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Instant globalisation

Instant globalisation

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Published by BT Let's Talk
Until recently globalisation has had speed limits. Physical entities and ideas could only move as fast as the available modes of transportation. But with digitalisation we started to witness the death of distance. Speed limits began disappearing. And now commercial, social and political life is accelerating in unprecedented ways: the globalisation of products, ideas and issues is ‘instant’. So what does this mean for you?
Until recently globalisation has had speed limits. Physical entities and ideas could only move as fast as the available modes of transportation. But with digitalisation we started to witness the death of distance. Speed limits began disappearing. And now commercial, social and political life is accelerating in unprecedented ways: the globalisation of products, ideas and issues is ‘instant’. So what does this mean for you?

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Published by: BT Let's Talk on May 24, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/08/2013

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Instant globalisation
How organisations and government bodies are using technology to
be more exible and productive than ever before.
 
2
Globalisation, and the technology that’s drivingit, gives organisations and government bodies
the freedom to be more exible and productivethan ever before.
It gives them the ability to transcend the
traditional barriers of location, language andtime of day. It provides the ‘anywhere’ factor —the capacity to work, manufacture, access onlineservices and buy or sell anywhere.With the rules of play changed forever, thesame technology that’s fuelling globalisation ishelping organisations evolve their operations,build sustainability into their processes, shareinformation securely across any barriers and domore with less. Now’s the time to take advantageof this unstoppable trend, and start building fora better, global future.
Instant globalisation
 
Instant globalisation
3
Why it matters
The old restrictions on the way we work and operate arenow redundant. Organisations can choose the best of everything, no matter where in the globe it’s located.
Global efficiency
As globalisation extends operations, supply-chainvisibility rises up the priority order of many organisations.Organisations want access to data — in whatever forms itexists — across the supply chain, without fail.“Establishing end-to-end visibility over global supplychains is essential as supply chains are becomingincreasingly volatile and disrupted,” said Keith Sherry,general manager, Supply Chain Solutions, BT GlobalServices. He added: “Whether due to natural disasters,such as earthquakes or severe weather conditions, civil
unrest or the increasingly demanding global consumer,
visibility that extends fully upstream and downstream inthe supply chain helps deliver real-time, accurate in-storeavailability that maximises sales.”
We must ensure that the global
market is embedded in broadly-shared values and practices thatreflect global social needs, andthat all the world’s people sharethe benefits of globalisation.”
 
Kofi Annan
 
Former Secretary-General of the United Nations
Simple supply lines
When organisations have access to key information fromacross the supply chain they can increase agility andresponsiveness, reacting even faster to unforeseen eventsand making informed business decisions in order to avoiddisruption to their supply chains.
Océ
is one of the world’s leading providers of professionalprinting and document management services. Withheadquarters at Venlo in Holland, it has a global presenceand is active in more than 100 countries, employing some22,000 people worldwide.Corry Wouters, Vice President for ICT Operations at Océ,said: “As a global player, we need a fast and reliable widearea network (WAN) to enable our operating companiesworldwide to function cohesively through an integratedsupply chain.”However, the company’s WAN was based mainly on legacytechnology sourced from local service providers. Thisarrangement created short-falls in both bandwidth andflexibility, and offered only point-to-point connections. Itwas also increasingly expensive to manage and administer,so Océ decided to reassess its WAN requirements. CorryWouters said: “Our primary objectives were to increasebandwidth, reduce cost, and improve network resilienceand flexibility — while working with a single Europeansupplier.”Now the company outsources the management of WANservices on its MPLS platform to BT. The new network serves80 locations in 20 countries, enabling different traffictypes to share a single, converged network. It also allowsimportant traffic, such as voice and video, to be prioritisedover less time-sensitive data such as email and web.BT’s MPLS network provides much higher bandwidth,improving application performance and boostingproductivity. In addition, with any-to-any connectivityreplacing the former point-to-point arrangements,network resilience is significantly improved; costs aredown too. Corry Wouters said: “We were saving comparedto our previous network costs. And because we haveconsolidated our network with a single supplier we aresaving even more through efficient management andadministration.”

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