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Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 3 - page 112 to 222

Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 3 - page 112 to 222

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Published by Silky Beaver
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.

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Published by: Silky Beaver on Jun 07, 2013
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[BooK
I.]
The
ninth
letter
of
the
alphabet;
called
Jl:
it
is
one
of
theletters
termed
;'
[or
vocal,
i.
e.
pronounced
with
the
voice,
and notwith thebreath
only]:
and
of
the
letterstermed
4,~.
[or
gingival],
which
are
b
and
3
and
U,;
wherefore
it
is
substituted
for
t
in
·. ifor.,;;
and
it
is
said tobe
substitutedfor
the
unpointed
>
in
,
3.yL,
[as some
read]
in the
]ur
[viii.
59,
forA,m
±.].
(TA.)
_
[As
a
numeral,
it
denotes
Seven
hundred.]
13
1j
is
said
by
Aboo-'Aloee
tobe
originally
&.3;
the
ks,though
quiescent,
beingchanged into
I:
(M:)
or
it
is
originally
,3
or
ks33;
the
finalradical
letter being
elided:
somesay
that
the
original
medial radical
letter
is
U
because
it
has
been
heard
to
be
pronouncedwith
im&leh
[and
so
it
is
now pronouncedin
Egypt];
but
others
say
that
it
is
j,
andthis
is
the
more
agreeablewith
analogy.
(Msb.)
It
is
a noun
of
indication,[properlymeaning
Tits,
but
sometimes,
when
repeated,
better
rendered
that,]
relating
to an
object
of
the masc.
gender,
($,
M,
],,)
suchI
as
is
near:
(I'AI
p.
36:)
or
it
relates
to
what
is
distant
[accord. to
some,
and
thereforeshould
always
be
rendered
that];
and
I.J,
[which
see
in
what
follows,]
to
what
is'
near:
(]gin
art.
tI:
[but
the formeris
generally held
to
i'elate
to
what
is
near, like
the
latter:])
orit
is
a
noun
denoting
unything
indicated
that
isseen
by the
speaker
and the
person
addressed:thenoun
in
it
is
3,
or
3
alone: and
it
is a
noun
of
which
the
signification
is
vague and unknown
until
it
is explained
by
what
follows
it,
as when
you
say
j4.i
11
[This
man],
and
,hJ1
13
[his
horse]:
and
the
nom.and
accus.
and
gen.
are all
alike:
(T:)
the
fern.
is
jS
(T,
S,
M,
1V,
but
omitted
in
the
ClO)
and
.5,
($,
M,
K,
but
omitted
in
theCId,) the
latter
used in
the
case
ofa
pause,
(S,)
with
a
quiescent
%,
which is a
substitute
for
the
kS,
not
a
sign
of
the
fernm.
gender,
(S,
M,)
as
it
isin
,.
and
_,
in
which
it
is
changedinto
&
when
followed
by
a
conjunctive
alif,
for
in
this
case
the
a
in
.3
remains
unchanged
[but
is
meksoorah,as
it
is
alsoin
other
cases
of
connexionwith
a
following
word];
and
one
says
also
.0A(M
;)
and
U
and
3:
(S
and
1~
&c.
in
art.
U:)
for
thedual
you
say
X6lj
and
0jU5
(M;)
CiT
is
the dual
form
of
13
(T,
)
[and
OU
is
that
of
e
used
in
the
place
of
LkS];
i.e.,
youindicate
the masc.
dual
by
X
I
in
the
nom.
case,
nnd
'i3
in
the
accus.and
gen.;
and the
fem.
dualyou indicateby
OiU
in the nom.
case,
and; in
the
accus.
and gen.:
(I'AB
p.
36:)
the
pl.
is
*.
.
[or
--
1]
(T,
S,
and
I'A~
ib.)
in
the
dial.
of
the people
of
El-I.ijziz,
(I'Ak,)
and
jJl
[or
J1]
(T,
I'Ak)
in the dial.
of
Temeem;
each
both
masc.
and
fem.
(I'A4
ib.[See
art.
Jl.])
You say,
.j,
16
[Tlhi
is
thy
brotaer]:
and
',a.1
j3
[This
is
thy
sister]:
(T:)
and
i.51t
i
Y
[I
mvii,
not
come
to
thee
in
this
year];
likeas
you
say
LIJM
.k
e
and
z.
l
k.LS
;
not
L
13
because
13
is
always
msec.
(As,
T.)
And
you say,
.1.I.,1
X
I
[Tltese
two
are
hy
twro
brothers]:
and
)L.LI
X1U
[These
two
are
thy
two
sisters].
