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Table Of Contents

1.2 lntemalism versus externalism
1.3 Further development ofinternalism
1.4 Further problems with desert
1.5 Positive desert
2.1 Determinism, 'hard' and 'soft'
2.2 Frankfurt cases
2.3 Libertarianism
2.4 Determinism and morality
3.2 Retributivism: a first look
3.3 Peter French and vengeance theory
3.4 Corlett's account: exposition
3.5 Corlett's account: critique
3.6 Negative retributivism and some thought experiments
NOTES
4.1 Utilitarianism in general
4.2 The basic utilitarian arguments
5.1 Guiding Principles
5.2 The S-score algorithm
5.3 From S-scores to actual sentences
5.4 Case studies for the application of the algorithm
5.5 Exculpation
5. 7 Punishment within the family
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Sher versus Rawls
6.3 Distributive justice
MORALITY AND BLAME
7.1 Hostility to wrongdoers
7.2 Sher on blame
REFERENCES
INDEX
P. 1
Moral Desert: A Critique

Moral Desert: A Critique

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Published by RowmanLittlefield
In Moral Desert, Howard Simmons notes that the idea that we deserve to be praised or rewarded for good behavior and blamed or punished when we act badly seems central to everyone's moral deliberation and practices. Simmons subjects this assumption to critical scrutiny. He argues that in a wide range of cases it is almost impossible to know the extent of people's moral responsibility, and indeed that it may be a complete delusion. He attacks the still-popular theory of retributive punishment, with special reference to the views of Peter French and J. Angelo Corlett. Simmons does not conclude that punishment is always unjustified, but insists that any justification should relate to its real world consequences. State punishment should be inflicted according to strict consequentialist precepts, and the author provides systematic principles for determining an appropriate sentence and for deciding when offenders should be excused. He also considers the implications of his views for distributive justice and personal morality.
In Moral Desert, Howard Simmons notes that the idea that we deserve to be praised or rewarded for good behavior and blamed or punished when we act badly seems central to everyone's moral deliberation and practices. Simmons subjects this assumption to critical scrutiny. He argues that in a wide range of cases it is almost impossible to know the extent of people's moral responsibility, and indeed that it may be a complete delusion. He attacks the still-popular theory of retributive punishment, with special reference to the views of Peter French and J. Angelo Corlett. Simmons does not conclude that punishment is always unjustified, but insists that any justification should relate to its real world consequences. State punishment should be inflicted according to strict consequentialist precepts, and the author provides systematic principles for determining an appropriate sentence and for deciding when offenders should be excused. He also considers the implications of his views for distributive justice and personal morality.

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Publish date: 2010
Added to Scribd: May 31, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780761850953
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07/16/2014

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