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Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 2 - page 278 à 373

Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 2 - page 278 à 373

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Published by Silky Beaver
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.

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[Box
I.
anything
Aighly
prized,
preceous,dauable,
or
excelbnt.
(Mgb,
Mob.)
-
Appliedto
a
man,
(AA,
Sbh,
Az,)
White
(AA,
Sh,
As,
1)
in
com-
plexion;
(Az;)
because
~.l
might
be
con-
sideredas
of
evilomen
[implyingthemeaning
of
leprosy]:
(AA,Sh:)
or,
accord.
to
Th,
because
the
latter
epithet,appliedto
a
man,
was
only
usedby
the
Arabeas
signifying
" pure,"
or
"free
fromfaults
:"
but
they
sometimesused
this latter
epithet
in
the
sense
of "white
in
complexion,"applied
to
a
man
&c.:
(IAth:)
fem.,
inthe
same
sense,
.-
:
thedim.
of
which,
V
,l'_,
occurs
in a
trad.,
applied
to
'Aisheh.
(s,0
TA.)
So,
accord.tosome,inthe
trad.,
/, l
j
a
.~lj,
(TA,)
i.
e.
I
haao
ben
snt
to
tAe
white
and
the
blachk;
because
these
two
epithets
com-priseall
mankind:
(Az,
TA:)
[therefore,bytheformer
we
shouldunderstandthe whiteand
the
red
races;
and
by
thelatter,thenegroes:
but
some
hold
that
by
the
former
aremeantthe
foreigners,
and]
by
the latter
are
meant
the
Arabh.
(TA.)
One
saysalso,[when
speaking
of
Arab.
and
more
northern
races,]
i-;3
Jb
.It
_1 .~.,
meaning
Every Arab
of
them,
andforeigner,
cameto
me:
and
one
should
not
say,
in
this
sense,
hl.
(AA,
Aq,
.)
5,_Jl,
also,
is applied
to
The
foreigners
(.
cal
e)
colectildy];
(f,A,
;)
because
a
reddish
white
is
the
pre-
vailinghue
of
their
complexion:
($:)
or
the
Perans
and
Grehs:
or
those
foreigners
motly
charactrised
by
whiteneu
of
compleion;
as
the
Gtks
and
Persiau.
(TA.)
You say,
U
!.
,.1
Th
re~
ui
not
amongthe
foreigners
(,aal)
the
like
of
him.
(A.)
And
accord.
to
some,
i!9l
j~.Jl
means
The
Arabsand
the
foreigners.
(TA.)
'lj
[so
in
the
TA,
but
correctly
i.;,J
:'Wl,]
is
anappellationapplied
to
Emancipated
lave:
and
eXtia
.l
iI,
meaning
Son
of
theA
female
slave,
isanappellalionused
inrevilingand
blaming.
(TA.)
-
Also
A
man
having
noweaponu
with
him:
pl.
j.
(A,)
and
j~
([.)
-
;
,.
.l
means
Beauty
is
in
;
_JI
lapp.
fairne
of
conm-
plexion;
i.
e.
beauty
isfair-complexioned]:
(TA:)
or
t
beauty
is
attendtedby
diiculty;
i.
e.
he
who
lotr,
beauty
must
bear
difficulty,
or distress:
(1Ath:)
or
thelover
experiencesfrombeauty
what
is
experiencedfrom
war.(1Sd,
.)_-
j*~b'1
A s,irt
of
dates:
(
:)
so called
becauise
of
their
colour.
(TA.)
-..
'll
j..a.'ml
Gold
and
ilver.
(TA.)
And
Xl
l
Flesh-meat
and
wine;
($,
A,
];)
saidto
destroy
men:
(s:)
so
in
the
saying,
;.O.,,'l
)
.AIj.
s
~-
We
areof
the
people
of
dates
and
water,
not
offlsh-meat
and
wine:
(A:)
or
the beveragecalled
J
and
flesh-meat.
(IApr.)
Also
Wine
and
[gar~ts
of
the
hind
caldle]
,.
(Sh.)
