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Training for Cross-Cultural Ministries 99

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministries 99

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Published by Sammis Reachers
Subtitle
Volume 1999, Number 1

Subject
Mission Training

Description
Occasional bulletin of the International Missionary Training Fellowship, a global network of centers and individuals dedicated to training for cross-cultural mission. No longer in publication, these bulletins contain some valuable wisdom gathered over th

Abstract
Occasional bulletin of the International Missionary Training Fellowship, a global network of centers and individuals dedicated to training for cross-cultural mission. No longer in publication, these bulletins contain some valuable wisdom gathered over th

Content
Send Me! Preparation and Training PATH: ESSENTIEL STEPS IN THE PROCESS; Steve Hoke and Bill Taylor
Using a Regional Platform to Address Relevant Issues; Jonathan Lewis
Challenging Trainersto Equip Tentmakers; Ben Bester and Stefanus Snyman
You Make the Call; Richard Lewis
South African Missions Venture Holds Curriculum Design Workshop; Bayo Famonuri
Designing the Training Curriculum for the World Mission Centre; John Kayser

- http://theimtn.org/main/
Subtitle
Volume 1999, Number 1

Subject
Mission Training

Description
Occasional bulletin of the International Missionary Training Fellowship, a global network of centers and individuals dedicated to training for cross-cultural mission. No longer in publication, these bulletins contain some valuable wisdom gathered over th

Abstract
Occasional bulletin of the International Missionary Training Fellowship, a global network of centers and individuals dedicated to training for cross-cultural mission. No longer in publication, these bulletins contain some valuable wisdom gathered over th

Content
Send Me! Preparation and Training PATH: ESSENTIEL STEPS IN THE PROCESS; Steve Hoke and Bill Taylor
Using a Regional Platform to Address Relevant Issues; Jonathan Lewis
Challenging Trainersto Equip Tentmakers; Ben Bester and Stefanus Snyman
You Make the Call; Richard Lewis
South African Missions Venture Holds Curriculum Design Workshop; Bayo Famonuri
Designing the Training Curriculum for the World Mission Centre; John Kayser

- http://theimtn.org/main/

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Published by: Sammis Reachers on May 30, 2013
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PREPARATION AND TRAINING PATH:ESSENTIAL STEPS IN THE PROCESS
by Steve Hoke and Bill Taylor The following excerpts are from the new WEF Missions Commission title,
 Send Me!Your Journey to the Nations
, by Steve Hoke and Bill Taylor. This practical manual targets people, both young and older, who are willing to go as missionaries but are unsure how to get there. The article should be read with the understanding that the two authors are writing for a North American audience. Hence, some of the items are par- ticular to that context. However, the general structure of the publication has validity in many cultures. The book may be ordered  from William Carey Library, P.O. Box 40129, Pasadena, CA 91114, phone 1-800- MISSION, 1-626-798-0819, e-mail <orders@ WCLBooks.com>. 144 pp. US$7.95.
T
here are three major phases of missionary preparation and train-ing. Each of these has a number of steps that go together. They can beclustered in the following manner:
Phase 1: Getting Ready  Stretching 
Personal spiritual formation(being)
Body boost: getting on-the-job experience at home(doing)
Exposure to other cultures(doing)
Basic education (knowing)
Phase 2: Getting There  Linking 
Church and agency contactand candidacy 
Ministry assignment search
Hands-on missionary training
Phase 3: Getting Established  Bonding 
 Apprenticeships and internships
Lifelong learning
Finishing strong
PHASE 1: Getting Ready  Stretching
Step 1: Personal spiritual formation 
 Who you areyour character andspiritual formation as a disciple of JesusChristis essential to the role you willplay and to what you do in missions.Clarifying your basic commitment, your call, and your spiritual gifts and mak-ing sure your spiritual foundation issolid are necessary first steps to ensurean effective journey. Finding a personalmentor early on in this journey is foun-dational to starting well.
Step 2: Body boost: Getting on-the-job experience at home 
Understanding your churchsunique missions vision and finding your place and gifted role in it arecritical to your ultimate effectiveness inextending the church into other cul-tures. Making disciples in your homeculture will hone your ministry skillsand help sharpen your spiritual gifted-ness before serving in a cross-culturalsetting. Investing financially in missions will accelerate your own education andestablish a lifelong habit.
Step 3: Exposure to other cultures 
Growing up in only one culturelimits our ability to understand others,appreciate diversity, and learn other languages. Frankly, being mono-cultural is really boring for todaysglobal citizen in a pluralistic society. Sogain some early cross-cultural expo-sure. It will stretch your mental, physi-cal, and spiritual muscles and will help you understand and accept people of other cultures. Its also an invaluablecrucible for testing your gifts, your pas-sions, your dreams, and your capacity for a longer-term commitment.
Step 4: Basic education 
 Academic preparation for a short- or long-term ministry needs to be custom-ized to your experience, skills, andgifts. What kind of formal training andeducation do you need for missionstoday, whether at the level of voca-tional or professional equipping? Whatsteps can you take at this point that willbroaden your worldview and enrich your basic educational background?
PHASE 2: Getting There  Linking
Step 5: Church and agency contact and candidacy 
 What sending group or team(church or agency) is the best fit for youas the vehicle for service? Your best work is not a solo effort. What kind of team do you need to make you mosteffective and to help you grow themost? What kind of team leader do youneed to stay focused and effective? What are the options? How do youthink through the various possibilities?
Step 6: Ministry assignment search 
Related to the question of the mis-sion sending group are the questions of location, people group, and specificrole on a church planting team that Godis asking you to fulfill in reaching others with the gospel. Who are they? Whereare they? How can your gifts be used
Volume 99, Number 1August 1999 Occasional bulletin of the INTERNATIONAL MISSIONARY TRAINING FELLOWSHIP,a global network of programs and individuals dedicated to training for cross-cultural ministry.Editor: Jonathan Lewis, PO Box WEF, Wheaton IL 60189, USA; E-mail: <JonathanLewis@xc.org> 
MissionsCommission
Send Me!
continued on page 2 Training  Vol. 99/1
1
 