(T.) And
Jlai.I
1
;9Jl
[These
are
thy
brothers]:
and
.'jl1
~ljl.l
[These
are
thysisters]:
thus making
nodifference
betweenthe mase.
and
the
fem.
inthe
pl.
(T.)
-
The
bi
that
isused
to
givenotice,
to
aperson addressed,
of
somethingabout
tobe said
to
him,
is
prefixed
to
11
[and
to
kS5
&c.],
(T,
S,
M,
B,)
and
is
a particle
withoutany meaning
but
inception:
(T:)
thus
you
say
1"., (T,
S,
M,)
and
some
say
II.,
addinganother
I;(Ks,
T;)
fem.
kS
J,
(T,
?,
M,)
and[more
commonly]
,j;
in
the
case
of a
pause,
(M,)
and
,ji
in
other
cases,
(T,
$,)
and
Ub,
and
some
say
..,L,
but
this
is
unusual anddisapproved:
(T:)
dual
Jk&
forthe
mase.,
and
i
IS
for
the
fem.;
(T
;)
saidby
IJ
to
be
not
properlyduals,
but
nouns formedtodenote
duals;
(M;)
and many
of
the Arabs
say
i
I1
;
(T;)
some, also,
make
l
indecl., like
the sing.
$I,
reading
[inthe
lur
xx.
661]
X
'
1/l
j?t.LJ
[Verily
these
twvo
are
enchanters],
and
it
has
been
said
that
this
is
of
the
dial.
of
Belharith[or
Benu-l--Irith]
Ibn-Ka4b;
but
othersmake
itdecl.,
reading
,ts..tJ
X
: (C
TA:
[see,
however,what
has beensaid
respectingthis
phrase
voce
I
J:])
the
pl.is
t'.
in
the
dial.
of
Temeem,with
a
quiescent 1;
and
'l.si
in
the
dial.
of
the
people
of
El-klijaz,with
meddand
hemsz
and
khafd;
and
'~j
in
the
dial.
of
Benoo-
'Oleyl,
withmedd and
hemsz
and
tenween.
(AZ,
T.)
The
Arabs
alsosay,
1j
4i
lb
9,
intro.ducing
thename
of
God
between
Lt
and
1I;
meaning
No,
by
God;
this
is
[my oath,
or]
that
by
which
I
swear.
(T.)In
the
followingverse,
of
Jemeel,
a
LfJ
aC
-
-fl-
1
1~I~J
[it
is
said
that]
iLa
is
for
1'si,
(M,)
i.
e.,
a
is
heresubstituted
for
the
interrogative
hemzch
(S*
and
]
in
art.
Ua)
[so
that
themeaning
is,
And
hIer
female
companions
ca,ne,
andsaid,
Is
thiL
he
mtho
gave
love
to
other
than
us,
andtreated
us un-
kindly?]:
or,
as
some
assert,
Ija
is
here used
for
Ika,
the
I
beingsuppressedfor the
sake
of
themeasure.
(El-Becdr
El-.larifce,
TA
in
art.
Lt.)
-One
says also
.lW,
(T,
f,
M,
]g,)
affixing
to
1I
the
J
of
allocution,
[q.
v.,
meaning
That,]
relating
to
an object
that
is
distant,
(T,*
S,
and
I'A15
p.
30,)or,
accord.
to
generalopinion,
to
that
wlliclhoccupies
amiddle
place
between
the nearand
the
distant,
(I'A15pp.
36
and 37,) and
this
.
has
no
place in desinential
syntax; (S,
anld
I'A]~
p.
30;)
it
does
not
occupy
the
place
of
a
gen.
nor
of
an
accus.,
but
is
only
affixed to
15
to
denote
the
distance
of
13j
rom theperson
addressed:
(T
:)for the
fernm.
you
say
,JP
(T,
S) and
,U;
($
and
.K
n
art.
U,
q.
v.
;)
but
not
.1i,
for
this
is
wrong,
(T,
S,) and
is
used
only
by
the
vulgar:
(T:)
for
the
dualyou
say
;jll
(T,.)
and
as,,
s
in
the
pllrases
j~..JI
i
jI; .;
[Tlhosetwo
men
came to
me]
and
,;J
AL.
*;!
[I
sa,v
thosetwo
men];
(S;)
and
somesay
.ilJ,
with
teshdeed,
(T,S,)
[accord.
to
J]
for
the
purpose
of
corrobo-
ration,and
to
add
to
the
letters
of
the noun,
(.,)but
[accord.
to
others]this
is
dual
of
.Ji,
[which
see
in what
follows,]
the
second
X,
being
a
substitute
for
the
J;
(T
on
the authority
of
Zj
and
others;)
and
some
say
,CU
also,with tesh-deed,
(T,
S,)
as well
as
,Uj.:
(T
in
this
art,
and
g
and
I
in
art.