And
Gold
and
saffron;
(Az,
ISd,
K;)
saidto
de-
stroy
women;
i.e.
the
love
of
ornamentsandperfumesdestroys
them:
(Az:)
or
these
are
called
O
lju';
(AO,TA;)
andmilkand
water,
;~Lo%l;
(TA;)
and
dates
and
water,
O,l.
l
(A,
TA.)
And
I1;l'e.l
l'esh-meat
and
wine
and
[the
perfume
calted]
U,
1J:
(.,
X:)
or
gold
and
flesh-meat
and
wine;
as
also
j.'l:
TA
in
art.
j
:)
or
gold
and saffronand
Jdr.JI.
(18d,
TA.)_
s...
l
.s.lI
Slaughter;
(L,
1F;)
because
it
occasionstheflowing
of
blood:
(TA:)
and
[so in
the
L,
but
in
the
V
"or"]
triolent
death:(S,
A,
L,
V
:)
or
death
in
whichthe
sight
of
the
mtan
becomes
dimn
by
reasn
of
terror,
so
that
the
world
appearsred and
blach
before
his
cyes:
(A
'Obeyd:)
or
it
may
mean
t
recent,
fresh, death;
from
the
phrase
nextfollowing.
U(As.)_...4l_
A
new,
or
recent,
footstep,or
footprint:
opposedto
.'l.
(As,
8
A.)-&~
;
SA
serere
year;
(.8,1;)
because
it
is
a
meanbetween
the
.oj~
and
the
A'w:
or
a
year
of
severe
drought;
because,
in
sucha
year,the
tracts
of
thehorizonare
red:
(TA:)
when
"l.J!
[the tenth
Mansion
of
the
Moon(see
J!1
3j,:
in
art.
J)p)]
breaks
its
promise
[of
bringing
rain],theyear
is
suchas is
thuscalled.
(AH.n.)
-See
also
v'A
oce
;
._hl
..
*
;dw
and,
in
like
manner,
O;iS-
lit
ebrought
his
sheep,
or
goals,
in
alean,
or
anenaciated,
state.
(A,'
TA.)
S
..
s
., s
k$?.1:
see
.,o.I
.e.
[an
inf. n.
(of
'.~.)
usedas
a
subst.]
9e
A
bad
kind
of
tanning.
(Q.
[For
&
in
the
CI,
I
read
j,
as
inother
copies
of
the
.])
i.
q.
'.-_;
(V;
in
the
CC
.;...;)
i.
e.
The
iron
instrument,
or
stone,
with
which
one
shas
off
the
hair
and
dirt
on
the
srface
ofa
hide,
and
with
which
one
skins.
(L,
TA.
[But
for
thelast
words
of
the
explanationin thosetwo
lexicons,
.J,
I
read
e~.J
)
-
Also,
($,
TA,)
in
the
],
[and
in
a
copy
of
theA,]
,
which
is
a
mistake,
(TA,)A
horse
got
by
a
stallion
of
generous,
or
Arabian,
race,
out
of
a
marenot
of
mch
arace;
or
not
of
generous
birth;
or
a
jade;
syn.
e ;
($,A,
1
;)
in
Persian,
V
(,
;)
as
also
tG..:
(X
:)
or
ahorse
of
mean
race,
that
resemnbles
the
as
in
his.
slone
of
running:
and
a
bad
beast:
(TA:)
pl.
; ,
($,
A,
TA)
and
rf..:
(TA:)
andaccord.to
the
T,
*
3)..
signifies
[not
as
it
is
ex-plainedabove,asa
sing.,but]
i.
q.
"
.,;
and
Z
explains
it
as
an
epithetapplied
to
horses,sig-nifying
thatrun
liske
ase.
(TA.)
-Also
An
ignoble,
or a
mean,
man:
(l5,
e
TA:)
and
a
man
who
nwill
not
give
unless
pressed
and
importuned.
(1(,'
TA.)
j.t;..I
A
sect
of
the
ac.%
,
who
olpposed
the
Lb.*4
(,.K)
and
the
;:
(TA:)
a
singleperson
thereof
was
called
.-
:
(
i,
:)
tlhey
made
their
ensigns
red,
in
opposition
to
the
;3;-.
of
the
Benoo-JId.,him;
and
hencethey
were
thus
II
·
called,
like
asthe
ej
were
callcd
1..
because
their
ensigns
in war
were
white.
