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CCYA Immigration Toolkit

CCYA Immigration Toolkit

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From New Netherland to New York, immigrants from every part of the world have made their home in our state. Community Conversations invites New Yorkers to explore our shared history as immigrants and the descendants of immigrants, and to discuss the ways that immigration continues to shape the experience of being American today. Each conversation uses a short text as a starting point for discussions about cultural understanding and our roles as active citizens in a diverse and democratic society.
From New Netherland to New York, immigrants from every part of the world have made their home in our state. Community Conversations invites New Yorkers to explore our shared history as immigrants and the descendants of immigrants, and to discuss the ways that immigration continues to shape the experience of being American today. Each conversation uses a short text as a starting point for discussions about cultural understanding and our roles as active citizens in a diverse and democratic society.

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Published by: New York Council for the Humanities on May 31, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/09/2014

 
 
www.nyhumanities.org/conversations
Immigration
 
 
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Thank you for hosting a
Community Conversation forYoung Adults
!
Overview
Community Conversations
are stand-alone, text-based discussions led by a facilitatorfrom the local community. Each toolkit includes a text that tackles an importantaspect of American life and encourages community dialogue.
Structure
 Your
Community Conversation
should last between 60 and 90 minutes withoutinterruption. Discussions should be guided by a facilitator and focused on the textand the theme.Hold your conversation in a room where a group of 10-30 participants can hear eachother clearly. Use the tips sheets for host sites and facilitators included in this toolkitfor ideas about how to encourage everyone to participate in the discussion.
Facilitator
A good facilitator is the key to making a
Community Conversation
successful. Thefacilitator should be someone in your community who enjoys working with people, isinterested in what others have to say, and believes in the merit of conversation-based programs. The facilitator does
not
need to be someone with an advanceddegree in the humanities, but rather someone who has some experience leadinopen conversations and who is enthusiastic about learning how to facilitate. Weencourage all prospective facilitators to attend one of the Council’s free facilitationwebinars* to learn more about best practices for guiding successful and meaningfuldiscussions.
*Facilitators at featured sites must attend a facilitation webinar.
Included inthistoolkit:
“The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus and Anonymous Poem from AngelIsland Immigration StationDiscussion Questions for “The New Colossus” and Anonymous Poem
 
Tips for FacilitatinTips for Hosting Sample ScheduleParticipant EvaluationKeep the Conversation Going Partnerspage 3page 4page 5page 6page 7page 8page 9page 10
Community Conversations
provides an opportunity for people to come together forthoughtful discussion and dialogue about their shared values as Americans—past,present, and future. Focused on central themes in American life such as service, freedomand democracy,
Community Conversations
allows New Yorkers to join in discussions thatoffer an alternative to received wisdom and provide the chance to take part in a sharednational dialogue.
 
From New Netherland to New York, immigrants from every part of the world have madetheir home in our state.
Community Conversations
invites New Yorkers to explore ourshared history as immigrants and the descendants of immigrants, and to discuss theways that immigration continues to shape the experience of being American today. Eachconversation uses a short text as a starting point for discussions about culturalunderstanding and our roles as active citizens in a diverse and democratic society.
New York Council for the Humanities | T 212.233.1131 | www.nyhumanities.org 
 
 
 
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New York Council for the Humanities | T 212.233.1131 | www.nyhumanities.org 
 
“The New Colossus” by EmmaLazarus, 1883Anonymous Poem from Angel IslandImmigration Station, 1910-1940“The New Colossus”
by Emma Lazarus, 1883Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,With conquering limbs astride from land to land;Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall standA mighty woman with a torch, whose flameIs the imprisoned lightning, and her nameMother of Exiles. From her beacon-handGlows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes commandThe air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame."Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries sheWith silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"
[This poem was engraved on a bronze plaque on the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty in 1903.]
 
Anonymous Poem
from Angel Island Immigration Station, 1910-1940There are tens of thousands of poems on these wallsThey are all cries of suffering and sadnessThe day I am rid of this prison and become successfulI must remember that this chapter once existedI must be frugal in my daily needsNeedless extravagance usually leads to ruinAll my compatriots should remember ChinaOnce you have made some small gains,you should return home early.- Written by one from Heungshan
[From 1910 to 1940, the Angel Island Immigration Station (the “Ellis Island of the West”) processedapproximately 1 million Asian immigrants entering into the United States. Due to the restrictions of the ChineseExclusion Act of 1882, many immigrants spent years on the island waiting for entry.]
 
Please read these two poems together as one text; they were selected to be in conversation with one another.

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