U1,but
thereomittedin
some
copies
of
the
S:)
the
pl. is
[J1J.I
and]
4WJ.I.
ST,
)
i
is also
prefixed
to
£l;
so
that
you say,
.Oj
I
[That
is
Zeyd]:
($,
TA:)
and
in
likemanner,
for
the
fem.,
you
say
4;.t
and
IIl3
:(
and
1~
in
art.U:)
but
it
is
not
prefixed
[tothedualnor]
to
-.
$.)_You
also
add
J
in
.ailj,
(T,
$,
M,
1,)
as
a
corroborative;
(TA
;)
so
that
you
say
;Ui,
[meaning
That,]
(T,
g,
M,
1,)
relating
to
an
object
that
is
distant,
by
com-
mon
consent;
(I
'A
pp.
36
uand
37;)
or
hemzeh,
saying
JlSlb,
(],)
but
some
say
that
this
is
a
 
lI -
[.l
mispronunciation:
(TA
in
art.
ktS
:)
for the
fem.
yousay
i3
and
ljl:
the
dual
of
Ui
is
L3,
mentioned
above;
and
that
of
the
fem. is
tUJ:
(T:
[and
in
the
K
in
art.
U,
jUU is
also men-tioned
as
a dual,
as well as
a
sing.:])
and the
pl.is
~LUJjl.
(S
and
M
and
]~ voce
Jjl or
.J3l
or
I1.
[See
art.
JIl.]) &
s
not
prefixed
to JJ
(.)
nor
to
~W
[norto
l3U)l]
because,
as
IB
says,
the
J
denotes the remoteness
of
that
whichis
indicated
and
thetadenotes itsnearness,
so
that
the
two
areincompatible.
(TA
in
art.
U.)
-In
the saying
in
the
l]ur
[ii.
296, the
Verse
of
the
Throne],
!
,S'.:5:iil
(T,
TA,)
accord.
to
Th
andMbr,
(TA,)
1J
is
syn.
with
1.j
[so
that
the
meaning
is,
WVlho
isthisthat
shallintercede
with
1Iim
but
by
his
per-
,i.ssion?]:
(T,
TA :) or
it
may
be
here
redundant
[so
that the meaning
is,
Vlho
is
he
that
&c.
?].
(Kull.)
-.
It
is
sometimes
s!yn. wvith
LSJI.
(T,.,
M.)
So
in
the
saying,
l
IC.
[Whll'at
is
it
that
thou
sarertt?];
to
which
one
mayanswer,
c)L.-
[A
goodly
commodity].
(Sb,S.)
And
so
in
the
l
ur
[ii.
21G],
s
3
l.
4'·L.d"
[And
they
ash
thee
whtat
amount
of
their property
is
it
that
they
shall
expendin
alms];(T,
M,
TA;)
necord(.
to
those who
make the reply
to
be
in the
nom.
case;
forthis
shlows
that
La
is
[virtually]
in
the
niom.
case as
aninchoative,and
1
is
its
enunciative,
arid
;
is
the
compliement
of
I1;
anid
that
Le
and
13
are
not
to
be
regarded
as one
word:
[or]
this
is
ilthe
preferableway
ofexplanatiqn
in
lthe
opinion
of
Sb, though
he allowed
tihe
otherway,
[that
of
regarding
to
and
13
as
oneword,togehlier
constitutiig
aninchoative,
and
Oiej
as
its
enunicialive,
(see
I[am
p.
521,)]
withi
[thereply
in]
the nom. ense:
(M
:)
and
lt,
also,
is
tinsed
in
the
same
sense:
(TA:)
sotoo
13
in
1
L
anld
1,
3
O>
maybe
considered
as
syn.
writh
I.5jUl;
but
it
ispreferable to
regard
it
as
iedundant.
(Kill.)-It
is
[said
to be]
redundant
also
in
othier
instances:
for
ex.,in
the
trad.
of
Jereer,
as
related
by Aboo-'Amnr
Ez-Zahid,
who
says
that
it
is
so
in
this
instance:
°
'
[Tchere
will
come
to
you
a
man
from
sl-Yemen,
havitg
upon his
face
an indication
of
dominion].
(TA.
[But
this
evidentlybelongsto
art.
'.;in
which
see
a
similar
ex.
(1
LeM).
See
also
other
exs.
there.])
-
[,L5
lit.
means
Like this:
and
hence,
thus:
as
also
I,.
