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Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 3 - page 223 to 333

Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 3 - page 223 to 333

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Published by Silky Beaver
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.

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Published by: Silky Beaver on Jun 07, 2013
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1067
signification
than
the
latter;
theformerincluding
in
its
objects
thebelieverand
the
unbeliever,
and
*
the
latterhaving
for
itspeculiarobjectthe
believer:
(Bd!
on
the
i:)
accord.
to
J,
(TA,)
they are
two
names
[or
epithets]
derivedfrom
i;:&,,
and
are
like
X
and
.,
and
are
syn.;
therepetitionbeing
allowable
when
the
[modeof]derivation
is different,
for
the
purpose
of
corroboration:
(S,
TA:)
or therepetition
isbecause
the
formeris
IHebrew,
[originally
'.Z.l.,]
and
t
thelatter
is
Arabic:
(I'Ab,
TA:)
but
theformer
is
applicableto
God
only;
thoughMusey-limehthe
Liar
wascalled
.QLl
,le-~;
(8,
TA;)
andit
is
said
to
mean
the
Possessor
of
the
utmost
degres
of
,.I;
and
accord.
toZj,
is
a
name
of
God
mentionedin
the
mostancient
books:
(TA:)
whereas
the
latter
is
syn.
,vith
*m.ItJ!:
(R,,
TA:)
or [rather]
t.j1;
is
the
act.
part.
n.
[signifying
ihaving
mercy,
&c.],
and
.sm.
hasan intensive
signification[i.
e.
having
much
mercy,
&c.]:
(M.b:)
thelatter
is
appliedalsotoa
man;
and
so
is
*'g-,
in
the
same
sense,
and
likewise
to
a woman:(TA
:)
the
)pl.
of
.
is
--
;
(Mbyb,TA;)
occurring
in
thetrad.,
*L.
.
C.
21
tell,
or
L.aJI,
as
related
by
differenit
pcesons;[i.
e.
God
has
mercy
onthe
merciful
only
of
his
servants,
or
vcrily
those
on
whomn
Godl
has
mnercy,
of
his
servants,
are
tle
mnercifil;]
La..JI
beingin the
accus.caseas
the
objective
complement
of.a..,
and
in
the
noni.
case
as
the
enuiciative
of
to
inthe
sense
of
Lil.
(Ms..)
'J,_
is
from
4
a
J,
[with
wlhicl
it
is
syn.,]
(S,TA,)
butit
is
used
only
coupledwith
itslike
in
form:
(K,
TA:)
onesays,
C;
.JJ...
Jh
,,,.
[Fear
is
better'
for
thee
than
pity,
or
comlmssion],
meaning
thy
beingfeared
is
better
than
thy
being
piticdtli
or
compasmionated:
(S,
J&:
but
inthc
Ibrminer,
without
.J:)
or,
accord.
to
Mbr,
* ..,
)
j..
(Meyd.
[Scc
art.
"..&])
.i.
~.j:
see
whatnext
preccdes.
:
sec
1,
nlast
sentence
but
two.
;J_-
(Lh,
$,
IK)
nd
t' l.j,
(.K,)
applied
to
ashechamel,
(Lh,,
TA,)
and
to
a
ewe
orshe.
goat,
andto
a
woman,
(TA,)
[andapp.toany
animal
having
a
womb,
(see
;,)]
Having
a
complaint
of
her
womb
(Lb,
S,
M,
})
af?e,.
bringing
orth,
(Lb,
.,
,)
and
dying
in
conse-
qwuence
thereof;
(1K;)
and
*'a~-,
applied
to
a
she-~nel,
signifies
the
same:
thepl.
of.
.
is
_,j,
withtwodammehs.
(TA.)
-
For
thefirst,
seealso
J,
nearthe
end
of
the
pagragaph.
.ej:
see
>C~.,J1,
in
sevenplaces.-Some-
times
it
is
nyn.
with
'.V
&
[i.e.
Treated,
or
regarded,
with
mercy
or
pity
or
compassion;
&c.:
see
1,
first
sentence]:
'Amelles
Ibn-'A1eel
says,
(using
it
inthis
sense,
Iam
p.628,)
*
a
,9_JI
i.
.
;
,
M
M
$
(8,
and
Ham,)
i.
e.
