Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Cycle 4: Adding a Mid-Point Critique

Cycle 4: Adding a Mid-Point Critique

Ratings: (0)|Views: 73|Likes:
Published by Jason Leath
Testing if the students would use a mid-point critique if offered, to look at their photography.
Testing if the students would use a mid-point critique if offered, to look at their photography.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Jason Leath on May 19, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/18/2015

pdf

text

original

 
Cycle 4
Adding a Mid-Point Critique:6 Respondents
 ACTION TAKEN:
 
The rubric was again modified to improve the clarity of feedback based on student suggestions. In this cycle I offered a midpoint critique for anystudents interested in utilizing that time for guidance, before turning in their finalimages.
 
RESEARCH QUESTION:
How will using a multimodal approach paired with in-class critiques at the midpoint, and a rubric modified for clarity, affect student-learning outcomes, as evaluated by the students? 
 
PREDICTED OUTCOME:
Though a midpoint critique is offered this cycle, I do not expect students to utilize that time because normally they do not have enoughfinished artwork. The clarification of the rubric would also be helpful to the
students’ under
standing of their assessment because the wording would be lessconfusing.
 
EVIDENCE USED TO EVALUATE THE ACTION:
The evidence used to evaluatethe actions at the end of this cycle was survey with the following questions:1.
 
Having received video feedback for the fourth time, how do you feel about it?2.
 
This assignment provided the option to present what you were working onto the group or to the teacher individually. No one chose to have a mid-point critique of their work. Do you think providing this option for mid-point feedback was helpful?3.
 
Why do you think no one chose to volunteer for feedback at the mid-point?4.
 
The rubric was modified to add space for written reflections from theteacher. Was it helpful to see
the teacher’s thoughts and feedback written at 
the bottom of the rubric?5.
 
The rubric was modified to clarify some of the categories. Did theclarification of categories improve your understanding of the rubric?6.
 
Are there any other parts of the rubric that need more clarification?
EVALUATION:
Students responded that they continued to prefer the use of videofeedback, and the responses were again overwhelmingly positive. 50% of theresponses were top marks and the rest of the respondents were neutral or better. These findings continued to suggest that video feedback was a beneficial tool toevaluate student artwork.When asked if providing an opportunity for midpoint feedback was useful, 50% of the respondents thought this was beneficial, while the rest of the respondents wereagainst they idea. Since the question was designed to look for a majority opinion,split results create an inconclusive finding. Most respondents stated that they didnot chose to take advantage of this midpoint feedback option, and 66% respondents
 
suggested that students normally do not have their enough work finished by themidpoint to take advantage of the critique. Two replies were removed from thefindings because they did not answer the question. The two responses given were
“Iwould have,” and “I don't understand the question.”
 
Figure 4.1. The rubric was modified to add space for written reflections from the
teacher. Was it helpful to see the teacher’s thoughts and feedback written at the
bottom of the rubric? 
The fourth question asked if it was helpful to see the written feedback on the bottomof the rubric (Figure 4.1.) 66% of the students indicated that it was helpful, 17%respondent was neutral and another 17% indicated that it was not helpful. Thenegative responses were further explained in the comments section with the
statement, “you mentioned everything through voice so the written reflection doesnot add any info.” Even though this point is accurate, the idea behind the
multimodal approach is to present the information through written and verbalchannels in the hopes of increasing retention. While this is a valid point, themajority of feedback was positive so I will continue writing my thoughts becausewas beneficial to my overall quality of feedback.Rewriting of the rubric provided at least some clarification to the information to
50% of the respondents. All of the responses for the subsequent question, “arethere any other parts that need clarification,” indicated that there was not a need for
further clarification. These responses taken together suggested that the two neutralresponses on the use of the rubric might be because the responders did not haveany confusion with the rubric to begin with. It could also indicate that they did not 
33%33%17%17%0%
Was written feedback on the rubrichelpful?
Yes, I think it wasvery helpfulYes, I think it wassomewhat helpfulI don't feel eitherwayNo, I don't think it isthat helpfulNo, it is not helpful at all
 
closely look at the changes that had been made to the rubric before responding tothis survey so they had no basis to accurately answer the question.
REFLECTION:
This is the first time that I have received a neutral response whenasking the students how they felt about video feedback. I have been expectingneutral responses to occurred earlier and I am surprised that they are onlybeginning now. There are a number of potential reasons why I did not receive all
positive response, the first being that the “newness” may hav
e worn off. The classhas been using video based feedback since November and the students may finallybe adapting to the format. Another possibility could have been based in my numberof respondents whose opinions could have influenced the results. Not all of mystudents complete every project, and so I did not provide feedback for the fivestudents who did not finish their work. It could also be that this neutral student didnot complete previous assignments, and as been feeling this way all along. The finalpossibility is that the student could have received more criticism this time than inprevious assignments, and they were unhappy when they completed the survey.I may have to test the idea of midpoint feedback again in a setting that takes longerto complete, so that the students who think this is a beneficial idea would have anopportunity to utilize this feedback. The current model of these assignments runsbetween a week and a week and a half, which does not give the students a great dealof time to work ahead. I can envision that having a midpoint critique could be a
helpful way of guiding the students’ work, however, using the midpoint critique on a
project based around three class periods does not appear to benefit the students. Imay bring the midpoint critique back in a future assignment that covers more classdays, to see if it is beneficial to longer projects.
There were two responses that did not address question three. “I would have,”
indicates that the student may not have been at that class, however, this is not proof that they had the work done. This statement could also indicate that they were not expecting a midpoint critique, and so they had not completed their work. Onestudent responded that they did not understand the question. I cannot determine if they truly were confused or they just did not want to answer the question.Regardless, both of these responses were removed from the findings.I will continue placing written feedback at the bottom of my rubrics, not because of overwhelming support from the students, but rather it helps me to clarify mythoughts, which in turn, allows me to provide better feedback. In staying with themultimodal model, presenting written feedback is a good way to transferinformation and increase the chances of the students retaining the information. Thestudent responseswere not against the written feedback, only the need for itsexistence. While they may not have seen the need for written feedback, it made agreat difference in my thought process and in the overall quality of my feedback.
Therefore since it is not detrimental to the students’ learning, and it has been
helpful to me, I will continue providing written feedback at the bottom of the page. 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->