Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Variability in Eritrea and the Archaeology of the Northern Horn During the First Millennium BC: Subsistence, Ritual, and Gold Production

Variability in Eritrea and the Archaeology of the Northern Horn During the First Millennium BC: Subsistence, Ritual, and Gold Production

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4 |Likes:
Peter R. Schmidt

Around the margins of Asmara, Eritrea, hundreds of sites dating to the
early and mid-first millennium BC have been documented. They range from single
family dwellings to small and large hamlets, small and large villages, and small
towns. We call these Ancient Ona sites, using the Tigrinya term for ruin. Our
findings testify to significant subsistence, ritual, and economic variation within a
region of 12 by 17 km: (1) different subsistence strategies in the well-watered, open
basin to the west of Asmara (emmer wheat, barley; cattle) compared to the uplands
north and east of Asmara (lentil, teff; goats/sheep); (2) ritual events, marked by stone
bulls' heads and a huge ash deposit at Sembel Kushet, that brought people together
in rites of passage and intensification during Meskel-like ceremonies, including
ritual exchange; and (3) the exploitation of gold north of Asmara among
heterarchically organized communities that exchanged specialized products within
this region.
Peter R. Schmidt

Around the margins of Asmara, Eritrea, hundreds of sites dating to the
early and mid-first millennium BC have been documented. They range from single
family dwellings to small and large hamlets, small and large villages, and small
towns. We call these Ancient Ona sites, using the Tigrinya term for ruin. Our
findings testify to significant subsistence, ritual, and economic variation within a
region of 12 by 17 km: (1) different subsistence strategies in the well-watered, open
basin to the west of Asmara (emmer wheat, barley; cattle) compared to the uplands
north and east of Asmara (lentil, teff; goats/sheep); (2) ritual events, marked by stone
bulls' heads and a huge ash deposit at Sembel Kushet, that brought people together
in rites of passage and intensification during Meskel-like ceremonies, including
ritual exchange; and (3) the exploitation of gold north of Asmara among
heterarchically organized communities that exchanged specialized products within
this region.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Felis_Demulcta_Mitis on May 23, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/18/2014

pdf

text

original

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 3 to 21 are not shown in this preview.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->