[But
at
all
events,]
Aen
nwar
becomes[once]severe
to
thee,
and
thine
enemy
hasalmost
overcome
thee,
[verily
thou
art
re-garded
with
favour,]
treated
wvith
nmercy,
and
defended,
by
us.
(Ham.)
.,_.;:
see
.>g.j1l,
in
twoplaces,inthe
latter
halfof
the
paragraph.
-
Also,applied
to
a
ewe,
and
to
a
she-goat,
lHaving
the
wombswollen.
(LI,
JI.)
.JI
[MIore,
and
most,
merciful,
&c.].
God
is
~
.lSj1,,~4l
TheMost
Merciful
of
those
that
have
mercy].
(TA.)
·
6.·
19_,4:
see
a_;.
...
x
[Treated,or regarded,
nith
much
mercy
orpity
or
compassion;
&c.]:
it
is
with
teshdeed
to
denote
intensiveness
of
thesignification.
(S,
TA.)
-
[See
also
2,
of
which
it
is
the
pass.
part.n.]
;s-°:~
see,
n-j
..
_l.o
l
is
a
name
of
El-Mfedeench.
(g.)
[And
*.,jl1,
whichmay
be
rendered
The
object
of
God's
mnercy,
is
commonlyused
in
thepresentday
as
an
epithet
appliedto
the
person,
whoever
he
be,
that
has
diedin
what
is
believed
to
be
the
true
faitli;
as
though
meaningmerely
thedeceased.]
&.
and
uj
-
,()
aor.
3
f(.s
land
app.
l.m.P
also
(see
a.;)];
and
to:?
;
(S,
I
;)
Tlhe
serpent
turnedround
about,
(S,
K,
TA,)
and
twisted,
or
wound,
or
coiled,
itself;
ISd
adds,
0..Jtb
[i.c.
likethe
nill,
brmill-stone];
for which
reason
it
is
said
to
be
$~.lI
(TA.I;t.
('Al
Z'0jo;J_
or
jm.JI
(S,,)
if.
n.
(TA;)
and
l.
,
(,
,)
inf.
n.
~.j;
(TA;)
I
turnedround
the
l_j
or
..j
[i.
c.
the
mill,
or
mill-.
tone]:
(S,
] :)
or
I
made
it:
(V
:)
inthe
K,
the
latter
verbissaid
to
be
extr.;
butnot
so
inthe
T
or S
or
M:
in
the
M
it
is
said
tobe
the
morecommon.
(TA.)
And
*.j
He
magnifiedhim,
or
honouredhim.
(IAar,
TA.)
5:
see
above,
first
sentence.
;v;
(S,
Msb,
1g,
&h)
and1_;,
(Mob,
l,)theformer
of
whichi
is
themore
alpproved,
(TA,)
and
somesay
t
£.j,
(g,)
Amill;
syn.
X
.tb:
(Mb
:)
[and]
a
mill-stone;
iL
e.
the
great
round
stone
with
which
one
grinds:
(TA:)
of
the
fem.
gender:
(Zj,
S,
M
9
b,
K:)
dual
of
thefirst
X
t.j,
(,
M.
b,
Ib,)
and
of
the
second
.j,
(Mqb,*
]g,)
and
of
the
third,
Jtl.v:
(S:)
the
pl.
(of
pauc.,
g)
of
i.-i
(Msb)
[and
of
.]
s
j
and
(of
mult.,
S)
.'g
.
b,
S,
Msb,
K,)
whichi
latter
is
the
pl.
that
is
preferred
accord.
to
IAmb,(Msb,)
and
A.
and
A'.
(Msb,
15,
TA,)
withdamm
and
with
kesr
(Myb,
TA)
to
thej,
(Mqb,)[for
the
last
of
which
.~.
ssubstituted
in
the
Cg,]
and
U
;1
(V,,
TA,)
withdamm,andwith
kesrto
the
,
and
teshdeed
to
the
L.Sq,
TA,)
[in
theC
;,]
and
1.,
(Ms.b,
,)
whichl
is
extr.,
(I,)
said
by
AlHit
to
be
wrong,and
by
IAmb
to
be
anomalous,andby
Zj
to be
not
allowable,
(Msb,)
inthe
T
said
to be
as
though
it
were
a
pL
pl.,
(TA,)
or
it
ispl.
of
*t.:
[and
therefore
regular]:
(
:)
the
dim.
is
$
am.j.
