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Mediating the Mekong - Final Report - For Screen

Mediating the Mekong - Final Report - For Screen

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Asia Art Archive Research Grant. 2005 co-award.

Richard Streitmatter-Tran, Mediating the Mekong Richard Streitmatter-Tran's research looked at the Mekong region, where he examined the importance of the media in effecting work produced in the region. Over the life of the project, Streitmatter-Tran traveled to Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar and Vietnam. He proceeded by making a general assessment of the media infrastructure for each country and then seeking out artists that were either using, commenting or resisting media in the production of their work. Videos, images and documents were collected in the course of his research. Richard Streitmatter-Tran is an artist and researcher working and living in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
Asia Art Archive Research Grant. 2005 co-award.

Richard Streitmatter-Tran, Mediating the Mekong Richard Streitmatter-Tran's research looked at the Mekong region, where he examined the importance of the media in effecting work produced in the region. Over the life of the project, Streitmatter-Tran traveled to Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar and Vietnam. He proceeded by making a general assessment of the media infrastructure for each country and then seeking out artists that were either using, commenting or resisting media in the production of their work. Videos, images and documents were collected in the course of his research. Richard Streitmatter-Tran is an artist and researcher working and living in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

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Published by: R. Streitmatter-Tran on Apr 14, 2009
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11/08/2012

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MEDIATING THE
 
MEKONG
2005 Martell Contemporary Art Research Grant
for the Asia Art ArchiveR. Streitmatter-TranHo Chi Minh City, Vietnam
 
Contents
Precursors: A River Runs Through ItMediating the MekongThe Mekong VacuumInfrastructures and SuperstructuresCambodiaMyanmarVietnamLaosThailandThe Future FlowReferences
The research for this report, made possible by the 2005 MartellContemporary Asian Art Research Grant and the Asia Art Archive inHong Kong, was conducted between July 2005 and September 2006.I would like to thank the team at the Asia Art Archive for their support,in particular Phoebe Wong and Claire Hsu for their encouragement andadvice throughout the life of the project and for the opportunity to have presented the research in Hong Kong in June 2006.The report would not have been realized without the contributions of the many artists, curators and arts organizations in Cambodia, Vietnam,Laos, Myanmar and Thailand who provided information, media andhonest opinion.It is my hope that this report may assist as an entry point for thosewishing to explore further this unique and often overlooked region.Richard Streitmatter-Tran, artistHo Chi Minh City, VietnamSeptember 2006
 
