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Victorian Ghosts (1950)

Victorian Ghosts (1950)

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Published by draculavanhelsing
Geraldton Guardian 1950 (Aug 17)
Geraldton Guardian 1950 (Aug 17)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on May 17, 2013
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04/10/2014

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Geraldton Guardian (WA : 1948 - 1950), Thursday 17 August 1950, page 4National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article67936456
Queer
Ghost
Stories
MysteriousOccurrences
HUMOR
AND
TRAGEDY
England
has
not
a
.monopoly
of
ghost
stories.Australiahas
several(writes
a
Melbourne
'Argus''
corres
pondent).Perhaps
youdo
uot
believein
ghosts.
But,
then,
neitherdoestheRev.
ArchibaldHamiltonRoss,
a
re
tired
Presbyterian
clergyman,
who
owns
Coriyule,
at
Drysdale,
one«-f
Victoria's'haunted
houses.'
At
Coriyule
thereis
no
escaping
tho'?ghost''that
plays
tinkling,
melodictunes
on
theold
piano,
thecheerful
ghost,
or
the
mournful
one
that
nioaas
from
room
toroom
ofthis
100year
oldresidence.
EvenMr.
Ross,
'
whoclaimsto
have
laidthese
ghosts,
al
mitsthathe
cauaotescapethem
with
out
deserting
thehouse.Andhehasgrown
so
fondof
it
inhis
twenty-four
yearsof
ownership
thathewould
nar
dreamof
leaving.
Coriyule
liasthe
rightatmosphere
forthe
supernatural.
It
occupies
a
prominenceoverlooking
'Port
Phillip
Bay,
and
was
constructed
ofbasalt.
Only
the'freestone
parts
aJ'e
to-day
showing
signs
of
weather-wear.
r.t
standssolidly
noon
a
fortress-Hko
basement,apertured
foy
thegunssettlersused
to
ljeatoftattacks
by
thenatives.A
lovely
featureofthis
strange
old
place
isthe
windows,leaded
indiamond
shape.*Thehousawas
built
for
Miss
Drys
dale,
whogaveher
name
tothe
local
township.
Aremarkablewoman,thesisterof
a
treasurer
of
Edinburgh,
she
was
middle-aged
beforeshe
migrated
from
Scotland.Three
years
after
Coriyule
was
built,
Miss
Drysdale
died.
Her
body
was
buried
beneath
a
poplar
tree
ona
hilltop
within
sight
ofthe
homesteadand
a
favouritehorse
was
buried
nearby.
Thehorseremains,but
a
later
owter
of
Coriyule
had
Miss
Drysdale's
remains
removed
fo
a
neighbouring
cemetery.
Dr.John
Diinmore
Lang,
a
member
of
theLegislative
CouncilofNew
SouthWales,
notedthedomesticchar
acterof
MissDrysdale's
establishment.
Hesaid:
'I
could
not
helpthinking
thattheveryhorsesandcattleseemedtoconsiderthemselves
more
athomeherethan
elsewhere/'However,'Cori
yule
hasnot
given
peacetoallitsinhabitants.
Thewife
of
one
managerofthe
property^
was'
Beared
right
-lc
thehomestead
one
squallynight
whenshe
heard
whatshe
thought
to
be
a
piano
tinkling
inthe
front
room.
Then
a
cheerfulwhistle
joined
inthe
fan
tastictune.
She
fled
from
thehouse.
.
From
this
incidentthe
house
became
well
known
locally
as
the
'Haunted
House,'
andpeople^
pleased
themselveswhether
they
believed
the
stories
cir
culating
aboutits
ghosts.
Mr.
Ross
says
that'
he
solved
the
mystery
ofthe
tinkling
piano
one
squally
night.
T^liis
night
the
sound
ofmusic
coming
'from
the
room
in
front
ofthe,
house,
which
was
sufferingthe
bruntofthe
storm,attracted*
him.
Hecrept
inand
fouad
ilwas
uuij
merain
iiiiiuig
iiaru
against
the
unprotected
windowsandsounding
differentnotes.
When
he
tapped
his
knuckles
against
thepanesheknewthesecretofthe
piano-playing
ghost.The
whistlingghost
he
laidinthe
oldconservatory.Therethewindscreeched
through
a
keyhole,surged
down
a
light
well
on
top
of
the
great
circularhall
which
centres
Coriyule,
toereatethe
cheerfulaod
unhappy
ghosts.This
story
oVthe
ghosts
of
Coriyuleby
nomeans
'exhausts
Victorian
leg
endsofthe
supernatural;
Undoubt
edly
themost
celebrated
is
thatoftheHauntedHillsof
Gippsland.
The
hillslie
*outh
of
Yallourn,
and
thewhiteribbo»-of
road^
runningthrough
themistlie
original
track
..f
the
pioneeringdays.Today
it
is
wellbitumenedand
linedwith
littlewhite
posts,
but
therewas'
a
timewhen
?
 