(Zj,
Msb.)
,l.1
[or
:
1
-]
signifies
Tihe
hand-mill.
(MA.)-
[Hence,
A
molar
tooth,
or
grinder:]
i.
q.M,
(,Mb,
;)
pl.
:jl_;,
*
e*
WJ10
--"
isq.
(s
:)
[or
rather]
the
.t_l,
alsocalledthe
.1,
athe
he
twelveteeth,
three
on
eachside
[above
and
belon,],
next
after
the
JI.l
[or
bicuspids].
(Zj,
inhis
"Kliall
el-Insin.")-
[And
app.
Aroller
nwith
which
land
is
rolled
to
crush
the
clods;
as
being
likened
toamill-stone:
see
1
inarL
_,;.,
near
the
end
of
the
paragraph.]
Stones:
and
agreat
rock,
or
?mas
of
stone.
(TA.)
-A
round
piece
of
ground,
riding
above
what
surrounds
it,
(,
I,)
aboutas
large
in
extent
as
a
tnil:
(]g:)
pl.
'.1;:
Is,
TA:)
or
thislatter,
i.
e.
the
pl.,signifies
piseces
of
rugged
ground,
less
thannountains,round,
andrising
above
whatsurrounds
theon:
(M,
TA:)
or
tL.j
.1.jl
&e
means
a
round
and
rugged
place
[or
piece
of
ground]
among
sands:
(Sh,
TA:)
or
a
large
and
trugged
[elevationsuch
as
is
termed];;
or
,.bl,
round,
rising
above
wvhat
surrounds
it,
not
spreading
upon
the
surface
of
the
earth,
norproducing
herbs,
or
legUtninous
planes,
nor
trees.
(ISh,
TA.)
-
A
round
cloud;
[asbeinglikened
to
amill-stone;]
(A
in
art.
:)
or
so
.it~.
LS_M.j
($.)
-
The
>£
or
callous
protuberanceupon
thebreast]
of acamel;
(T,
g,
I
;)
so
calledbecause
of
its
roundness:
(TA:)
pl.
·-4:
(I
:)
whichlikewise
signifiesthe
callous
protuberances
upon
the
knees
of
the
camel.
(T,
TA.)
_-
The
foot
(C"O.')
of
the
camel
and
of
the
clephant:
pl.
.;f
(M,
.)-
A
5;.1.[app.
meaning
a
circling
border]
atound
the
nail.
(TA.)_-The
breast,
or
chest:
pl.,
as
in
the
~--
.5
other
senses
following,
:.;,i.
(S.)-
Spinage,
or
spinach;
(M,
];)
because
of
the
roundnes
ofits
leaves.
(TA.)
-
A
colUctive
body
of
the
members
of
a
houshold.
(ISd,
1,
TA.)
-1
An
independent
tribe:
((,
TA:)
,l1.l
(which
is
its
pl.,
]g,
TA)
signifies
t
independent
tribes,
thatare
in
no need
of
otuers.
(S,
TA.)
-
t
A
large
number
of
camels,
crowding,
or
presing,
together;
(S,
.,
TA;)
also
called
'iL:
(S,
TA:)
or
Jr1
Lmv
means
the
collective
herd
of
the
camels:
and
in
like
manner,
.4iii
l.;
the
collective
body
of
he
people,
or
party.
(ISk,
TA.
).....d
j:
signifies[also]
t
The
chief
of
the
pople,
or
party.
(T,
.,
M,
n,
TA.)
[It
isadded
in
the
TA
that
'Omar
Ibn-El-Khat
b
was
called
.
J
as
though
meaning
t
The
chief
of war;
because
of
his
warlikepropensities:but
it
seems
from
what
here
follows,as
wellas
from
what
precedes,
that
this may
be
a
mistranscription,
for.,JaI
O..,
or
w,iJ
U
.0.
signfies
XThe
mostvehement
part
[or
the
thickest]
of
the
light;
syn.
l1..
:
(S,
Mb
:)
in
the
I
it
is
said
that.a1.
signifies
m.JI
i4.,
and
U;
s
also
,
m..,gJI:
but
it
seems
that
thereis
an
omiion;
133^
M~
~~
J
2
>
S
6
 A
'
A
5
.
