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Structured Dialogue report: Cyprus 2012

Structured Dialogue report: Cyprus 2012

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Published by Alex Farrow
The Structured Dialogue with young people has become an established process for participatory policy making in the youth field among the 27 EU Member States. It is a space for young people and policy makers to discuss and feed into EU youth policy at national and European level together, as well as a tool to ensure that youth policy meets the needs and expectations of young people across Europe. It takes the form of national consultations at Member State level and EU Youth Conferences at European level.

This report is the results of the UK consultation on migration.

The aim of the youth conference was to produce 14 joint recommendations which go to the EU Parliament, EU Member States and the wider policy makers at the European Union. The recommendations were created and cover education and language, attitudes, equal opportunities, support mechanisms and tools, participation and youth organisations.
The Structured Dialogue with young people has become an established process for participatory policy making in the youth field among the 27 EU Member States. It is a space for young people and policy makers to discuss and feed into EU youth policy at national and European level together, as well as a tool to ensure that youth policy meets the needs and expectations of young people across Europe. It takes the form of national consultations at Member State level and EU Youth Conferences at European level.

This report is the results of the UK consultation on migration.

The aim of the youth conference was to produce 14 joint recommendations which go to the EU Parliament, EU Member States and the wider policy makers at the European Union. The recommendations were created and cover education and language, attitudes, equal opportunities, support mechanisms and tools, participation and youth organisations.

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Published by: Alex Farrow on May 22, 2013
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REPORT FORM3
nd
round of National Consultations of the Structured DialoguePeriod: Trio Presidency Poland-Denmark-CyprusDEADLINE: Wednesday, 15
th
of August 2012.
Please find below a report form allowing your National Working Group to communicate the resultsof the national consultation to the European Steering Committee. The input you will providethrough this form will serve as a common base for the discussions at EU level.In order to allow the European Steering Committee to integrate the results of the nationalconsultations in preparation for the EU Youth Conference in Cyprus, we kindly ask you to please sendthis report form filled in to the European Steering Committee for the implementation of thestructured dialogue (
mail to:
bianca.faragau@youthforum.org, Cc.
 
sophie.tsouris@gmail.com)
andto your national government
by
Wednesday, 15
th
of August 2012.
The European Steering Committee kindly asks you to
fill out this form in English and return itin typed format (not as a PDF file, please).Technical details of the consultation:
Please provide the requested information on your National Working Group:Details of the contact persons:NameAneta KubalaE-mail addressAneta.kubala@byc.org.ukInstitutionBritish Youth CouncilPositionInternational OfficerEU Member StateUnited KingdomMembers of the National Working Group (number and names)Youth Organisations5 British Youth Council, UK Youth Parliament, Funky Dragon,Northern Ireland Youth Forum, Scottish Youth ParliamentNational Authorities 1 Department for EducationNational Agencies1OthersLevel of the consultation (national, regional, local)NationalxRegionalx
1
 
LocalxMethodologyThere were a variety of methods used in the consultation, on andoff line survey, consultation workshops, film interviews, votingpads sessions and roundtable with experts and refugees. 1000young people, experts and adults were consulted. Fourconsultation workshops with 97 young people in Wales,Hartlepool, Lincoln and Reading. Two Consultation workshopswith 38 Youth Workers from London and Nottingham. InScotland, there was a consultation session with voting pads with68 young people. Eight young people were interviewed on film. Aroundtable debate on migration was delivered with RefugeeYouth. Migration experts and 12 refugee and asylum seekeryouths attended the workshop which involved expert input anddebates and discussion from the refugee and asylum seekers.Two online surveys were developed in English and in Welsh. Byincluding the Welsh the online survey was more inclusive andaccessible. There were 752 respondents to the English surveyand 6 to the Welsh survey.Suggestions/best practicesWelsh survey, roundtable with migration experts and refugee andasylum seekers, filmed interviews.Estimated number of youngpeople participating in the overallconsultation959 young people and 38 youth workersEstimated number of youngpeople represented in the results of the consultation997(Around 11 % of participants were from a migrantbackground). Gender: 59 % female 39 % male. 80% were froma white ethnicity, 20 were from other ethnic backgrounds. 62 %were form England, 25% Scotland, 19% Wales and 5 % fromNorthern Ireland.
GUIDING QUESTIONS1. Youth Participation leading to Social Inclusion
Empowering every young person to fulfill his/her potential to participate actively at local, regional,national and European level is an essential factor for the achievement of greater 
 social inclusion
1
 