(T.)
j:
see
r
l_:
see
jl_
J.j
The
wild
as:
seej;l
:
(,
Mgh,
:)
or
a
certainkind
of
wild
aninmal:
(Mgb:)
[the
oryx;
to
whichthe
nameis
generally
applied;
and
so
in
Hebrew:
seealso
i.~jl
gj~,
in
art.
4
J:]
a
certain
best
(,
TA)
smbling
the
ih.
goat.
(TA.)
-
And
A
certainbird.
(i.)
_
See also
.,_l.
1.
aj-,
or.
,
inf. n.
j~,
It
(milk)
was,
or
became,
sour,
[so
as
to
burn,or
bite,
the ton
ue;
and
so,
app.,
,
inf.
n.
-1
;
(see,o
,
below;)
or]
in
a
less
degree
than
such
as
is
tCtnmed
j1_.
(TA.)
-
[Hence,app.,]
j3.,
inf.
n.
jt..,
trHe
(a
man)
was,
or
became,
strong,
robust,
sturdy,
or
hardy.
(KS,'*
TA.)
-
,pl!j
·J,
aor.
,
It
(beverage,
or
wine,)
stung,
or
bit,
the
tongue:
($,
I
:)
or
it
(milk,and
..
,,)
burned
the
tongueby
its
strength
andsharpneg.
(Mgh.)-
And
U..-,
or.
;,
(TA,)
inf.
n.
j.,
(J,)
He
took
it,
seized
or
grasped
it,
contracted
it,
or
drew
it
together;
syn.
4,
(,
TA,)
and
%:.
(TA.)
See3
...
You
say,
slp
.l
t,
e
saying contracted
hit
heart,
(Lb,
A,
TA,)
and
grieved
him,
(Lb,TA,)
or
pained
kim.
(TA.)
...
Also,
(A,TA,)
aor.
as
above,
(TA,)
and
sothe
inf.
n.,
(1,)
He
shampened
it;
(A,],
TA;)
namely,aniron
instrument,
(TA,)
an arrow-head
or
the
like.
(A.)
So
in thedial.
of
Hudheyl.
(TA.)
..
e
Aeritude
of
a
thing;
a q~ality,
or
pro-
perty,
like
that
of
burning,or biting,(S,
~,
TA,)
suchas
ths taste
of
mustard:
(TA:)
and
[inlike manner]
?3jl..
signifies
the
quality,
or
prolprty,
of
burning,
and
sharenes;
asin
beverage,
or
wine:
(TA:)
and
?
];:
o
our-
nes
in
milk,
with
a
biting
of
the
tonge;
(A;)
or
a
sourness
in
milk,
le~ thanthat
of
milk
which
is
termed
j)..
(TA.)
:
ee
what
next
precedes.
j$.a.,
appliedtothe
beverage
termed
d;,
[app.
when
it
isin
a
state
of
fermentation,]
Digestire.
(Fr,
TA.)
--
i
i1.
bJ
Xl
means
Verily
he
is
one
who
keep,
or
guards,
or
takes
care
of,pr~lently,
or
effectuay,
what
he
has
collected
togethr.
(s.)
[Tothe
explanation
inthcI
(".
I'.
tw)is
addedin
the
TA,
JJ., u
app.
a
mistranscription
for
o.
and
onewho
manage
it
well.]
jlj
2
l
.e.
J.,
and
l.j.l_,
IA
snarted
man:
(8,
TA:)
or
a
man
who
is
actite,
sharp
or
quich
in
intellect,
clewr,
ingenious,
or
acute
in
mindl,
(.K,
TA,)
and stroAng-erted.
(TA.)_
And
V
he
latter,
t
man
contracted
in
hart.
(TA.)
sw:
e
j_..
.~..
Sour,
(TA,)
and
burning,or biting,
to
thetongue,
or
acrid;
(A,
TA;)
appliedto
beve-
rage,or
wine:
(A:)
and
milk
that
bite
the
tongue:
(A:)
or
milk,and
J.;,
that
bur
the
tongue
by
its strength
and
sharpnes.
(Mgh.)
49
642
 
BooK
1.]