-
It
is
also
often
used
as one
word,
and, as
such,
is
made
the
com-
plement of
a
prefixed
noun;
as
in
I,l
·S
and
It
L
In
such
a year.
See also
art.
I,i.
:
and
sec
the
letter
j.]
-_ I
is
sometimes
used
to
exprem contempt,
and mean
estimation;
as
inthe
saying
of
'Aisheich
respecting
'Abd-Allah
Ibn-
'Amr
Ibn-'Abbda,I."
.
cy')
L
[0
ronder
(menning
how
I
n?onder)
at
Ibn-'Amr,
this
fellow!7.
(Kitib
el-Miftab,
cited in
De
Sacy's
"
Gram.
Ar.,"
2nd
ed.,
i.
442.)
[I.
Q
often
ocuurs as
addremedtoonewho
is
heldinmean
estimation:
it
is
like
the
Greek
'
oJro~,
and
virtuallylike
thevulgar Arabic
expression
..l
%.,
andthe
Latin
heus
tu;
agreeablywith which
it
may
berendered
O
thou;
meaning
0
thoufellovw;
an
appellation
denoting
mean
estimation being
understood:
in
the contrary
case,one
says
.i
l,.
Seealso,
in
what
follows,
a usage
of
Jlj
and
lJJI.
_Il
in
a
letter
and the like
is
introduced
whenthe
writerbreaks
off,
turning
to
a
new
subject;
and means
"This
is
all
that
I
had
to
say
on
the
subject
to which.
it relates:"
what
follow3
it
is
commenced
with
the conjunction
j.]
_One
says,
jlJ,
uj
[and ;.iJJ
.iJ],
meaning
It
is
,iot
approved'
for,
[like
as
a
person
leld
in mean
estimation
is
indicated
by I,&,
whichdenotes
a
thing
that
is
near,
so,] on
account
of
itshighldegree
of
estimation,
athing
that
is
approved
is
indicated
by
that
whereby
one
indicates
a
thing
that
is
remote.
(Kull
voce
,.)
[See
also
what
next
follows.]-
4;l
£1J!
inthe
11ur
ii.
1
issaid
by
Zj
to
mean
,Ul
[Tlis
book]:
but
others
say
that
,1J.
is
here
used
because the book
is
remote [from others]
in
respect
of
highness
andgreatness
of
rank.
(TA.)
,iJ.
[lit.
Likethat,
often
means
so,
or
in
like
manner:
and-]
Let that
stu.ice
[thee
or]
you.
(TA
in
art.
bl,
from
a
trad.)
-
The
dim.
of
is
is
I3J:
(T,
S,
Ml:)
you
form
no dim.
of
the
fem.
k;,
using
in
its
stead
that of
t, (8,)
which
is
W
:
(T:)
the
dim.
of
the dual
[j1l~]
is
ejl
3:
(
:)
and
that
of
[the
pl.]
e.31
[and
J,'l]
is
.ljI
[and
Wjl]:
(T:)_
that
of
I.a
is
,
like
that
of
13;
[and
you
maysay
t.u:
also;
for]
that
of
,")
is
,"i
: (T
:)
that
of
bl
is
.i):
(S,
g
:')
and
thiat
of
LU1
s
'L-:
(K
in
art.
U:)
.thatof
,j~
is
.iLU :(S, K :*)
ndthat
of
i,
is
;.J e
S.)
A
r'jiz
says,
[Or
thou
shalt swear
by
thy
Lord,
the
High,
that
I
am
the
father of
that
little
child]
:
(8,
TA:)
he
wasan
Arab
whio
camine
from a
journey,
and
found
that his
wife
had
given
birthi
to
a
boywhiom
he disacknowledged.
(TA.)~
1I
is
alsothe
accus.case
of
3,
q.
v.
1.
5
He
(a
man,
MA)
was
frightened
by
the
wolf;
(M, 1
;)
asalso
a.o,
or.
:;
and
,S,
aor.
':
(]:)
or
he
(a
man)
was
assailed,.fallen
upon,
come
upon,
or
orertaken,
by
the
wnolf
(Ibn-Buzurj,
T.)
And
[hlience,
in
theopinion
of
ISd,
as
he
says
in
the
M,]
t
He
was
fr.ihtened
by
anything;
(M,
;)
and
so
tV
,l,
(AA,
T,
S,
M,
K,)
inf.
n.
.'~3I;
(TA;)
said
of
a
man.
(S.)
[Hence
also,]
41.,
(M,
],)
aor.
:,
(K,)
[inf. n.
