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Mosaic Groups and Types Key Explanations

Mosaic Groups and Types Key Explanations

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Published by Julie Thrasher
Great document which outlines the mosaic groups and social classes distinctions for use in Media and Sociological research. Especially useful for students undertaking research of their own into audiences or in which the audience plays a key role
Great document which outlines the mosaic groups and social classes distinctions for use in Media and Sociological research. Especially useful for students undertaking research of their own into audiences or in which the audience plays a key role

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Julie Thrasher on Apr 12, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/17/2011

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 Copyright Experian 1 Issue 2 December 2003
Mosaic UK Group and Type Descriptions
Group A: Symbols of Success
Sociology and Environment
Summary
Symbols of Success
contains people whose lives are ‘successful’ by whatever yardsticks societycommonly uses to measure success. These are people who have rewarding careers rather than jobs,who live in sought after locations, who drive the more modern and expensive cars and who indulge inthe most exotic leisure pursuits. Most, though not all, appear to enjoy stable household arrangements.
Demography
Most of these people have worthwhile professional or technical qualifications, and are now well set intheir careers. Their incomes have now risen deep into upper income tax ranges. Some work for largecorporations in senior management positions, some now command respected roles in professionalpractices. Others own successful enterprises that they have built up with their own commercialacumen.Mostly these people are now seeing the fruits of previous years of hard work and long hours, thoughthat does not necessarily mean that they are taking life easier now they are entering middle or later middle age. However they have reached a phase in their lives in which enjoyment of consumption andof leisure time are now more evenly balanced with the demands of work. People will by now, for example, have been able to afford to move to a more prestigious area of town, to a bigger house set inleafier gardens and perhaps more individual in its design.Children are now likely to be less burdensome in terms of time but more expensive in their leisureinterests, and independent in their lifestyles. Some will have to be regularly ferried to private schools,to be collected at the airport from foreign trips, to be equipped with the wherewithal for riding lessonsor sailing trips and to be funded for their years at university.These therefore are people with busy and complex family lives, who require heavy support fromgardeners, cleaners, builders and decorators to enjoy the fruits of past and current labours. Thoughthese are mostly white British neighbourhoods, they are likely to contain significant Jewish, European,Chinese and Indian minorities.
Environment
Neighbourhoods of 
Symbols of Success
are typically areas of choice housing, whether fashionableinner city neighbourhoods such as Kensington or the New Town area of Edinburgh, or prestige outer suburbs. These neighbourhoods are typically well established rather than new. Houses are well builtand spacious, with four or more bedrooms, and very often built to individual designs at low densities,and in places far away from major roads or centres of commercial or industrial employment. Though ininner cities they may take the form of town houses or even luxury flats, most will be in the form of detached, single family dwellings set in gardens or even grounds. These are well stocked with shrubsand flowering trees and in certain instances shaded by quite mature trees. All this vegetation providesprivacy to rear gardens and to front windows. Plots are usually large enough for cars to be parked off the street in dedicated driveways as well as garages, increasing numbers of which are electronicallyoperated.
Economy
Symbols of Success
is found concentrated in the economically more successful regions of the country,particularly in London and the South East of England, where a high proportion of the workforce isengaged in what are loosely known as ‘knowledge’ industries. These people are particularly likely towork in professional jobs, which by their nature are concentrated in the big cities, such as lawyers,surgeons, university professors, consultants or senior civil servants. Others cluster around those partsof the country that have been successful in attracting high technology companies, such as the M3/M4corridor, or where prestige universities have attracted important research and development centres.The importance of London and Edinburgh as centres of employment in financial services andgovernment is also reflected in the high concentrations of this type of neighbourhood in these cities.
 
