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Christ Weeping Over Jerusalem.

Christ Weeping Over Jerusalem.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE

BY JOHN STYLES, D.D.



" And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over
it, saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this
thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace ! but now
they are hid from thine eyes." — Luke xix. 41, 42.

BY JOHN STYLES, D.D.



" And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over
it, saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this
thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace ! but now
they are hid from thine eyes." — Luke xix. 41, 42.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on May 10, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/12/2014

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CHRIST WEEPIG OVER JERUSALEM.BY JOH STYLES, D.D." And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept overit, saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in thisthy day, the things which belong unto thy peace ! but nowthey are hid from thine eyes." — Luke xix. 41, 42.Thus the man of sorrows, and acquainted withgrief, yields to emotions it was impossible for him tosuppress. He was habitually and profoundly affectedby " thoughts too deep for tears." But here ascene opened to his view, which, like the rod of Moses, smote upon his heart, and the watersgushed forth. He wept, and gave audible ex-pression to his woe, in an exclamation which, forsolemn pathos, has no parallel, except in that whichhe uttered on a similar occasion, when the ampli-fication shows how entirely Jerusalem occupied hismind, interested his feelings, and awakened hissolicitude even to agony. " O Jerusalem, Jeru-salem ! which killest the prophets, and stonest themthat are sent unto thee ! how often would I havegathered thy children together, as a hen doth214CHRIST WEEPIGgather her brood under her wings, and ye wouldnot ! "In discoursing from this passage in our Lord'saffecting history, we shallI. Trace the sources of his tears as indicatedby the pathetic lamentation with which they wereaccompanied: and, II. Deduce from both, those
 
doctrinal and practical lessons, which they seemintended to suggest. We proceed toI. Trace the sources of the Saviour'stears.Tears spring from various sources : they some-times indicate weakness and want of self-control :they are frequently expressions of a transient,superficial sorrow: they are for the most partselfish, and are excited by the personal sufferingsof the individuals by whom they are shed. But thetears of Jesus were those of a superior nature ; theywere free from every selfish alloy; and indicateda grief more profound and agonizing than everpreyed upon a human heart before or since.Jesus beheld the city, " and wept over it."1. His tears were those of a refined and exaltedhumanity, whose every sensibility was touched bythe scene of human desolation with which Divineprescience surrounded him. The noblest naturesare always the most susceptible: but their grief corresponds with the occasion, and is justifiedby it. Here was a whole city of human beings,doomed to temporal destruction — to be the preyof famine, rapine, anarchy, and murder.His was not the lament of heartless taste : it wasOVER JERUSALEM. 215not the grief which the son of Vespasian betrayed,when he is represented by the poet, on a fine sum-mer's evening, just before his victorious arms le-velled the city in ruins, exclaiming to his com-panions as he beheld it," It moves me, Romans ! it confoundsThe counsels of my firm philosophy,That Ruin's merciless ploughshare must pass o'er,And barren salt be sown on yon proud city.How boldly doth it front us ! how majestically !Like a luxurious vineyard, the hill side
 
Is hung with marble fabrics, line o'er line,Terrace o'er terrace, nearer still, and nearerTo the blue heavens. Here bright and sumptuous palaces,With cool and verdant gardens interspers'd ;Here towers of war that frown in massy strength ;While over all hangs the rich purple eve,As conscious of its being her last farewellOf light and glory to that fated city..... Behold the Temple !In undisturb'd and lone serenity,Finding itself a solemn sanctuaryIn the profound of heaven ! It stands before usA mount of snow, fretted with golden pinnacles IThe very sun, as though he worshipp'd there,Lingers upon the gilded cedar roofs ;And down the long and branching porticoes,On every flowery sculptured capital,Glitters the homage of his parting beams."This is finely conceived. But what are tearsshed over the violations of taste, and the ruins of art ? More than once, our Redeemer referred withthe utmost calmness to the conflagration of thetemple, and predicted, with apparent indifference,that one stone should not be left upon another;216 CHRIST WEEPIGbut when he realized the misery which awaited theguilty population, he wept.2. He wept over it. They icere the tears of patriot-ism shed over the expiring glories of the country whichgave him birth.3. They were generous tears, wept over the mi-series of those that hated and persecuted him,discovering the sublimest magnanimity, and thegreatest tenderness.4. His tears flowed from a devout sympathy with allthe great and good, the long succession of holy mar-tyrs that had preceded him on the errand of compas-sion and mercy.

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