Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Their Game by Madhushala Senaratne

Their Game by Madhushala Senaratne

Ratings: (0)|Views: 153|Likes:
The following short story was awarded the third prize in the 2013 Creative Writing Competition (short story category) of the English Writers Cooperative of Sri Lanka and published in Channels, Volume 19 - 2013 (published by the English Writers Cooperative in Sri Lanka, September 2013)

Amal was twice the age of the other boys. But, at 17, he behaved and thought like a 12 year old. He loved cricket, and often played with the neighbourhood boys, Skanda, Farouk and Mevan, among them. They didn't really speak each other's language, but there was an understanding among them, a shared unity and goal...

The following short story was awarded the third prize in the 2013 Creative Writing Competition (short story category) of the English Writers Cooperative of Sri Lanka and published in Channels, Volume 19 - 2013 (published by the English Writers Cooperative in Sri Lanka, September 2013)

Amal was twice the age of the other boys. But, at 17, he behaved and thought like a 12 year old. He loved cricket, and often played with the neighbourhood boys, Skanda, Farouk and Mevan, among them. They didn't really speak each other's language, but there was an understanding among them, a shared unity and goal...

More info:

Published by: Madhushala Senaratne on Jun 02, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/05/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Their game
Writer: Madhushala Senaratne
The evening sun had set the sky in a sudden blaze. Saku peeped through the half-open window atthe loud cheer outside. The neighbourhood boys were playing their game of cricket. Her brother,Amal, had scored two runs and was waving his bat to the five-or-so spectators cheering him.Amal was twice the age of the other boys. But, at 17, he behaved and thought like a 12 year old.Usually at these cricket matches, he was the wicket keeper, even then, with a more able boystanding behind him, catching anything he’d let go of.Yet, today, it was different. He was not the wicket keeper. He batted, ran, fell, stood up and ranagain. All in all, he played six runs, taking his team’s score to 24. This was five-a-side cricket,five overs per team, five balls per over.Saku smiled to herself, and turned on the 6 o’clock news. It was gloomy and usual. She let her thoughts wonder.She envied Amal at times. He was a dreamer and full of optimism. It was, maybe, because hecouldn’t fully grasp the complexities of life. He had all the attention, the pity. Amal’s friendstried to be accommodating with him, but he had his moods. Sometimes, he was friendly. At other times, he’d hardly talk or look. On certain days, he’d babble and throw a tantrum when othersdidn’t respond or understand.Saku sighed. She kept glancing at the window, hoping he would stay calm, today.A sudden bang at the front door, burst into her thoughts.
 Akka, akka,
come, watch,” Amal was calling her. There was a small break until the other sidecame to bat and Amal was being guided towards the house by Farouk, one of his friends, whowas today in the opposing team.“Ok, ok, I’ll come” Saku sighed dutifully.Amal beamed and walked back, holding firmly on to Farouk’s hands.Saku smiled as she walked towards the field. She saw Skanda, captain of Amal’s team, pacingthe grass and calling impatiently to his team, “C’mon now, let’s play,
 Enna, enna.”
 
Skanda always took his duties to heart. Saku wasn’t surprised. He was the only one playing for aschool team. He was only 11, and had settled well in Colombo just recently, having lived muchof his life in the deep North. He was friendly now, and smiled a lot.Saku took her place on the grass. A few overs later though, she plunged into her thoughts. Theevening news had been disturbing. There was hatred brewing again among different groups.Many feared a repeat of bloody events that occurred decades ago. Some predicted even worsedisasters. There was also talk of a resolution against the country on alleged violations. Therewere reports of a spate of murders in an isolated village, only miles away from Colombo.A sudden roar pierced into her take on the evening news.There was some celebration going on.
 Akka
, I’m bowling,” Amal shouted in her direction, as Saku glared in surprise.This was certainly his day. It wasn’t often that he had the ball on his hand and was able to set thefield the way he wanted.“What’s the score?” she asked.“Last over, five runs to win,” he yelled.“Go Amal,” Saku screamed, her feet slightly cold, as her brother ran in for the first ball.“…..Aaaand that travels wide off stump,” one of the boys bellowed into a plastic bottle,assuming the duties of a commentator.Amal held his head in agony.Saku was surprised. It was hardly ever that he thought he did something wrong. Thankfully, thismatch gave no extra runs for wides or no-balls. Just an extra ball.Saku watched Mevan, another boy from the team, walking over to her brother and patting him onthe back. Amal nodded and walked to his mark, his head bent, in deep thought.Turning at the mark, he ran in, and let go of the ball, this time, slowly and with purpose. The batsmen settled for one.The batting side cheered. Every run mattered. They now needed just four runs off four balls.
 
Collecting the ball, Amal took his mark again. Running in fast this time, he fired the ball at hisopponent.The screams were deafening. Amal stared in disgust. The ball was running towards the coconuttrees in the far distance – the agreed boundary.But, racing in its direction was Mevan, who, as he inched closer, plunged himself across thegrass, in desperation. Saku stood on tiptoe, as the boy jumped, mere steps away from the boundary, rubbing at his knees - possibly some scratches - and threw the ball at Amal, whocaught it safe, and flung it at the wickets. But the batsmen were safely home.Yet they had managed only two runs, and this was enough for both sides to celebrate.Saku nibbled at her fingernails. There were cheers from all directions. Suddenly, more people –  parents and siblings of the boys had gathered around. Amal tossed the ball into the air aswalked to his mark again, his face, expressionless. The atmosphere was tense. The sky had turned a fierce red.Amal ran in, faster this time, and let go of the ball, with force, leaving little choice to the batsman, who promptly planted his bat in front his legs, shielding himself. A strictly orchestrated chorus of 
‘ah’s
rang across the playing field.The fielding side jumped in delight.Amal walked towards his mark, a sly smile cast over his face, rubbing the tennis ball against histrousers. This was greeted by hearty laughter. Saku recalled the many times he’d closely studyevery action of his cricketing heroes on TV.Her heart pounded as Amal stormed into the pitch once again, this time, bowling straight and into the stump. He did so in such meticulous fashion, it was as if he had been practicing thismoment his entire life.
Chatas!
It all happened too fast. There was no replay. Saku looked to the others for commentary. A lineof gloomy faces stared back at her, as Amal danced along the pitch, waving his hands, and therest of his team plunged on him, in celebration.“Bowled him!!!” the commentators yelled above the cheer, as the batsman walked back, his head low, and handed over the bat to his teammate, quietly nodding him luck.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->