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The INSIDER

The INSIDER

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Published by U.S. Army RDECOM
February 2013 workforce newsletter. We develop technology and engineering solutions to make America's Soldiers Stronger. Smarter. Safer.
February 2013 workforce newsletter. We develop technology and engineering solutions to make America's Soldiers Stronger. Smarter. Safer.

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Published by: U.S. Army RDECOM on May 30, 2013
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08/19/2014

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
DIRECTOR’S CORNER
Speaking with one voice, Page 2
RDECOM NEWSBRIEFS
News and information fromacross the organization, Page 3
SPOTLIGHT
Edwards runs AMRDEC, Page 4
 ARMY DISPLAYS FUTUREOF GROUND-VEHICLETECHNOLOGIES
Page 6
MICROSTRUCTURES FOLDUNDER A BEAM OF LIGHT
Page 8
RESEARCHERS DEVELOPROBOT INTELLIGENCE
Page 9
RDECOM DEVELOPS HEALTHIERSMOKES GRENADES
Page 10
 ARMY SCIENTISTS FINDSOLUTION FOR TESTINGBODY ARMOR
Page 12
TESTING SEEKS DATAON MODIFIED GUNNERPROTECTION DESIGN
Page 16
ENGINEERS TEST RAPIDNERVE AGENT DETECTORS
Page 20
 ARMY WAR COLLEGEFELLOWS VISIT NATICK
Page 22
FEBRUARY 2013
ISSUE NO. 8
Army engineers design, build roadwaythreat detection system
The Shadow Class Infrared Spectral Sensor-Ground, known as SCISSOR-G, could allow Soldiers on aroute clearance patrol to achieve greater standoff ranges from possible improvised explosive devices duringmissions. (U.S. Army photo)
By Dan LafontaineRDECOM Public Affairs
 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md.
Explosives along roadways remain anunrelenting hazard for deployed Soldiers.U.S. Army engineers have developeda system for detecting possible threats byidentifying potential threat locations onunimproved roads. The Shadow Class Infrared SpectralSensor-Ground, known as SCISSOR-G,could allow Soldiers on a route clearancepatrol to achieve greater standoff rangesduring missions, said Jim Hilger, chief of theSignal and Image Processing Branch withinthe U.S. Army Communications -- ElectronicsResearch, Development and EngineeringCenter’s Night Vision and Electronic SensorsDirectorate, at Fort Belvoir, Va.CERDEC is one of the seven research anddevelopment organizations that comprisethe U.S. Army Research, Development andEngineering Command. The SCISSOR-G is a complementarysystem to radars. It can perform region of interest cueing of threats at greater standoff distances, which can be further interrogatedby the radar as the vehicle gets closer to thethreat, Hilger said. The system provides aroute clearance patrol with increased standoff range for potential threat detection.“If you can increase the threat detection infront of the vehicle, you give the operators a
CONTINUED ON PAGE 20
 
2
FEBRUARY 2013 – ISSUE NO. 8
By Dale A. OrmondNow that I’ve been with RDECOM for ayear, I am finally starting to understand theorganization, its mission and the vital role itplays to provide our Soldiers with the deci-sive technological edge.Frankly, we face challenges. If one wereto look at the current enterprise with a criti-cal eye, it appears fractured with competingnames, logos and brand identities. Our per-ceived collective value is largely unknownand underutilized. Stakeholders don’t seethe connection between the state-of-the-art services we provide and the depth of knowledge and expertise behind the possi-bilities. Often, stakeholders don’t recognizethe overarching RDECOM brand becausethey perceive that the centers and lab oper-ate as self-sustaining entities.I firmly believe it’s necessary to bring theentire organization under one identity. Inorder for the Army to make the best deci-sions in science and technology, we needto speak and act with one voice.Rebranding will strengthen our ability tomove forward in providing science, tech-nology and engineering solutions acrossa broad spectrum. It will facilitate under-standing of the science and engineeringexpertise that resides in this command.Defining a single brand will reinforce col-laboration across our enterprise with theadded potential benefit of gaining wide con-gressional base support.Right now we have the RDECOM nameand logo and we have seven sub-organiza-tions with different names and logos. Ourchallenge is to present the larger value andnarrative that the Army Materiel Commandand RDECOM bring to the fight.We’re looking at a couple of options.One way would be for all organizations toassume the RDECOM name and logo witha distinction for its capability, for exam-ple “RDECOM Armament,” or “RDECOMGround Vehicle Systems.” This path has many advantages.RDECOM is known, and to some extenthas brand awareness as the parent organi-zation for the centers and lab. RDECOM’sunrecognized equity can be addressed andenhanced through rebranding the centersand lab by shaping and reframing the sto-ry. We would have the opportunity to unifycenters and lab under the RDECOM brandpackaged with compelling narrative.A second course of action would create anew identity for the whole enterprise: ArmyResearch and Engineering Laboratory. Thecenters and lab would be differentiatedby capability, such as “AREL Chemical &Biological,” or “AREL Soldier Systems.” This approach would give the entire en-terprise an opportunity to establish a newdirection, speak with a new voice and buildawareness together.A complete rebranding of the enterprisecreates external perception of alignment toother Department of Defense entities, suchas the Air Force Research Laboratory andthe Naval Research Laboratory.Using the word “laboratory” in the nameemphasizes the discovery and innovationaspects of what we do, as well as gener-ates resonance external to the Army. Itwould offer flexibility with additional marketopportunities. Finally using a new namewould give the organization an opportunityto establish a new direction and make acomplete break from RDECOM.Becoming a laboratory would be a pow-erful proposition. In fact, given the breadthof our research and development portfolios,we would perhaps be the biggest such lab-oratory in the United States. Both optionsare being given serious considerations byour leadership at the AMC.Regardless of our name, our story doesnot need to be manufactured; it’s just notable to be communicated effectively underthe current environment, which is anotherreason why we need to align ourselvesstrategically. I believe we must continue tobreakdown stovepipes and build a single,unifying corporate culture. Once we godown this path, we may realize the vision of Gen. Paul J. Kern, commander of the AMC,when he created RDECOM in 2004.In aligning our strategic vision for the fu-ture with our organizational culture, we willenhance stakeholder awareness of our ca-pabilities so they fully understand the valuewe provide to the Army. The future of Army readiness is in ourhands. Continue to do great things. It is mydistinct honor to serve with you.
RELATED LINKS
Biography:http://go.usa.gov/vK8Facebook: http://on.fb.me/MKsWlo Twitter: http://twitter.com/DaleOrmond
U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Director Dale Ormond (center) visitswith students during a robotics competition leading up to the U.S. Army All-American Bowl outside the Alamodome in San Antonio Jan. 4. (U.S. Army photo by Conrad Johnson)
Director’s Corner: Speaking with one voice
 