in reaching those people or in buildingup the national church? What is your lifelong assignment in Gods overallgame plan?
Step 7: Hands-on missionary training 
Language and culture learning arepart of a missionarys Basic Trainingin the hands-on and practical side of living among and relating to people who need the Lord. What are the vari-ous ways to gain the most practical skilltraining outside the classroom?
PHASE 3: Getting Established  Bonding
Step 8: Apprenticeships and internships 
Effective missionaries dont justemerge fully formed from their educa-tional experience. On-the-job ministry either at home or on the field tests what youve learned, provides models inministry, and helps you develop your own approaches for telling the storyand establishing vital faith for commu-nities (churches). Mentoring in initialministry ensures a healthy start.
Step 9: Lifelong learning 
 When missionaries stop learning,they can wither or get stuck. We wantto stay alive and growing during thisseason of our life. Establishing a life-long learning pattern early in your ca-reer is essential to finishing well over the long haul.
Step 10: Finishing strong 
Understanding what it means to fin-ish well is crucial, particularly in anactivistic Christian subculture that val-ues high accomplishment and activity. Why do so many leaders tend not tofinish well, and how can we anticipatethese pitfalls? We want to help youintentionalize your spiritual develop-ment so that you can grow stronger from cross-cultural service rather than weaker, and all during your Christianpilgrimage you will walk the long pathof obedience in the same direction  whether you are in missions or not.Charting your journey is not somuch about planning a vacation as it isabout becoming intentional in joiningGods foreign policy. Its taking time topray and plan how you are going to getactively involved. Its about taking spe-cific steps forward rather than beingshoved around sideways by peer andcareer pressure. Its about moving fromthe grandstand to the playing field, whether as a grower or a goer. Your own journey will be unique. And chart-ing your journey will be a life-changingprocess. These 10 steps will help youtransform your ideas and commitmentinto a powerful plan for spiritualchange.
A second excerpt from the book 
EQUIPPING FOR THE LONG HAUL:GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR ADEQUATEPRE-FIELD MISSIONARY TRAINING
1. Seek equipping/training spe-cifically applicable to your ministry goals.
Choose your missionary minis-try: evangelist, church planter, relief and development worker, leader devel-oper, youth worker, tentmaker,teacher, coach/mentor, writer, nurse,doctor, medical technician, graphic art-ist, computer wizard, radio/televisionproducerwhatever. No matter what you desire to do, youll need training inorder to serve with long-term effective-ness and fruitfulness.
2. Seek equipping/training that  will shape you in three major areas:character, skills, and knowledge.
These three components woven to-gether will equip you for significantministry.Many people think that a Bible col-lege or seminary will do the completejob of preparing them for missions serv-ice. It wont. Most formal schools tendto focus on knowledge first and sec-ondly on skills for ministry. Very few have distinguished themselves for their commitment to character development,spirituality, and relationality. You do need a strong componentof knowledge for effective ministry. Butit should be knowledge that is directedto produce godliness, character forma-tion, spirituality, and ministry skills. Ask your pastor or spiritual mentor how best to prepare for missions.
3. Seek equipping/training in non-formal, formal, and informal contexts.
All three of these aspects of learning are very important, though wetend to think that training must comein formal school contexts.Non-formal education refers to out-of-the-classroom learning, yet it is de-signed and purposeful. It includessupervised field trips, internships, anddiscipling/mentoring relationships.Some non-formal equipping is taught;some is simply caught.Informal education refers to the dy-namics of living, observing, and learn-ing within community. Much of this iscaught.Formal education is what we know best. Its what we call school planned, supervised, academic, primar-ily theoretical, classroom oriented,graded by examinations and gradu-ations and degrees. Certain compo-nents of knowledge are best and mostefficiently communicated in formal set-tings.Now think in terms of seven differ-ent learning contexts that mold a futuremissionary:1. The home shapes us.2. The job/marketplace teaches andhones skills.3. The church stimulates develop-ment of character, ministry skills, and adegree of important knowledge.4. Formal schools focus on knowl-edge and some skills.5. Mission agencies take a carefullook at character, skills, and knowledgeand may offer their own specific equip-ping.6. The future national church youmay serve with will shape you in allareas of your life.7. Other kinds of interpersonal rela-tionships mold us.Now go back to the character, skill,and knowledge dimensions. Where arethese best learned in relation to theseven learning contexts? This exercisecan help you determine the best routeto follow in your own equipping/train-ing process as you contemplate mis-sions.
Why Am I Telling You All This?
 What Im trying to establish is that we need effective (and efficient) equip-ping/training for all types of cross-cultural ministry. And the longer the
SEND ME!
continued from page 1continued on page 3 
2
Training  Vol. 99/1
 