You
say
also
1
iiL,;
A
pomegranate
n
which'
is
sourness.
(A,
.)
.-.-
t
Intensa,
or
sere,
anxiety.
(TA.)
And
j,A.
jI.
((;,
TA)
t
A
wringing,
orpoignantandburning,
pain
in
tle
heart,
such
a
arises
from
wratk
Jc.
(TA.)
_
See also
e,
intwo
places.
J
t
J.~.;
S
Te
nmost
excellent
of
deeds
is
th
strongest,
or
most
pon~rful:
(.,,*X
TA:)
or
the
most
painful
(A,
Mgh, TA)
and
dis-
trssing:
(Mgb,
TA:)
from
'lh.,
applied
to
milk
and
to
4-,
signifying
"
that
burnsthetongue
by
reason
of
its
strength:"
(Mgh:)
a
trad.,
relatedby
I
'Ab;
(,
TA;)
said
by
Mo-
gel
l
0
---
bmnmad.
(TA.)
Yousay
also,
!Pja.1l
X
&14
,..
i
Such
a
one
is
inharder,
or
nore
dfitcult,
circumstances
(.l
A,I)
thaitn
such
a
one:
(TA:)
or
[nore]
contracted
in
circum-
stances.
(ISk,
TA.)
9JI
j~J;j
A
man
strong
in
the
tips,
or
ends,
of
the
fingers:
($,
](,
TA:)
occurring
in
averse
of
Aboo-Khiri(sh:
(s:)
but
[SM
says,]
what
I
read
in
a poem
of
tlhat
author
is
j.
tiseJ,
meaning,
hard
andpointedin
the
arrowr-
heads.
(TA.)
1.
_y,
nor.
,(,,
A,
1,)
i:f.
n.
_
(S)and
Qi.
(IIam
p.
2,)
lIe
was,
or
berame,
hard,
firm,
strong,
strict,
orrigorous,
inreligion,
and
in
fight,
(S,
A,
K.,)
and
i,n
courage,
(TA,)
and
in
an
affair.
(;lanm
p.
2.)
[See
also5.]
-
1
It
(an
affair,
or
a
case,
TA)
wax,
or
be(amnc,
severe,
r;goproi"t,
dlistreofel,
or
a.ffictive:
(Q,
TA:)
and
X
it
(war,
or tile
clamour
thereof,
,i1,)
wras,
or
became,
hot,
(A,TA,)
or
'vehement.
(TA.)_
~n,__,
nor.
:,
itnf.
n.
.Z~-,
Ise
(a
mala)
was,
or
became,
couraoeous.
(Sb,TA.)
5.
..
3
lIe
acted,or
behaved,witlhforrced
hard-
,esx,fir,
ncess,
strictness,
or
rigour,
(S,
A,
Mgla,)in
Iiis
religion.
(A, Mgh,
IC.)-IIe
(a
man)Jeigned
disobedience;
syn.
G.W.
$,
TA.)_
lIe
pro-
tected,
or
defended,
hinself,
(syn.Aj,)
to
by
means
of
him.
(Slh,
TA.)
6.
Ir.dl_
Theyvied
n,it,
stroveto
surpass,
or
contended
for
superiority
with,
Ote
another
in
strength,
(l).W,)
andfought
one
iunother.
(TA.)_-:
see
_.1,
in
three
places.
,..
IIardneu;firnneJ;
strength:
defence:conflict.
(TA.)
[See
also
,..]
;_m
Vehemesnt.
(TS,
1.)
So in
thesaying
of
Ru-beh,
[They experienced
fromit
vehement
strength]:
(TS,
TA
:)
or,
as
Azsays,
strength
and
courage.
(TA.)
-See
also
_a1,
in two
places.
L;t.
Courage:
(, l,
TA:)
defence:
con-
flict.[8ee
also
_.
L.~.
Hard,firm,
strong,
strict,
or
rigorous,
n
l
religion,
and
in
fight,
(S,,)
and
in
courage;(TA;)
asalso
t_.
:
(S,
]:)
pl.
of
the
former,
__.
(1t.)