Mosaic UK Group and Type DescriptionsCopyright Experian 2 Issue 2 December 2003
By contrast,
Symbols of Success
are not likely to be found in the deep countryside or in smallmanufacturing towns.
Consumer Values
Symbols of Success
typically consists of people who, having achieved a measure of success in someaspects of their lives, have moved beyond a need to impress others by the nature of things that theyown. Status among these people is established in more subtle ways, by the values associated with thebrand rather than by the product category, and by the manner in which the product is accessed andconsumed. The air of discretion and understatement, that is associated with traditional premiumbrands, appeals to a greater extent than flamboyance and conspicuous styles of consumptionassociated with the nouveau riche.
Money
These are likely to be people who have accumulated substantial equity in some form or other and tohave a high ‘net worth’. Assets might be held in the form of equity in high value properties, in stocksand shares, in pension schemes or in the form of illiquid assets such as business enterprises. Many of these people will also be at a stage in life where they are inheriting estates from deceased parents.Loans on houses are now often low in relation to their value and there is little need for credit to financeany but the largest purchases. Deciding how to invest rapidly accumulating wealth is a source of considerable interest to this Group.
Consumption Patterns
Symbols of Success
spends a lot of money both on premium brands within frequently consumedproduct categories and on specialist forms of consumption. Thus in terms of media they are likely tobe too busy to watch much television but anxious to keep in touch with current trends by reading thefinancial, arts and property sections of the major broadsheets as well as subscribing to magazinessuch as The Economist and Time. Clothes are likely to be bought from department stores and fromspecialist independents operating from heritage locations, rather than from major high street multiples.Their garages are likely to contain Mercedes and BMWs sometimes as convertibles and 4x4s.Supermarket trolleys are particularly likely to contain fresh fruit and vegetables, items from thedelicatessen and the fresh meat and fresh fish counters. Many more shopping trips are likely to bemade to specialist independent shops, whether for clothes, new kitchens of bathrooms, for wallpapersand floor coverings and for holidays, at outlets which provide a specialist range of merchandise andwhere more knowledgeable staff take a greater interest in matching the available offerings to theneeds of individual customers.Leisure is likely to be undertaken according to the preferences of individual family members. Thehusband may go to the golf club on his own. The parents may visit the theatre leaving the childrenbehind at home. The children may go off to their own camps during the summer holidays. The wifemay enjoy a visit to a spa during the day. Holidays are unlikely to be purchased from the brochures of the major travel companies but to involve self catering at owned or rented villas, skiing, boating or independent foreign travel.
 
Mosaic UK Group and Type DescriptionsCopyright Experian 3 Issue 2 December 2003
Group A: Symbols of Success
Type A01: Global Connections
Sociology and Environment
Summary
Global Connections
contains extremely expensive housing, mostly in central London, occupied by richpeople from abroad and by childless older people on extremely high incomes.
Demography
This Type contains many very wealthy people who, for one reason of another, want to live as close aspossible to the centre of a global city. Many of them are wealthy foreigners who find it convenient tohave a London pied-á-terre, others are managers with international corporations on temporaryassignment to the United Kingdom. Some are very wealthy British people who enjoy proximity to thevariety of restaurants and entertainment opportunities available in London’s West End. Some arepeople involved in the cultural agenda of the nation, whose working lifestyles make a central Londonresidence a necessity. An increasing proportion of the population are older divorcees who haveexchanged expensive suburban houses for smaller central London flats. The consistent feature of most of these people is that they have access to serious amounts of money and that they do not needto cater for the needs of children. Mixed in among this wealthy elite is a scattering of lower incomepeople, the porters and cleaners who service their apartments, and some well off younger singlessupported by rich parents. Despite the young profile of the population this is an inner city communitythat continues to support a significant population of well off older people, most of whom lease purposebuilt apartments in prestige blocks. The ambience is particularly international. News stands sell foreigneditions of papers from around the globe to large resident populations of Arabs, Americans and peoplefrom other Western European countries, many of whom live in their own favoured enclaves, often as aresult of the location of ex-patriate schools. Whereas these neighbourhoods contain significant Jewishcommunities, there are fewer members of more recently arrived minority groups than in other parts of London. Despite their high incomes the majority of the population are content to live in rented flats.They work locally in commercial rather than public sector occupations, and in service industries,particularly in banking and in commerce, rather than in manufacturing. Many directors of largecompanies live in these areas which provide convenient access to corporate headquarters, but there isalso a significant number of people who are self-employed. The prestige nature of these locationsleads to a perverse position on indicators of social deprivation commonly used by government. Notonly are these areas ones where comparatively few people own a car – people use taxis instead – butlevels of household overcrowding and of shared access to bathrooms and toilets is also well above thenational average – reflecting the minority population of affluent young couples sharing studioapartments.
Environment
Global Connections
is most common in central London locations such as Kensington and Chelsea,Notting Hill, St Johns Wood and Hampstead, which were favoured by the Georgian and Victorianmerchant classes. Typically they live in mid rise apartment blocks that are more common incontinental European cities than in Britain, where a guarded entrance hallway with plants andcomfortable chairs gives way to lifts, which take the wealthiest to penthouses and those of moremodest means to second to fourth floor flats. Most of the accommodation is in older properties someof which were purpose built, and sold originally on long-term leases by large estate owners, but muchis in prestigious old houses, many with basements for their original owners’ servants and steps leadingup to an impressive entrance. These have been tastefully converted into small studios whose ownersare contacted through a battery of separate doorbells and entry phones. In the more central locations,apartments are set directly off the street, elsewhere set back behind the iron railings that protect thebasement. Some surround small parks to which owners have communal access. In each case theapartments are arranged to give the appearance of a terraced street. In areas further from the centreof London some of these flats stand in their own grounds. These neighbourhoods, examples of whichcan be found in Notting Hill and West Hampstead, take the form of high density two storey terracedhouses shared by high earning singles. These residential areas quickly give way to major arterialthoroughfares on whose busy pavements smart restaurants jostle with designer clothes shops, sellersof expensive kitchens and other home improvement services, antique shops and the ubiquitous

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