Mediating the Mekong
 Martell Contemporary Asian ArtResearch GrantFinal Report for the Asia Art ArchiveSeptember 2006
Precursors: A River Runs Through It
In January 2003, the Thai Embassy in Phnom Penh wasablaze as people throughout the city took to the streets,vandalizing Thai businesses for what now appearsto be the consequence of an orchestrated politicalmanipulation of media disinformation gone awry. Thisincident was widely believed to have followed a report inthe Cambodian press that a popular Thai actress claimedthat Angkor, the pride and soul of Cambodia, rightfullybelonged to Thailand and ought to be returned. If thereis one thing that can be associated with Cambodia, it isAngkor. Its preeminence in history, art and culture is thecrux of all that is Khmer. The alleged comment was laterdiscovered to either have been completely fabricated orattributed as a factual statement when in reality it mayhave simply been a line from a fictional character in a Thaisoap opera taken out of context.As the Thai Royal Army was dispatched into Phnom Penh,the media coverage in neighboring Vietnam, known forits sensitivity to regional stability, had very little commentabout the unfolding turmoil just 150 kilometers west ofHo Chi Minh City. Less interesting were the riots thanthe power of the media to provoke and later dismiss thepotential crisis. In just a few short months one would behard-pressed to read follow-up coverage of the riots in theCambodian and Thai media. What might have spread intoa regional crisis was all but forgotten months later.It begs to ask why what a Thai actress allegedly saysabout Cambodia really matters at all? For those familiarwith this region of the world, it is clear. Economically,the mass exportation of Thai culture (programming,entertainment and media) has increasingly become anissue of national concern for Laos and Cambodia whoshare close cultural and linguistic similarities. Thesetwo nations are sandwiched between the larger andeconomically powerful Thailand and Vietnam. Thereis always an acute sensitivity to these pressures. Andwhat potentially affects one country indeed affects all.One might only be reminded of the explosive potentialof Eastern Europe and the evidence that ASEAN(Association of Southeast Asian Economic Nations) istroubled year after year about the situation in Myanmar.Cambodia’s political volley between the evil to the eastand the evil to the west is as predictable as the changingcourse of the Mekong River itself.It is in Phnom Penh every year that waters from as farnorth as Tibet flow south via the Mekong River, engorgingthe Tonlé Sap river basin and forcing the river to doubleback upon itself, reversing its flow. It is the dynamics ofthis river that metaphorically inspire this report for theAsia Art Archive as made possible by the 2005 MartellAsian Art Research Grant. It is a contradiction andwonder that the Mekong River simultaneously separatesand connects, nourishes and destroys, informs andobfuscates, geographically demarking national borderswhile connecting peoples and economies through alife sustaining artery. The GMS (Greater Mekong Sub-region including Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laosand Vietnam) has historically been one of constantredistribution of land and people and thus culture. Itcontinues to this day when one looks at resistancemovements in Southern Thailand, the Karen and Shanstates in Myanmar and among various minorities inCentral Vietnam and with border and economic relationsbetween Cambodia and Vietnam, Myanmar and Thailand.For example, we find many of Burma’s political dissidentsoperating out of Chiang Mai in a similar way that Tibetandissidents operate out of India.The GMS has a rich social and political spectrum, froma developed market-based civil society in Thailand toa repressive military junta in Myanmar, with the formerIndochinese colonies of Vietnam and Laos and Cambodiafalling somewhere between. (Note: As of the final writingof this report, the Thai government of Prime MinisterThaksin Shinawatra was overthrown in a military coup,which goes to reinforce an important point – all things thatbelong to the river flow like the river.)
Mediating the Mekong
The namesake of this project,
Mediating the Mekong 
,may be read in two ways: mediation and media. Firstly,mediation can be understood as a process of negotiationand an attempt to understand how Mekong-based artists,curators, and arts organizations negotiate the productionof artwork under widely disparate conditions both withintheir respective nations and among. On the other hand,we might focus on
media as communications technologies 
.In this respect I am interested in the role that media playsin the Mekong region within the arts. As our informationincreasingly arrives through mediated channels, whetheras websites, blogs, rss feeds, cds and dvds, streamingvideo on mobile phones, and even through televisionand radio programming, it becomes inevitable that thesechannels may be reversed, becoming transmission toolsfor artists. If artists in the Mekong are actively consumingand sharing information among one another, whatevidence is there of such a network?Together, these two approaches join when the MekongRiver is metaphorically seen a conduit for contemporaryarts information, mitigating local and national mediacontrols. As such I set out to collect information andmedia related to contemporary arts in national mediachannels (newspapers, magazines, and internet sites),while at the same time observing the informationinfrastructure that they operate from within. This approachrelies on the assumption that key to understandingthe contemporary arts practice in this region was tobetter understand how information itself was produced,distributed and controlled, rather than to solely understandthe media technologies one has access to. Many artists,students and organizations may have access to mediatechnologies, and yet without teachers, mentors, curatorsand spaces that possess a clear understanding of howthese technologies can best be implemented into eithera curriculum or emerging art scene, these technologiessimply become hollow product showrooms, with theoutput being amateur or conceptually deficient and thenetworks inefficient. Thus many of the projects that Ispeak about do not directly concern media technologies,but rather engage the other sense of the word
mediating as negotiation 
. These examples demonstratehow artists in the GMS have found ways to produce andorganize projects that connect countries within this region.Over the life of the project, I traveled to Cambodia, Laos,Thailand, Myanmar and various locations throughoutVietnam. I proceeded by taking a general assessmentof the media infrastructure for each country and thenseeking out artists that were either using, commenting orresisting media in the production of their work. I wouldcollect videos, images and documents in the course ofthe research that were later given to the Asia Art Archivefor their proper documentation. There were cases whereartists created virtual spaces for critical arts discussion intheir local language, yet hosted them beyond the bordersof the country to avoid having the sites shut down, as wellas other cases of underground publishing. The artistsI met were encouraged to speak freely but I pressuredno one to make comments they felt uncomfortablewith, on- or off-record. Indeed much of the informationgathered occurred through relaxed conversation oftenat small gatherings with artists at tea and coffee shops.Not surprisingly these public spaces were often centralinformation depots, as we find in the case of Myanmarwhere artists remain well-informed of regional and worldarts information despite extremely restricted internet andcommunications access.
Fig 1.1
A sign points to an empty office space in Vientiane
Fig 1.2 
Burmese artists engage in morning conversation at one ofYangon’s many street side tea shops.

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