this year—will transform and improvethe storage, description, and searchability of our onlinecollections. CWIHP is in the final year of a three-yeardevelopment and digitization project funded by the LeonLevy Foundation (New York), H.F. “Gerry” Lenfest andthe Blavatnik Family Foundation (New York), as a result of  which CWIHP’s newly digitized collections will be accessiblethrough a new, visually dynamic and user-friendly website. As part of the Wilson Center’s History & Public Policy Program, CWIHP continues to be joined at the hip withthe Korea Foundation-funded North Korea InternationalDocumentation Project (NKIDP) in exploring formerCommunist-world archives on North Korea’s politics andforeign policy. Similarly, CWIHP is expanding is “collec-tion scope” with a focus on the international history of nuclear proliferation through a Carnegie Corporation-fundedNuclear Proliferation International History Project (NPIHP). As all CWIHP productions, this Issue is a collaborativeenterprise. As editor, my particular thanks go to Jim Hershberg  who returned to CWIHP as a guest editor for this Issue with hisboundless enthusiasm, expertise and energy for the subject; andTom Blanton and Malcolm Byrne and their team at the NationalSecurity Archive who helped to obtain many of the documentsfeatured in this Issue for a path-breaking set of critical oral his-tory conferences in Havana in 2001-2002. I am grateful to thecontributors, translators and researchers of this issue, including  Alex Barrow, Pierre Asselin, Jordan Baev, Csaba Bekes, BastiaanBouwman, Phil Brenner, Christopher Dunlap, Piero Gleijeses,Malgorzata Gnoinska, Peer Henrik Hansen, Tanya Harmer,Hans-Herman Hertle, Adolf Kotlik, Mark Kramer, Guy Laron,Garret Martin, Hirata Masaki, Tim Naftali, Leopoldo Nuti,Silvio Pons, Stephanie Popp, Sergey Radchenko, Svetozar Rajak,Bernd Schaefer, Regina Schmidt-Ott, Marty Sherwin, Rimkovan der Maar, Ruud van Dijk, Oldrich Tuma, David Wolff,Qian Zhang, Shen Zhihua, and Vlad Zubok. We greatly appre-ciate the support of the Karl and Martha Mautner Fund. At the Center, my work as CWIHP director has benefit-ted from the support of The Hon. Jane Harman, President,Director and CEO of the Wilson Center, Michael VanDusen, Rob Litwak, Peter Reid and his wonderful designteam, in particular Diana Micheli. Last but not least, I owethanks to my talented and dedicated staff at the Project: JamesPerson, Tim McDonnell, Laura Deal, Allison Lyalikov, PieterBiersteker, Charles Kraus, and Kristina Terzieva. All of themhave played critical roles in assuring that this Issue came outin time and in good shape. They in turn have been supportedby an extraordinary group of research assistants and juniorscholars this past spring and summer: Kian Byrne, DanielChardell, Chandler Grigg, Jordan Harms, Yuree Kim, DavidNajmi, Phan Ngoc, Emily Olsen, and Benjamin Venable.
Christian F. Ostermann is the director o the Woodrow Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program and has headed CWIHP since 1997/98.
 
From the CWIHP Director