3
RDECOM’s THE INSIDER
 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND,Md. —
 The Army promoted Staff Sgt.Steven McGloin to the rank of staff ser-geant Jan. 1. Command Sgt. Maj. Lebert
Beharie, senior noncommissioned ofcer for 
RDECOM, congratulated McGloin on his pro-motion. McGloin is assigned to the
 
ofce of 
the RDECOM command sergeant major.
 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md.
 — Brig. Gen. Daniel Hughes (left), deputycommanding general of RDECOM, receiveda Legion of Merit Jan. 9. from Maj. Gen.Harold Greene, deputy for acquisition and
systems management, Ofce of the Assistant
Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logisticsand Technology). Hughes earned the awardfor his service as director of System of Systems Integration from October 2011 toOctober 2012.
 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md.
 The Army honored three civilian employeesDec. 19 for volunteering to mentor youthin science, technology, engineering andmathematics. RDECOM Director DaleOrmond (left) congratulates Lauren McNew.ECBC Public Affairs
 ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md.
 The U.S. Army Edgewood ChemicalBiological Center received a letter of gratitude from U.S. Ambassador to AlbaniaAlexander A. Arvizu Nov. 21. The notethanked the organization for a successfuldemilitarization operation that destroyed arecently discovered stockpile of chemicalmunitions in Tirana, Albania.“Thanks to your professionalism andexpertise, these hazardous chemicalsare no longer a potential danger to theAlbanian or American people. I havereceived profuse thanks from the Ministryof Defense and other Albanian governmentofficials, and wanted to pass on theirappreciation as well. Once again, thankyou for a job well done!” Arvizu wrote.Collaborative ECBC’s ChemicalBiological Application and Risk ReductionBusiness Unit, the Central Laboratory,Logistics Brigade and the Albanian ArmedForces led to the successful destructionof 11 chemical agents during two weeksin July. CBARR personnel implementedan environmentally sound infrastructurein Tirana, setting up the analyticalcapabilities and engineering controls toensure the safe destruction of chemicalwarfare agents.“We were incredibly appreciative of the on-site rapport we developed withthe Albanian laboratory staff,” said RayDiberardo, CBARR project manager. “Wewere able to establish a good workingrelationship that enabled us to execute theoperation safely.”CBARR personnel assessed siteconditions and designated locations forstorage, detoxification and analysis of chemical agents. Once the site passeda pre-operations survey that verifiedsupplies and safety protocols were inplace, the team conducted a chemicalanalysis on each of the agents to confirmchemical identity, quantify chemicalconcentrations and establish a baselinefor which destruction goals could bemeasured.“Sometimes the challenges of workingin a foreign country are being able tocommunicate and work effectively withlaboratory and support personnel, butit was a natural partnership with theAlbanians,” Diberardo said. “We are happyto have had the opportunity to providesupport and lead international efforts.”
RELATED LINKS
ECBC: https://www.ecbc.army.mil
U.S. ambassador thanks Army for demilitarization effort in Albania
The U.S. Army demilitarization effort safely destroyed 11 chemical agents during a two-weekproject in Tirana, Albania. (U.S. Army photo)
RDECOM SOLDIER GETS PROMOTED ARMY RECOGNIZES DEPUTY CG ARMY HONORS STEM VOLUNTEERS

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