-
Hence,A
pious
man,
who
carefullyab-
stainsfrom
unlawrful
things:
because
he
exceeds
I
theusualbounds
in matters
of
religion,
and
is
hard
to
himself;
as
also
t_
.
(TA.)-
-'
Sing.
of
.-
*1l,
Mgh,)
which
latteris
an
epithet
applied
to
The
tribes
of
.Kurmysh
(8,
A,)
and
Kindneh
(S,
K)
and
Jedeeleh,
(V,)
i.e.
Jedeelek
ofKejs,
consisting
of
[thetribes
of]
Fahnm
andand
'Adwdrn
the
twosons
of
Amr
the
son
of
Ceys
the
son
of
'Eyldn,
and
the
Bentoo-'Amir
Ibn-
,Raqfa'ah,
(AHeyth,TA,)
and their
followers
in
the
Time
qf
Ignorance;
(J
;)
or
to
Kureysh
andtheir
coreligionists;
(Mgh
;)
because
of
the
hard-
shipswhich
they
imposed
upon
themselves
in
matters
of
religion,
(S,
A,
Mgh,
s],)
as well
as
in
courage,
(TA,)
for
they
used
not
to
enjoythe
shade
inthedays
of
Minc,nor
to
enter
thehousesby
their
doors,
($,
Mglh,
TA,)
whilethey
were
in
thestate
ofl
1,
(TA,)
nor
toclarify
butter,
nor
to
pick
up
[dung
such
as
iscalled]
3U.,
(S,
L,)
or
.,
(TA,)
[for
fitel,]
and
they dwelt
in
the
Hjaram,
(AlIcyth,
TA,)
anddid
not go
forth
in
the
days
of
the-
C/
to
'Araf6t,
but
haltedat
EIl-Muzdclifch,el
(AHeytl,
Megh,
TA,)
saying,
"We
arethepcople
of
God,
and
we
go
notforth
fromthe
I.Iarlm
:"
(Alcyth,
TA
:)
or
theywere
thus
called
because
theymade
their
abodein
the
Hlaram:(Sgl,
TA:)
or
because
they
betook
thenmselves
for
refugeto the
t("'.LI),
which
is
the
Kiaabeh,
so
calledbecause
its
stones
are
white
inwlini,Ng
to
blicckness:
(
:)
the
Benoo-'Amir
were
of
the
,,_,
though
not
of
the
in-
habitants
of
the
Hjram,
because
theirmother
was
of
thetribe
of Kureysh:
the term
,l1tJ*l
also,[pl.
of
t
r.
r
f
.-,]
is
applied
to
those
c!f
the
Arabs
n.lho.we
wthers
were
of
the
tribe
of
Ku,reysh.
(TA.)
-
AlsoCourageous;
(Sb,l,
(;)
and
so
a
ld
t~
.
:
(I
:)
pl.
[of
the
first,
masce.
only,]
,_1_
and
[masc.
and
fem.]
~
and[of
thesecond
orthird]
°
~1.
(TA.)
_t_l~.~1
is
also
said
to be
applied
to
The
tribe
of
Kurey,sh:
or,
accord.
to
some,to
the
Behnoo-
'Amir,
because
descendants
of
Jureysh:
the
former
is said
by
IABr.
(TA.)
-Hence,
(A,
TA,)
.
&
A,
TA,
I,)
or;i
.1.I~1
,.a,
(L,)
i
HeJ
ell
into
distres
(A,
L)
r;ndi
trial:
(A:)
or
intocalamity:
(a:)
or
he
died:
(.K:)
or
the
latter
phrasehas
thislastmeaning.
(ISd,
A,and
TA
in
art.
~.u.)
vwas
the
name
of
a
courageous
people
of
theArabs.
(A,TA.)
__t;,
(.,A,,,)
and
i;:
L'-
(lI,)
X
A
severe
year.
(S,
A,
I5.)
They
sayalso
t.t
c
I
tSevere
years:
(Jp:)
the
mase.form
[of
theepithet]
being
usedbecauseby
i;,
is
meant
,l,1;
ortheepithetbeing
used
after
the
manner
of
a
subst.:(ISd,
TA:)
and
:;
L~
signifies
the
same:(]:)
orthe latter,
years
of
hunger.
(Az,
TA.)