ministry time commitment, the moreserious the equipping/training must be.Dont try to cut it short!Im not saying you have to get amasters or doctorate in missions before you can serve cross-culturally. But Iknow of very few experienced mission-aries who regret their training, even if it meant years of study, discipline, and waiting. It taught them perseveranceand spiritual maturity, equipping themfor effective, hang-in-there, cross-cultural ministry. Years of training have equipped thelong-term missionaries I know for long-term, cross-cultural ministry. And they  were there long enough to enjoy thefruit of their work. Of course it wastough. Yes, they got sick. What did they expect? But they saw God at work, andheaven will be full of worshipers of the Lamb who are there because some-one left home for years and crossedgeographical, language, and culturalbarriers to present the powerful, super-natural, living Jesus Christ to people who had not known Him.
USING A REGIONALPLATFORM TO ADDRESSRELEVANT ISSUES
by Jonathan Lewis 
W
here can missionary trainers findanswers to the questions they face?Most of us struggle in isolation withissues that might be resolved if we worked in closer cooperation withother trainers and training programs.The following report is a synthesis of the thinking produced during a recentCentral American regional missionary trainers consultation.In 1991, COMIBAM, Latin Americasregional missions alliance, and the WEFMissions Commission sponsored thefirst of a series of regional consultationsfor Latin America in Guatemala City.Eight years later, the COMIBAM leader-ship convened the second regionalconsultation to deal with current issues.On April 23, 1999, 30 key mobilizersand trainers from Guatemala, El Salva-dor, and Honduras met to address thefollowing three issues which were se-lected by a representative group of national leaders during a pre-consult-ation meeting in February:1. How can we convince pastors of the importance of missionary training?2. How do we form and strengthenalliances among the different trainingprograms?3. Should we establish a set of standards for the Spanish version of thePerspectives on the World ChristianMovement course that is being offered widely in Central America?
Convincing Pastors
Luis Marti, Pastor of the MiramonteBaptist Church in El Salvador and him-self a former missionary to Spain,brought the exposition on How do weconvince pastors of the importanceof missionary training? He led parti-cipants in the identification of thepossible reasons that pastors arent con- vinced of the need for training andsuggested some possible solutions. Among the reasons listed were:1. Pastors have not been trainedthemselves and thus do not value mis-sionary training.2. The pastors sense of responsi-bility is limited to the evangelization of his sphere of influence.3. A divorce exists between thepractical training received in the churchand the formal training offered by themissionary training center/program;pastors believe they can train mission-aries without specialized programs.4. Training programs do not cor-respond to the pastors reality or contextmissiological training is theo-retical and impractical, often taught by those who have little or no field expe-rience.5. Programs/centers have been cre-ated without market analysis, themarket is small, the product is cannedand inappropriate, and it is presentedas one size fits all training.These factors all add up to the factthat pastors do not generally value mis-sionary training and are unwilling topay the costs associated with offeringspecialized programs.
Overcoming barriers 
Pastor Marti suggested some waysthat trainers might overcome some of these barriers:1. Efforts in training should be di-rected towards churches and pastors who are already committed to missionsand whose mission development re-quires the missionary trainingothers will follow.2. A closer dialogue needs to befostered between the local church andthe training institutions. The programsshould be created together with theparticipation of key pastors, and thetrainers should be willing to offer their training in the churches.
c
Participants in the Central American Missionary Trainers Consultation continued on page 4 
SEND ME!
continued from page 2 Training  Vol. 99/1
3

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