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Apollo 10 - Mission Post Launch

Apollo 10 - Mission Post Launch

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Published by Gheorghita Vednueb
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Aircraft, NASA, Apollo Mission, Columbia, Science, Space, Spaceflight, Planetary, Space Shutlle,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Aircraft, NASA, Apollo Mission, Columbia, Science, Space, Spaceflight, Planetary, Space Shutlle,

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Published by: Gheorghita Vednueb on Jun 07, 2013
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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
WASHINGTON,
D.C. 20546
IN REPLY REFER TO:
Post Launch
Mission Operation ReportNo. M-932-69-1026 May
1969
TO:
A/AdministratorFROM:MA/Apollo ProgramSUBJECT:Apollo IO MissionReport No. 1Director(AS-505) Post Launch Mission OperationThe Apollo 10 mission was successfully launched from the Kennedy SpaceCenter on Sunday,18 May 1969 and was completed as planned, withrecovery of the spacecraft and crew in the Pacific Ocean recovery areaon Monday, 26 May
1969.
Initial review of the flight indicates thatall mission objectives were attained.A-ttached is the Mission Director's Surnmary Report for Apollo 10 whichis hereby submitted as Post Launch Mission Operation Report No.
1.
Following further detailed analysis of data, crew briefing and othertechnical reviews, significant new information and OM?F evaluation ofApollo
10
primary tission objectives will be submitted in Post LaunchMission Operation Report No. 2.~ .qw.l-Sam C. PhillipsLt. General, USAFApollo Program Director
 
\
iI/
IN REPLY REFER TO:bL\o
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
WASHINGTON.
D.C. 20546
May
26,
iy6’1
TO :
DistributionF'lic))I:MA/Apollo Mission DirectorINTKODUCTION-------The Apollo 10 mission wus
$La.nried a; 3,
manned lunar mission de-velopment flight ta demonstrate cre.d/space vehicle/;nission
Sl-ziJ-
port facilitiesparformaqzc during a manned lunar mission withthe CommaQ'd,/Service Module (CSM) an3 Lunar A%,5kLe (LM), and
to
evaluate LM performancein i;he cislunar and Lunar environment;,Flight cred members ,,~erc:Comman~i~~r, o.10 T, P, Stafford;Coma& Modltie Pilot, Cdr. J, W. Young; Lunar %&tie Pilot, Cdr.E. A. Cernan,Initial rcvicd of the flight indicater; that allmission objectiveslqzre 3;ts;ainr31 (2;~ Table 1).The
At;~x:LIo
LO countdolm w% ac~com&iahed c&t& _n: unscheduledT;;;.idv; - - -- --- ----.- -- - - - -e--m-"----------- q.---Prior ta launch, the Command Mod-tie Reaction Control System AheliuJ1!1 manifold pressure decayed slightly. A suspect trans-duzer fittim was found .to be firq,e,r-tight and was subsequentlyretorqued.Difficulty was enaountered in wetting the sinteredmetal wicks in the Command Mod&-e suit loop water separator, aTomponent of the Environmenka.1 Control System.The procedurev a.5 ~uc~zessfully accomplished on the third attempt ix service0PLR3r Pl%xC)D_I-r43&-,"activity in thisvehicle launch in-_e&h-&??kee_riod included s~ce- -,-- -,-,--i-- ---me--sertion into---- -- ,A -t
$;;(_i'tr~&i~&
injection of the S-173L-.-- -- --e-eI---s..--Instrument U:lit [Iii~~GQ@~ G&~~~~;_$~&i~2 :~ockinp; g? Qection--.--No- -~-t~-~~~!L~-anl~-S--I~B propellant, tiding LGjV@gtix the S-IX3lynt\; -:.&.z?.- oMx+xiE- --.. --..---- .---*-- ----w-e-v-m _-w-eThe Apollo 10 space vehicle was successfully launched on timefrom Kennedy Space Center, Florida at 12:&g p.m, EDT on
18
Nay1969 0This was the fifth successive successful launch on-timeof a Saturn V.All ‘Launch vehicle stages performed satisfacto-rily, inserti-&%the S-IVB/IU,/CS.3l,~L.?? ombination into a nomin&Le.xth p:z?tin?orbit Jf
1c)2.6
by
9g06
nautical miles (N:vl) after 11
 
2minutes
,53
seconds of powered flight. Pre-TLI (tranalunar in-jectionIcheckout was conducted as planned and the S-IV13 burn .tiasinitiated at
2:33:27
(hr:min:sec) ground elapsed time (GEIC). TheTLI burn lasted 5 minutes,
43
seconds with all systems operatingsatisfactorily and aL1 end zonditions being nominal for the trans-lunar coast on a free return, circurulunar trajectory.At, about
3:03
(hr:min) GE!lY, he CSM was separated normally
from
the rest of the orbital vehicle consisting of the LM,
L3puzecra.f-t
LM Adapter (SL.A),
IU
and S-IVB Stage.SLA panel deployment wasnormal.CSM -;ransposition and docking acre completed by approx-imately
3:17
GSI'.FxcelLent quality color television (TV) cov-erage of the docking sequences was transmitted to the Goldstonetracking station and ;fas seen on -rJorldwide commercial television.Ejection of the CSM/LM from the S-IVB was sueceasfully accom-plished at abou-t 3:56 GEL7and a 2,5-seconJ Service Propulsion Sys-tem (SPS) avasive mneuver was performed 3,s planned at 4:39 GET.All LsuLleh vehicle safing activities were performed as schedul.ed.S-IV% liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen
Led temperature
meaaul*e-ment experiments IJere conducted satisfacto.rilyoSubsequent pro-pe.Llant dump was successful and provided sufficient impulse to theS-IVB/IU for a Nslingshotrr maneuver to earth escape velocity.Therefore,augmentation of thisimpulse by the S-IVB AuxiliaryPropulsion System ullage engine burn ~$3 tarminata~d by groundcommand immediately after ignition,S-IVl3/IU closest approxh tothe moon :Jas17j2 IF4 at
78:54
GEC (lg:b3 EDT, May 21).
SXGD P&ZIOD- - - --- -__ - - I
MaJor
activities ,$J-Y&% l;he_ second p$;%cz !,:I<;$ a m~cours? c_Fc--.-----y_--recJZond_ma-~--~ -_-t;;o lunar orbit insertion burns, and initial LM acti-_-- _-----a----m -.s ----m-e -- w-v-vation.,--LA -
Midcourse coxmz
tion maneuver nanber 1 (MC&L), originallyplannzed 35 a
47
foot-pe,--second (fps) SPS maneuver, was not con-ducted at 11:30 GET, since without this maneuver, the correctionrequirement at the next planned time,
26:313
GET, was for only
48.8 fps.The extended trackin, time established J. high proba-bility of not requiring any additional midcourse corrections#Auring translunar coast,Mid,oourseoorrection .maneuver nlmber i;-~o (MX-2) was performed at
26:32:56
~231 by a
6.7
-second firing of the SPS resulting in avelocity change of 48.9 .fps (48,7 fps planned),All parametersappeared nominal. an-i the resulting pericynthion was
6O,g
NM,Consequently,midcourse correction maneuvers n:umbers
3
md 4 wtrenot required.Five color TV transmissions tzt&l.ing 72 minuteswere made ,during translunar coast.Views of the receding earthand of the apacecraft interior were shown,
Pict7fle
quality wasexcelLen-?.

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