J
.
.
44-k&-%k~ duu
Boox
I.]
.,J
LSuJ
 
1058
for
.O,J1
is
[generally]
fem.,
and
in
the
M it
is
said
that,;·,l
j.j
signifies
IJ1k,
[spp.
mean-
ing
the
main
stress,
or
the
hickest,
of
death
in
battle].
(TA.)In
a
sayingrelating
to
'Alee's
having
made
anend
of
j.lIV.- 
this
exprecion
isexpl.
by
A'Obeyd
as
meaning
Tlhe
pilace
around
nthichrevolvedthe
thickest
of
the
fight
(
.Jl
u
au
4t;
5jJI
44Jl)
[in
the
Battle
of
the Camel].
(TA.)
Andl
;';ji
·.,l.;
[whichmay
be
rendered
tThe
main
jtres
of
death
bcset
himround
about]
means
death
befell
him.
(Mqb,
TA.)
..-,
*...
*&.
It~j
[or
a~j
ia,~
meaning
A
serpent
folding,
or
coiling,
itself,
so
as
toresemble
a
nech-ring]:
see
iaj,
in
art.
t.j:
see
;cI,
firstsentence.
a,
dim.
of
Lj,
q. v.
(Zj,
M!qb.)
-I-
c.
0.
.m
.a.w,
Ashallow,
or
a
wide,
[bowl
such
as
is
termed]
a,.J.
(TA.
[It
is
there
mentioned
in
art.
j,
but
belongs
to
art.
j,
q.
v.])
,~.*,
A
place
ofa
millor
naill.stone.
(MA.)
-
Seealso
._
(near
the
end
of
theparagraph),
in
two
places.
_
[Accord.
to
Freytag,it
occurs
in
the
Decwan
of
the
liludhales
as
meaning
t
A
place
where
any
one
standjs
irmly.]
---
>S
A
maker
of
mills
or
mill-stones.
(p,
TA.)~
And
Ioisturoin
the
ground
to
the
extent
of
a
palm.
(Al.n,
TA.)1.
,
aor.
,
inf.
n.
.
said
of
dough,
It
hadin
it
much
water
[so
that
it
was
soft:
see
also
8].
(TA.)
_
,.j,
(JK,T,1
,)
aor.
',
(JK,)
inf.
n.
asabove,
(TJI,)
lie
broke
it,
or
crushed
it,
(JK,
T,)
and
so
made
it
soft:
(T:)
or
he
trod
wpon
it,
(T,
g,)
and
so
made
it
sofJ.
(T.).-
Also
Ilse
mixed
(JK,
g,
KT)
what
is
termed
Ji,
(JK,)
or
wine,
or
beverage:
(9,
1
:) andlikewise
food
withcondiment.
(JK.)
4.
.jI
lie
put
much
waterinto
it
[so
as
to
makeit
softl;
namely,dough.
(TA.)~
[The
inf.
n.]
t..jJ
alsosignifies
The
exceedingthe
umsal,
or
ordinary,
or
the
just,
or
proper,
bounds,
or
degree;
or
the
acting
eregiously,
or
immode-
ratcly;
or
the
like;
(syn.
Al;;)
in
a
thing.
(J.)
8.
.1,
(lApr,
TA,)
inf.
n.
~t;,
(IAar,
T1,
A,)
for
which,
in
somecopies
of
the
Kg,
s
put
itl&.,.tl,
buttheformer
is
the
right
reading,
(TA,)
said
of
dough,
(TA$r,
TA,)
It
was,
or
became,
soft,
or
/lacciL
IAar,
1,
TA.)
-And
t
It
(one's
opinion)was,
or
became,
unsound,
faulty,
or
confued;
syn.
'
l;!.
(1,TA.)
tj
[Lax,orflaccid:
(Golius,
on
theauthority
ofMeyd:)
or
sft]:
see
its
fem.,
AIm,
voce
tj
A
certain
soft,
flaccid,
orfragile,
plant;
(AIJn,
1,;)
as
also
V
U,
with
fet-h,(men-tionedby
ISd,)
or
'
~lj.
(Sointhe
JK.)-
Also
A certain
great
bird,
thatcarries
ff
the
l
.1kA-
[or
rhinoceros].
