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A Revolutionary Life: Enrico Malatesta

A Revolutionary Life: Enrico Malatesta

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Published by emilbh
Skrevet af Guy Alfred Aldred, oprindelig udgivet i 1940 af Word Library
Skrevet af Guy Alfred Aldred, oprindelig udgivet i 1940 af Word Library

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Published by: emilbh on Apr 25, 2009
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06/30/2012

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A Revolutionary Life
Enrico Malatesta
Guy
Alfred
Aldred
 
Hobnail Press 2005Publishing with Radical
IntentIn
a time
of
universal deceit, tellmg the
truth
is arevoiutionary act
.•..•
 
MALATESTA.
Enrico Malatesta, born in Capua, on December 4th, 1853.went
to
Naples
to study
pharmacology,
and
immediately cameunder the influence of Bakunin, in 1871. His interest for meconsists in
the
fact
that
he was a direct link between Bakunin
and
the
anti-parliamentary propaganda
that
I commenced inLondon in 1906. The story of
my
association with Malatesta wastold in
the
Herald
of
Revolt
for June, 1912, and need not be repeatedhere. I remember Malatesta listening
to
one of
my
meetings
at
the corner of Garnault Place, Clerkenwell, before I became
an
Anti-Parliamentarian.
As
I was going away with
my
platform,he stopped me and
said:
"You
are a strange person
to
be Englishbecause you are destined
to
become
an
Anarchist." AlthoughI was never personally very intimate with Malatesta, he made apoint after
that
of attending a large number of the meetings
that
I held in Clerkenwell. When he did speak he stuck
to
this theory
that
I was destined to continue the development of Anarchistthought in Britain.Because of this contact
at
the
very beginningof
my
anti-parliamentary activity, and because of his own association with Bakunin in his own youth
but
a
few
years beforeBakunin died, I regard him as a natural link between the activityof the great contemporary of Marx
and
the
movement
that
I haveendeavoured
to
develop in Great Britain,very largely in face ofthe opposition of the alleged friends of Malatesta and the allegeddisciples of Bakunin.At an early age Malatesta read Mignet's "History" of
the
French Revolution. He thrilled
at
the
popular struggle and likemost young Italians of
that
time became
an
ardent republican.
It
was Mazzini's denunciation of the Paris Commune
that
turned
him
into a Socialist. He decided
to
throw in his lot with thosewho defended the Commune
and
he joined
the
Naples section ofthe International Working Men's Association. This section was
not
in
the
most flourishing condition..
Its
most conspicuousmember was
the
ill-fated Carlo Cafiero,
at
that
time a wealthyman
of
boundless
~nthusiasm
and devotion.Cafiero was intimatewith Marx
and
Engels whereas Malatesta was identified with
the
principles of Bakunin. He undertook
to
disentangle Cafiero fromall Marx's intrigues and
to
persuade
him
and
Fanelli to meetBakunin
at
Locarno. Malatesta succeeded
and
both of theseItalian comrades stayed with Bakunin one
month
from May 20th
to
June 18th,
1872.
Bakunin's diary records their daily discussionand their mapping out of a definite.plan of revolutionary. organisation.Malatesta was now in the closest relations with Bakunin
and
arranged a conference of the Italian sections
at
Rimini, Au,gust,1872, which brought into'being what was known as the Italian

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