posts,
but
therewas'
a
timewhen
?
With
eyes
bloodshot
andhides
fleckedwith
foam,
wildcattle
one
day
stampeded
through
the
roughhamletthit
was
Moeofthemiddleoflast
century.
Their
long
hornswavingviciously,they
swept
terror
stricken
through
the
township.A
Missing
Drover
Nodroverfollowedtheanimalsand
wonderingly
the-
storekeeper
andbar
man
returned
?
totheircounters
after
the
passing
ofthe
herd.
A
week
laterthe
stampede
still
needed
an
explan
ation,andseveral
more
of
the.adven
turous
farmersrode
Intothehillsto
lookforthe
missing
drover.
They
foundthebodies
of
scores
ofcaWe
near
whathadbeenthelast
camping
spot.The
blackened
ashes
of
thedrover'sSre
were
still
undisturbed,
butthere
wasno
sign
ofthe
missing,
man.
Itis
saidthat
later
anotherdrover
was
taking
a
mob
across
by
the
same
routewhen
the
cattle
stampeded.
He
swore
thathecouldhear
a
large
mob
of
ghost
cattleandthe
cracking
of
stockwhips
fromthe
other
sideof
the
hills.Another
story
has
it
that
some
menwere
camping
on
thehillsforthe
night
withtheircattle.
They
becamei*estless,and
it
was
decidedthat
two
drovers
should
go
roundtothe
opposite
sideofthe
hillto
investigate.Sometimelater
they
came
back,looking
verywhitefacedandin
a
hurry
to
move
off.
They
said
onlythat
they
hadheard
extraordinary
noises,andwantedto
get
thecattleaway
assoonas
possible.
IsAtanywonderthatamongthedroversthehills
became
a
place
jfterror
-to
be
avoided
atali
costs?How
ever,
the
theory
hasbeen
advancedthatthe
hills
containing
brown
coal,
were
burntoutatthe
same
time,and
are
now
.
partially
hollow,
thus
ac
counting
for
the
uncanny
sound
of
a
herd
on
the
move.
However,
there
isstiJlone
strange
facttobe
explained
l»efore
accepting
thisidea.Nowhereinthehillswillyou
see
a
single
beastyou
see
a
grazing.Thenthere
is
theweh-d
story
ofthetrotting
cob.Itissaid
that
sheepput
into
a
paddock
on
a
big
estate
near
Rourke,
inNew
South
Wales,
never
restat
night.
Strange
Horseman*
-
Everyhalf-hourthey
riseand
make
a
lane
through
their
midstwhilethemuster
dogs
slinkaway.Downthelane,
the
legend
goes,
a
ghostly
horseman
canters
asif
attempting
tomove
the
sheep.
Stockmenhavesaidthat
this
hasbeen
repeated
a
dozentimesat
night,
until
now
they
areun
willing
to
spend
a
night
inthat
pad
dock,and
it
has
been
deserted
formanyyears.
Rosedale
hastire
story
of
a
rattlingfouivwheelcart,
drawn
by
two
lathered
horses,
a
sobbing
man,
and
an
old
bridge.
Oldidentitiesassertthat
-once
a
year
thehorses,cart,
and
sobbing
man
disappear
whenhalf
across
the
bridge
into-the
.
floodwatersbeneath.
When
one
ofOobbandCo.'searliestcoachdrivers,CharlieLeedied
at
tlS?
ageof
eighty-seven
years
in
DeiUliquin
in
1929,the
story
was
recalledof
i
headless
ghost
ona
trotting
cob.
Char
lie
andthe
other
driverswh6
had
takencoaches
on
the
Hay-Deniliquiii
routeknew.the
ghost
well.
They
said
theheadless
horsemanused
to
circlearoundtheBlack
Swamp,
which
wasone
stage
ofthe
journey
none
of
the
j
drivers
wouldmakealone.
:
Fewmotorists
drivingalong
tboMelbourne
roa-d,
between
Spotswood
and
Yarraville,
knowabout
a
very
ac
tive
'ghost'
that
frequented
the
spot
where
the
Stony
Creek
crosses
theroad.Because
of
him,
driversofhorse
drawn
vehiclesandhorsebackridersinthe
pastusually
tried
to
getaway
fromthis
spot
beforenightfall.
Man's
ThroatCut
-'?0-u.y£*=*IL&-«.l£^U
LU13«il-Lilt;
V'lll.-
roadto
MelbournefromWilliamstown.Oneachside
was
densebush.Tw«»

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