-
It-
_
L
t
Vehement
[courage,
or
fight,
&c.].
(TA.)_
~...l
iLC.
:A
hardplace:
($,V:)
ora
rugged
643
and
hardplace:
(A:)
pl.
_
i.
(14)
You
say also
..
 
1
,f¶,
with
thepl.,meaning,
tA
sterile,
barr;e,
or
unfruitful,and
narrow,
land:
(A:)
or
a
landin
ohich
is
no
herbage
nor
pasturage
nor
rain
noranything.
(TA.)
And..
.
i
&I
Sterile,
barren,
or
unftuitful,
land.
(.,
L)
_:
see
we,~l,
secondsignification.
1.
-,
(A,
],)
aor.
:,
inf.
n.
j
and
A
',
0(,)
]Is
(a
man)
became
slender
in
the
,hanks.
(A,
X.)
_
3L
-.
,
aor.:;
(Msb;)
and
519i
',
or
.;L-;
accord.
to
different
copies
of
the
.;)
and
1
LJ.1
.;~,
inf.
n.
,;
(so
ina copy
of
the
A;)
or
' ^.,11,
aor.;;
(.;)
and
'...
(L,
,)
aor.
',
inf.
n.
,1e.
(A,
1)
and
a.;.,
(TA,)
The
mnall
bone
of
his
shank,
(Mqb,)
and
his
egs,
(8,)
and
the
shank
(A,
0)
of
a
woman,
(A,)
be-
came
slender.
($,
A,
Mvb,
].)
And
the
rlke
is
said,metaphorically,
of
the
wholebody.
(TA.)
Yousayalso,
JI1
*'
L~
.l
The
boo-string
be.-
came
slender:
anditsbeing
so
is
better.
(TA.)
10:
see
the
last
sentence
above.
.':
a
ee
thenextparagraph,throughout.
Chid.JA
b
Slender
in
the
shanks,
applied
toaman;
(a,n;)
s
also.3LJI
t
.,
(F,
Mgh,
Mb,
,)
and
li,...:
(TA:)
and
so
ch
i
t
ta.*_,
applied
to
a woman.
(A.)
And
WInJI
:
Slender
in
make,
applied
to
a
man.
(TA.)
I~.
lso
signifies
Slender,
appliedlto
the
smallbone
of
the
shank:
(Mb
:)
and
so
&'.~
[the
fem.],and
Vt
1
2,
and
1t
ca',
ap-
pliedto
the
shank
(3C),
and to
the
fore
arm
(t1;),
and
to
the
legs
(~1j):
and[the
pie.]
;._F
(TA)
and
1L_,
(1,)
applied
to
shanks
(J,e):
(I,
TA
:)
andt
J
!,
and
t
,,
and
* ,
appliedtoa
how-string;
(V.,*
TA;)
the
last
on
the
authority
of
Ibrsheem
El-Il,arbee;
(TA;)
and
each
of
thelastthreeepithets
withS
added,appliedtobow-strings.
(IC,TA.)
You
sayalso
t
a:L.~
j
A
gum
having
little
lesh:
(K:)
or
a
thin
gum.
(TA.)
,ra
4
and
M;.,
Mb,
1;)
the
formerpreferredby
Th,
(.,
TA,)
and
bythe
Koofees,
(Msb,
TA,)
andtheonly
word
of
that
form
ex-
cept
vI
and
jj
and
;
and
%s-.;
(Fr,
TA;)
the latter
alone
allowedby
Mbr,
(S,)
and
this alonementioned
by
8b,
(TA,)
and
preferred
by the
Bqrees,
(Mlb,TA,)
and
said
by
Mbrto
81
 
644
bethe
onlyword
of
this
form
except
jl,
mean-
ing"
short,"
and
J1.,
the
name
of
a
place
in
Syria,
($,
TA,)
but
Iir
did not
know
this
latterform
of
tdie
word;
(Az,
TA;)
[The
reicer
arie-
tinum;
or
chick-pe~a;]
a
ertain
grain,
S,
Myb,
,)
well
Aknown,
(M#b,
],)
of
the
descriptiontermed
&UUJI:
(AIn:)
n.
un.
as
and
£a,.:
(TA:)
it
iswhite,
andred,and
black,
and
of
a
sort
caUed
o.
