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Socioeconomic conditions and co-management structures that affect conservation sustainability in Nosy Hara National Marine Park - Hartshorn / C3 Madagascar 2012

Socioeconomic conditions and co-management structures that affect conservation sustainability in Nosy Hara National Marine Park - Hartshorn / C3 Madagascar 2012

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Published by C3publications
This report is the result of an internship conducted with the Madagascar branch of Community Centered Conservation (C3) in Nosy Hara National Marine Park. Madagascar’s Nosy Hara National Marine Park is at a critical conservation crossroads. Stakeholder groups agree on basic conservation premises but disagree on management vehicles and methods. Nosy Hara villagers are becoming increasingly disillusioned with Madagascar National Park management. Residents of the area currently comply with regulations but there is an absence of village participation [and opportunity for participation] in other areas of governance. Villagers feel management has failed to keep promises and does not benefit them. This study investigates socioeconomic conditions, user group interactions, and formal and informal institutions within NHNMP. Results enable exploration of current relationships between park management, park stakeholders and resources in order to help C3 identify sustainable co-management potentials.
This report is the result of an internship conducted with the Madagascar branch of Community Centered Conservation (C3) in Nosy Hara National Marine Park. Madagascar’s Nosy Hara National Marine Park is at a critical conservation crossroads. Stakeholder groups agree on basic conservation premises but disagree on management vehicles and methods. Nosy Hara villagers are becoming increasingly disillusioned with Madagascar National Park management. Residents of the area currently comply with regulations but there is an absence of village participation [and opportunity for participation] in other areas of governance. Villagers feel management has failed to keep promises and does not benefit them. This study investigates socioeconomic conditions, user group interactions, and formal and informal institutions within NHNMP. Results enable exploration of current relationships between park management, park stakeholders and resources in order to help C3 identify sustainable co-management potentials.

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Published by: C3publications on May 24, 2013
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Conservation in developing countriesA Nosy Hara National Marine Park Case Study
Socioeconomic conditions and co-management structures that affect conservation sustainability in NosyHara National Marine Park An Internship ReportSubmitted to the Facultyof the University of Miami,Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciencein partial fulfillment of the requirements for theDegree of Master of Professional ScienceIn cooperation with
Community Centred Conservation
 
Judith Hartshorn
 Division of Marine Conservation
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMIRosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science November 2012Approved:Committee chair:Associate Professor: Marine Affairs and Policy
 
Judith Hartshorn (MPS, Marine Conservation)
 
 
Conservation in developing countriesA Nosy Hara National Marine Park Case Study
Socioeconomic conditions and co-management structures that affect conservation sustainability in NosyHara National Marine Park University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Supervised by:
 Dr. Sarah Meltzoff, Dr. Kenny Broad and Dr. Thomas Steinfat
. Number of pages in text: 105This report is the result of an internship conducted with the Madagascar branch of Community
Centered Conservation (C3) in Nosy Hara National Marine Park. Madagascar’s Nosy Hara National
Marine Park is at a critical conservation crossroads. Stakeholder groups agree on basic conservation premises but disagree on management vehicles and methods. Nosy Hara villagers are becomingincreasingly disillusioned with Madagascar National Park management. Residents of the area currentlycomply with regulations but there is an absence of village participation [and opportunity for participation]in other areas of governance. Villagers feel management has failed to keep promises and does not benefitthem. This study investigates socioeconomic conditions, user group interactions, and formal and informalinstitutions within NHNMP. Results enable exploration of current relationships between park management, park stakeholders and resources in order to help C3 identify sustainable co-management potentials.
 
 
Acknowledgements
Many people and organizations played a pivotal role in the facilitation of my internship and thisreport. I would like to thank the University of Miami Masters of Professional Science degree program for the opportunity to partake in a hands-on internship experience as a degree requirement. Without RSMASstaff, curriculum, and ample opportunities I would have been unequipped for this internship and lack asupportive springboard. Thanks to Maria Estevenez for all the behind the scenes organizational work andcalm reassurance she provides. Thanks to my Committee members Dr. Thomas Steinfatt and Dr. KennyBroad along with my committee chair Dr. Sarah Meltzoff; whom contributed to my project throughsupervision and advice as well as motivation and inspiration. Each committee member is involved in projects that address real life issues and work to make the world a better place. In this regard, I hope tofollow in the footsteps of my committee members. The organization Community Centered Conservationalso deserves recognition, credit and thanks for providing the opportunity for masters students like myself to be involved in projects in areas such as Madagascar. The C3 internship experience allows C3 tofacilitate its own aid and research projects while simultaneously giving participants invaluable experiencein environmental work in third world countries, better equiping interns for future developmental work.C3 staff work ardently to make the organization and its internship programs a success. Masotra to IshmaelLeandre and Raymond Rayhekik, the onsite program officer and assistant. Ishmael and Raymond handleall the logistics, on site research, and teach students how to be Malagasy. Recognition is also deserved by
Madagascar’s program manager Slyviane Volmpaine, Chris Poonian, C3’s research director and Patricia
Davis C3 president and founder for the guidance, advice and opportunities they provide through their dedication to improving life in Malagasy communities.

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