,l3J,]
S
lie
rightened
him
[like
as
does
a
nolf]:
(M,
A,
K,
TA:)
and
C>m!Jl.;dl,
(A,
TA)
and
t
stl,/3
as
also
4rj,
(T,
TA,)
t
The
jinn,
or
genii,
f.
ightened
himn.
(T,
A,
TA.)
[And
hence,
app.,]
_Jl
£.ll
The
wind
came
to
him
from
every
side,
like the
nolf;
when
guarded
a.qainstfrom
one
direction,
coming
from
another
direction:
(A:)
and
(?
..l'-,
(T,S,
M,K,)
and
t
;,
(S,
M,
g,)
S
The
wind varied,
01',
S,
M,)
or
camenow
from
one
direction
and
now
fi.om
another
direction,
($,
M,
K,)
so
says
As,
(S,)feebly:
(MI,
:)
accord. to
As,
from
ljJI,
(S,)
[i.
e.]
it
is
likened
tothe
wolf,
(M,)
becausehis motions
are
of
the like
description:
(S:)
or,
accord.to some,
U. Jl
is
derived
from
Vt
.i.3
.JI1
meaning
the
winidblemwfrom
every
direction;
because
the wolf
comes from
every
direction.
(MF,
TA.)
-
Also,
(i.e.
s..)
IIe
(a man)
hadhis
sheep,
or
goats,
fallen
upon
by
the
wolf.
(8,
5.)
-
And
-j.,
(T,
8,
M,
A,
1k,)
aor.
',
(T,
,,)
inf.
n.
awl;
(
M,
g
;)
and
rl ;
(M,
A,
]';)
and
t
,i,j
;
(M,
;)
Ise
(a
man,
T,
S,
M)
was,
or
became,
bad,
wicked,
deceitfid,
or
crafty,
(T,
8,
M,
A,
K(,)
like the
wolf,
(.,
M,A,
K,)
or
as
though
he became
a
wolf.
(T.)
And
i..,
aor.
',
Hsle
actedl
like
the
wrolf;
when
guardedagainst
rom
one
direction,
coming
from
anotherdirection.
(TA.)
[And
probably
t
lIce
hon,led
like the
wolf;
for,]accord.
to
Kr,
(M,)
',r;l
signifies the
uttering
a
loud,
or
vehement,
cry
or
sound.
(M,
1.)
-
And
t
lIe
hastened,
or
nas
quick,
in
pace,
or
journeying;
(J;)
asalso
'
r.&Il.
(TA.)
'l3,
[nor.
:,]
inf.
n.
,,
also
signifies
iHe
despised
him;
and
so
4.1S:
(T:)
or
he drove
himn
anay,
and
despised
him:
(ISk,
T,
.,
M,
g
:)
or
le
drove
himn
amay,
(Lbh,
M,
TA,)
and
beat
him;
(Lb,
TA;)
and
so
a1:
(M,
TA:)
[or
he blamed,
or
dispraised,
him;
like
&*I3;
for,]
accord.to
Kr,
(M,)
..
oi,
signifiesthe
act
of
blaming,
or
dispraising.
(M,
..) -
And
lIe
drove
him,
or
urged
himn
on:
(4 :)
or
i)1.1,
inf.
n.
,i,
he
drove,
or
urged
on, the
camel.
(S,
M.)
HIe
collected
it;
(T,
;)
namely,
a thing.
(T.)
-
-le
made
it
even;
.syn.
l4...
(CK:
omitted
in
other
copies
of
the
]
and
in
the
TA.)
One says
of
the
woman
who
makes
even
()
her
vehicle,[meaningthe
part
of
her
camel-vehicleupon whichshe
sits,]
C'~'
'
$11
La
[.How
well
has
sie
made
it
even!]
(T.)
-
lie
made
it;
namely,
a
[camel'ssaddle suchas
iscalled]
.J (IS)
and
[suchas
is called]
a
a-
3
.
(TA.)
=
lie
made,
[or
disposed,]
f,r
him,
(namely,
a boy,)
a
i33
[q.
v.];
as
also
t
'431
and
V
.
(.)
said
of
a
horse,
He
was,
or
became,
affected
with
thedisease
termed bJ..
(T,
Mgh.)
2:
see
1,
last
sentence
but
one.
-
j.:Jl
"1
,
(inf.
n.
Hi,
(,)
He
mnade,
to
the
.J~.j
or
camel's saddle],
what
is
termed
a
4i,
(M,
K,)
or
,.,.
(TA.)
[See
also
.lj...]
4.
,bj
,l.l
(A,TA)
The
land
abounded
nith
wolves.
(TA.)
-
See also
1,
in
three
places.
5:
see 6,
in two
places:
.-
and
see
also
1, in
three
places.
1
948
[BooK
I.

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