and for the sound, sustainable and democratic functioning of our societies.Participation means more than just turning up at elections. There is a wide variety of forms of  participation (Council Resolution on “Encouraging new and effective forms of participation of all young people in democratic life in Europe” 2011), some of them pertaining to the category whichcan be labeled as non-conventional/alternative
forms of participation
2
. In a broader sense, and for the scope of this questionnaire, youth participation is about young people having the right, themeans, the space, the opportunity and where necessary the support to freely express their views;it is about being heard and being able to influence decisions; it is about having the competencesand motivation to engage in actions and activities which contribute to the building of a better society.
1
Social inclusion is a process which ensures that those at risk of social exclusion gain the opportunities andresources necessary to participate fully in economic, social and cultural life and to enjoy a standard of living andwell-being that is considered normal in the society in which they live. It ensures that they have a greaterparticipation in decision-making that affects their lives and access to their fundamental rights.
2
"Conventional methods" of participation refer to elections, organizational membership, voting etc and "non-conventional/alternative" methods include for example participation to demonstrations.
2
 
 Although the need for the provision of equal opportunities in all fields, for all young people iswidely accepted, at the same time, it is observed that there are certain circumstances which prevent the participation of specific groups of young people such as
young people with migrant background 
3
. These circumstances take the form of obstacles which prevent these young peoplefrom participating (or, in certain occasions, lead them to choosing not to participate). Thesuccessful integration of young people with migrant background in the wider society is not only a pre-condition for democratic participation and for social cohesion, but also a dynamic and continuous two-way process of mutual accommodation. With increasing migration into and withinan already quite culturally differentiated EU and with a high proportion of this immigration fromcountries whose social and political cultures are significantly different, there is an urgent need tostrengthen policies that enhance the participation and lead to social inclusion of young people withmigrant background.
1.a. What are the main obstacles preventing social inclusion of young people withmigrant background?
1.1The results indicated two distinct responses, the first indicating that there are no issues orbarriers to integration of migrants in some areas. The second is from those who did seeobstacles. A significant number of the UK young people consulted felt that young peoplefrom migrant backgrounds did not have any obstacles preventing social inclusion and hadthe same opportunities as those born in the UK (41%). There was little difference betweenthe responses from young people from migrant backgrounds (31% felt this) and those bornin the UK (42%).The main reasons were that they felt there was no discrimination in their communities andschools, that legally migrant young people had the same rights and equal access toservices and provision. A minority of young people also felt that migrants received positivediscrimination and had better opportunities than those born in the UK.
‘The UK is nothing if not a melting pot of immigrants from all over the world. Our language,our law and our urbanism is based on a chaotic collectivism that is beautiful and terrifying.’ 
1.2However 45% felt that young people from migrant backgrounds did not have the sameopportunities than those born in the UK. The
main obstacles
preventing social inclusionfor young people from migrant backgrounds were the language barrier, followed by racism,negative perceptions of the public and media and poverty.
 
There was also a strong trendfor asylum seekers and refugees to state that they wanted to integrate into UK society butthere were numerous legal barriers inhibiting their progress.1.3Language is a fundamental barrier for integration within their communities andcommunicating at school and work. It was stated that there is not sufficient provisionsavailable for migrants to learn the language quickly. Many new migrants are placed inclasses with young people from the same country which inhibited them from learningEnglish. Also lack of provision for interpreters in schools and health services makes itchallenging for new migrants to communicate and access services.1.4There has been funding cuts in ESOL (English Speakers of Other Language) classes andthose without the basic understanding of English are not permitted to enroll on the coursetherefore causing a barrier for young people to take the first step to learn English.1.5Poor access to education was one of the main barriers raised by refugee and asylum seekeryoung people. They have limited access to schools, colleges and universities especially if they are over the age of 18. There are many barriers for these young people for example;young people who arrive in a middle of a school year have to wait until the next year toenroll due to insufficient school places. Refugees and asylum seekers are often made tomove house and school frequently which makes it difficult for young people to settle downand make friends. Accessing higher education is very challenging as university fees areexpensive particularly for those who have been residing in UK for less than 3 years (fees upto £9,000). As asylum seekers and refugees have limited access to work it was often seenas impossible to access higher education without funding or bursaries.
3
Young people with migrant background are young persons living in an EU country where they were not born,irrespective of whether they are third-country nationals, citizens of another EU Member State or subsequentlybecame nationals of the host Member State. Many experts in the field stress that for people with migrantbackground, immigration plays a key role in their biography whether they or their parents migrated. In thosecases where these people are not included, represented or accepted in the mainstream society, the migrantbackground is perceived to be negative.
3

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