.
[or
~:
?];
and
is
also
wild,
and
cultivated
in
gardens:
the
wild
smort
is
the
hotter,
and
themore
contracted;
the
nutriment
ofthe
garden-sortis
the
better;
and
the
black
is
themost
ponwerful
inits
operations:
(the
Minh(j,
TA:)
it
isfiatulent,
enitive,
diuretic,
having
the
property
of
increasing
theseminal
flutdand
the
carnal
appetite
and
the
blood:
(1]:)Hippocrates
says
that
ithas
in
it
twvo
sub-
stances,which
quit
it
by
cooking;
one
of
them
salt,
or
saline,
rwhiM
is
lenitive;and
the
other
sreet,
which
is
diuretic;
and
it
clears
away
spots
in
the
skin,
and
beautijiesthe
complexion,
and
is
benwficial
for
hot
tumours,
andits
oil
is
-
viceable
for
thde
ringworm,
or
tetter;
andits
meal,
for
the
finidof
foul
ulcers;
and
the
infuion
thereof,
or
tootiache,
andJbor
melingof
the
lip;
and
it
clars
he
voice:
(TA:)
it
also
strengthensthe
body
and
tie
penis;
'(!;)
wherefore
it
is
giwvn
as
odder
to
thestallions
of
horse
and
thelike,
and
of
camels;
(TA;)
on'
tha
condition
of
its
beingeaten
not
before
[other]
food
nor
after
it,
but
in
the
midst
thereof;
(i
;)
or,
correctly,
as in
the
MinhaJ,
it
should
be
eaten
betwroen
two
meals.
(TA.)
1.
.,
nor.
;
and
,,
($,
A,
Mob,
],)
aor.
,
($,)
or
:,
(I,)
or
both;
(TA;)
and
~
,
aor.:;
(1
;)
inf.
n.
[of
thefirst]
L6
,
(~,
Mb,
O)
and
[of
the
second
or third]
',
(as
in
somecopies
of
the
$
and
of
the
g,)
or
.;
(asin
other
copies
of
the
$
and
of
the
K
;)
said
of
a
thing,
($,
A,
Myb,)
or
the
third
is
said
particularly
of
milk,
(",)
It
was,
or
became,
,.1_
[i.
e.
acid,
tour,
sharp
orbiting
to
the
taste,pungent,
or
in
taste
like
rinegar
or
like
sour
milk:
see
.b_
below];
(S,
Mb,
g
;)
as
also
,
,;a.,
iuf.n
,n
z.
(TA.)
Yousay,
t;.
t.zL.
j
L.t
G
or
t
.,
(accord.to
different
copies
of
the
,)5
He
brought
us
some
thick
and
very
sour
milk,
not
to
be
endured
by
reason
of
sourn.
(.)
-
[Hence;
or
from
P.,
q.
v.infra,]
:l(,
A%,
,
A,
],)
aor
'
(A,
,
TA,)
inf
n.
,W.*.
(AV,
,
)
and
(I
;)
and
-
_l;
(A,
T$,
g
;)
he
cameus
paIstured
upon
_
[q.
v.];
(An,
S,
A;)
or
ate
it.
(s.)
-[And
hence,becausecamels
become
weary
of
eating
4&.,]
'fi
tI
disliked
him,
or
it.
(fgh,
.)
-
And
(because
camelsare
eager
for
~f
after
eatinglong
of
".,]
:...
'
t
zgerly
ds~
him,
or
it.
(?gh,
V.)
I.
:.,
inf
n.
,sm-.:
see
1,
finrt
signifi-
cation.
-
[It
seems
to
be
alsosyn.with
,
q.
v.:
for,
_]
said
of
aman,
it
signifies
,t,~
l?
s6!
*1;;1,as
though
heshifted
fromthe
better
of
the
twoplaces
to
the
worse
thereof,by
reason
of
preposterous
desire:
(TA:)
asalso
twa..l:
opposed
to
JUl
[q.v.],
(TA
in
art.,
JL.)--cp
&
also
signifies
.t,;.eL
(S,
TA)
in
.
(TAL.)