(1i.
[Seenote
2'2
to
ch.xx.
of
my
translation
of
the
"Thousand
avid
One
Nights."
The
wordis
of
Persian
origin,arabicized;
as
it
is
saidto
be
by
Lth
in
the
sense
next
following.])
-
And
hence,asbeinglikened
thereto,
(TA,)
One
of
the
pieces
with
nhich
the
game
of
chc.u
is
played;
[called
by
us
the
rook,
castle,
and
tower:]
pl.
,
(,)
or
CJ,
(JK,
A,)
orboth.
(TA.)
,.jd
[app.,
in
its
primary
acceptation,
S,ftne&s
of
a
substance,such
as
earth
&c.:
and
hence,]
softness,
delicateness,
or
easiness,
of
life.
(JK,
TA.)-It
isalsousedas
anepithet.
(TA.)
You
say
1.~.j
)l
Soft
land,
of
owhich
the
soil
is
good;
asalso
*t'4:
pl.
&i;:
(J1C:)or
wide
and
soft
land,
whether
leoel
or
notlevel:
(ISh:)
or
soft,
or
yielding,
land:
(S,
K,
TA:)
and
t
i,j,
(1K,
TA,)
with
teshdeed
and
medd,
(TA,)
[inthe
CK
,1.:,
without
teshdeed,]signifies
the
like:
(IAp,
1g:)
or
thislast
(.),
wide
land:
(I
:)
or
tumid
land
or
earth,
that
breaks
in
pieces
beneath
the
tread:
and
its
pl.
is
k
t,lj.
(JK,
15.)
And
11
';
What
is
soft
of
soil,
or
of
moist
earth.
(TA.)
And?.
.p
A
life,
or
state
of
life,
that
is
amnple,
unstraitened,
or
eas,
(8,
K,
TA,)
and
soft.
(TA.)
_
See
also
j.
CL:
see
see
eib
.
and
tl,,
applied
to
mud,
or
clay,
(JK,
g,)
and
to
dough,
(JK,)
Thin,
and
soft:
(JK,
15,
A:)
and
t
5.
soft,
or
moist,
mud
or
clay.
(KL.)
1tp
:
see
the
nextprecedingparagraph.
tlIi
5.a.;,
appliedto
a
man,
and
to
a
camel,
Lax,
or
not
firm,
in
make,by
reason
of
fatnscu.
(JK.)
ejt
vC
Intoxicated,
full
of
drink;
(1];)
as also
.
(TA.)
^-,
applied
to
a
man,
and
to
a
camel,
Flaccid,
or
flabby,
byreason
of
old
age
or
of
emaciation.
(JK.)
1.
'o,,
or.
-,
inf.
n.
,,
It
(a
thing,
Myb,
or
a
price,
.,
A)
sas,
or
became,
cheap,
low-priced,
or
own.
(8,
A,
Msb,
V,
TA.)
[Accord.
to
all
of
these
authorities,
this
seemsto
be
the
pri-marysignification:
but
Et-Tebreezee
(Ham
p.
47)
thinks
it
to
be
from
&.j;
ppliedto awoman,
as
meaning
"soft,
or
tender."]
Some
say
~,.
also;
but
this
is
not
of
established
authority.
(MF.)
,_~,
aor.
',
(M,
A,
Mob,
]g,)
inf.
n.
[BooK
I.
L
it
(9,
M,
A,
Mob,
K)
and
L;,L
(.,
M;
Mgb,
,K)
and
Ot,;,
(Ltl,
TA,)
It
(a
thing,
~,
or
the
body,
9,
Msb,
or
flesh,
A)
was,
or
became,
solf,
or
tender;
(S,
M,
A,
Msb,
g,
TA;)
and
softto
the
feel:
(Msb:)
and
inlike
manner
,..ij
said
of
a
girl:
(A:)
or,
said
ofa
woman,inf.
n.
Otv;,
she
was,
or
became,
soft,
or
tender,
and
delicate,
or
thin,
in
her
external
skin:
and
said
of
a
woman's
fingers,
they
were,
or
became,
soft,
or
tender:
but
whensaid
of
a
plant,
inf.
n.
a.oL,
it
was,
or
became,
soft,
flaccid,
or
easily
or
quickly
broken:
(Lth
:)
[anvd
said
of
a
twig,
orrod,
it
was,
or
became,
firesh,
or
succulent,
and
soft,
or
tentler:
sce
e,o.]
