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Prisons/Terrorism/Radicalisation/Deradicalisation in 15 Countries

Prisons/Terrorism/Radicalisation/Deradicalisation in 15 Countries

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The International Centre for the study of Radicalisation & Political Violence (ICSR)
Prisons & Terrorism – Radicalisation & De-Radicalisation in 15 Countries.
2010 policy report published by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR). In partnership with the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START)
The International Centre for the study of Radicalisation & Political Violence (ICSR)
Prisons & Terrorism – Radicalisation & De-Radicalisation in 15 Countries.
2010 policy report published by the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR). In partnership with the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START)

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Published by: MhaireMarscal on May 24, 2013
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07/15/2013

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Prisons and TerrorismRadicalisation andDe-radicalisation in 15 Countries
 A policy report published by the International Centre forthe Study of Radicalisationand Political Violence (ICSR)In partnership with theNational Consortium forthe Study of Terrorism andResponses to Terrorism(START)
 
 ABOUT THIS REPORT
 The author o this report is Peter R. Neumann.Its empirical basis are 15 country reports thatwere written by the ollowing experts: Omar Ashour (Algeria and Egypt); Laila Bokhari(Pakistan); Chris Boucek (Saudi-Arabia and Yemen); Andrew Coyle (United Kingdom); BoazGanor and Ophir Falk (Israel); Rohan Gunaratna(Singapore); Bob de Graa and Eelco Kessels(Netherlands); Arie Kruglanski and MichelleGeland (Philippines); Jean-Luc Marret (France);Sidney Jones (Indonesia); Marisa Porges(Aghanistan); Manuel Torres (Spain); andBert Useem (United States). The project could not have been undertakenwithout the kind and very generous support o:
•TheDepartmentofForeignAffairs
 and Trade, Australia
•TheNationalCoordinatorfor
Counterterrorism, The Netherlands
•TheOfficeforSecurityandCounterterrorism,
Home Oice, United Kingdom The views expressed in this report do notnecessarily relect the opinions o any o theabove mentioned experts, partners or sponsors.
CONTACT DETAILS
For questions, queries and additional copieso this report, please contact:ICSRKing’s College London138 – 142 StrandLondon WC2R 1HHUnited Kingdom
T.
+ 44 20 7848 2065
F.
+ 44 20 7848 2748
E.
mail@icsr.inoLike all other ICSR publications, this report canbe downloaded ree o charge rom the ICSRwebsite at
www.icsr.info
.© ICSR 2010
 
Introduction
•
 This report oers a wide-ranging analysis o the role prisons canplay in radicalising people – and in reorming them. In doing so, itexamines the policies and approaches o 15 countries, identiyingtrade-os and dilemmas but also principles and best practicesthat can help governments and policymakers spot new ideas andavoid costly and counterproductive mistakes.
•
Prisons matter. They have played an enormous role in thenarratives o every radical and militant movement in the modernperiod. They are ‘places o vulnerability’ in which radicalisation takesplace. Yet they have also served as incubators or peaceul changeand transormation.
•
Much o the current discourse about prisons and radicalisation isnegative. But prisons are not just a threat – they can play a positiverole in tackling problems o radicalisation and terrorism in societyas a whole. Many o the examples in this report demonstrate howprisons can become net contributors to the ght against terrorism.
Prison Regimes or Terrorists
•
 Terrorists are not ‘ordinary’ oenders. They oten use their time inprison to mobilise outside support, radicalise other prisoners, and– when given the opportunity – will attempt to recreate operationalcommand structures.
•
 There are no hard and ast rules about whether terrorist prisonersshould be concentrated together and/or separated rom the rest o the prisoner population. Most o the countries that were included inthe sample practice a policy o dispersal and (partial) concentration,which distributes terrorists among a small number o high securityprisons. Even within such mixed regimes, however, it rarely seemsto be a good idea to bring together leaders with ollowers and mixideologues with hangers-on.
•
 The ‘security rst’ approach o most countries results in missedopportunities to promote reorm. Many prison services seem tobelieve that the imperatives o security and reorm are incompatible.In many cases, however, demands or security and reorm are morelikely to complement than contradict each other.
•
Prison services should be more ambitious in promoting positiveinfuences inside prison, and develop more innovative approachesto acilitate prisoners’ transition back into mainstream society.
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