-
Also
t
The
giving,
or
doing,
little
of
a
thing.
(S,
.)
You
say,
W,
,.Sq.Id
Yj
t
Such
a
one
gave,
ordid,little
tou
inentertaining.
(S.
)
Jt
see
4
.
1
a;...h
see
L4
4.
h'j?l..a.
.l
Theland
became
abundant
inu~
[q.
v.].
(S.)_
ilj,,,.l
The
people,
or
company
of
men,
lighted
on,
or
found,
i.
(TA.)
-_
Jl
-
.&..l
i
q.
.,
q.
v.
(A,
T?,
1.)
_
[And
hence,]
*s!l
..-
l
!The
peopt,
or
conpany
of
nmen,
launched
into,
or
enteredupon,cheeringdiscourse.
(A,
TA.)
I
'Ab
usedto
say
to
hiscompanions,
I_l
I
[Launch
ye
forth,
or
enter
upon,
cteering
discourse];
(A,
TA;)
whereupontheywouldbegin
to recite
poetry,
and
to
relate
the
memorable
conflictsof
the
Arabs;
(A;)
because
they
thenenteredintotraditions
and
stories
of
the
Arabs,being
weary
of
theinterpretation
of
the
]Jur-an,
[like
camels
betaking
themselvesto
the
pasturetermed
.
whenweary
of
that
termed
..
](TA.)
[And
in
likemanner,]
o.,l..
also
means
tThe
changing
from
seriousnessto
jestingorjoking.
(HIar
p.
10.)_-See
also
2.
[And
see
]
".]
&L;;
(S,~,t)
or
't
,
inf.
n.
s.._
;
(ISk;)
I
pastured
thecamels
upon
.~...
18k,
.,
.)r[And
hence,
as
camelsare
pastured
upon
~
afterthey
have
pastured
for
a
time
upon..,]
~
.;a~l,
and
ta..,
SlIeshifted
him
from
it
[to
anotherthing].
(TA.)
5.
',,
.3
[app.
signifies,
in
its
primary
accep-tation,
He
(a
camel)
betook
himulf
to the
pasture
terme
d
after
eating
for
a
time
of
that
termed
3...
(See
also
1
and
4
and
2.)
-Andhence,]
!
He
shtfted
from
one
thing
to
another
thAing.
(TA.)
-
[Hence
also,]
onesaysto
a
manwhenhe
comes
threatening,
J;-
C..
_
1
[Thou
art
disordered
in
temper,
there-
fore
sooth
thyself]:
(S,
A:)
from
i'
and
.,,i.'
(p.)
[Seealso
A.,
in
art.
J&.]
,4.
[a
coil.
gen.
n.]
A
kind
of
plant
in
which
is
saltnes,
(A,
Msb,)
which
camels
eat
as
thowgh
it
were
fruit,
and
after
which
they
drink:
(A:)
otherplants
aretermed
aA.:
(Mb
:)
or
whatis
salt
andbitter,
of
plants;
(s,
.;)
such
as
the
..j
and
the
JU1
and
the
.oO
and
the
like:
(S
:)
whatis
sweet
iscalled
3.:
(S,
I:)
or
any kind
of
plantthat
issalt,
or
sour,
rising
upon
[teeral]
~s,
and
having
no
[sinfle]
J.
~l
[or
stock]:
(M
[as
cited
in
the
L,
but
I
doubt
whetherthe
passage
becorrectly
transcribed]
:)
or
any
salt,
or
our,
kind
of
trees;
havig
a
juicy
and
quivering
leaf,
which,
whem
~quezed,
bursts
forth
with
water;
and
having
a
pungent,
or
strong,
odour;
that
cleanses
the
gar-
ment
and
the
handnhen
tAey
are
washed
with
it;
[Boox
I.
uch
as
the
·
and
the
1;,.u
and
te
4
and
the
c
a-nd
the
L3
and
the
Ae.,
and
the
a
and
a
nd
the
J
and
th
;
and
the
like:
(L
B
 
:)
or
any
plant
tAat
does
not
dry
up
in
the
;
[or
spring],
but
endura
tathot
season,
having
in
it
saItncs;
ohen
cmes
eat
it,
t