2.
1.jb
J
ja,
inf.
.
j,
le
had
indulgence,
license,
or
facilitation,
granted,
or
conceded,
to
himin,
or
with
respectto,
such
a
thing.
(Q,
A,'
J.*)
You
say,
:)
,i
1
Ii.,
inf.
n.
as
above,
Tlhe
lan
has
been
indilgent
to us
in,
or
with
respectto,such
athing;
has
facilitatel
t
to
us;
as
also
V.il,
inf.
n.
Li.l;t.
(Msb.)And
UI
jl.
[or,morecommonly,
il,]
I
game
license,
or
per-
mission,to
such
a
oneto
do
such
and
such
things
after
my
forbildding
him
to
do
them.
(TA.)
4.
1.a
lIe
(God,
.,
A,
Meb,
or
a
man,
JK)
made
it
(a
thing,
MIb,
or
a
price,
8,
A)
cheap,
low-priced,
or
low.
(JK,
S,
A,
AMob,
1.)'
r^j,
in
this
sense,is
notknown.
(M.sb.)
Also
[leffound
it
to
be
cheap,
lon-prired,
or
low.
(lg.)-Also,
(g,)
or
*t
j,,
($,
A,)
lre
boueght
it
chea.p,
or
at
a
lon,
price.
(S,
A,
K.)
-
See
also
2.
5.
,adJ
3
le
toolk,
or
arailel
himself
of,
or
allowed
hinself,
indulgence,
license,
or
facilita.
tion;
(A,
TA;)
he
did
not
go
to
the
utmost
length;
($,
Mob,
];)
[he
relaxed,
or
remittedl;]
in
('s)
such
a
thing;
(
;)
in
affairs;
(A;)
or
in
the
affair.
(Msb.)
Yousay
also,
..
L
j
Ile
took
what
was
easily
attainable,
of
his
riglit,
or
due,
anddid
notgototheutmostlength.
(A.)
8.
..
aL.3Il:see
4.
-
Also,
(S,
.Sgh,
,)
or
?adi..j..l,
(A,)
He
reckoned
it
cheap,
or
low-
priced:
($,
A,
Sgh,
V:)
and
t
the
latter,
heJam
it,
or
udged
it,
to
be
so.
(Lthi,
.)
10.
a
1-l:
see
8,
in
twoplaces.
.;
applied
to
a
thing,
(A,
K,)
or
to
the
body,
(.,
Msb,)and
toflesh,
and
to
aplant,
(A,)
Soft,
or
tender;
(9,
M,
A,
Myb,
1(
;)
and
&ofi
o
thefedel:
(Mb
:)
and
* ,
signifies
thesame,
(AA,
M,
J,)
applied
to
a
garment,
or
piece
of
cloth,
(AA,
~,)
as
alsothe
former:
(TA:)
fem.
of
each
with;
:
(M,
TA:)
;
is
also
appliedto
a
girl,
(A,)
andto
a
woman,
(g,
TA,butomitted
in
theCIS,)andto
fingers,
signifying
not
rigid
ortough:
(g
:)
or,
appliedto
a
woman,it
signifies
soft,
or
tender,
and
delicate,
or
thin,
in
herexternal
skin:
and
appliedto
a
woman's
fingers,
soft,
or
tender:
but
,.
appliedto
a
plant,
soft,
flaccid,
or
eaily
or
quickly
broken:
(Lth,
TA:)
and
appliedto
a
twig,
or
rod,
frek,
or
succulent,
and
tofl,
or
tender:
(Mb
:)
the
pl.
 
O,)J
--
".-j
of
,j
is
,tu.j4:
(Mb
) and
that
of
L;o.
is
.i5
1
zj,
which
is
irreg.
[as
such,
but
reg.
as
pl.
of
t
i.j]1;
(Ill,
TA;)
occurring
in poetry.
(TA.)
Yousay,
J.q
A:
,
.
He
is
soft,
or
tender,
in
body.
(s.)
And
O.sJI
a,.j
;1.
A woman
eoJf,
or
tender,
in
body.
(IDrd,
TA.)
).j
[see
1,
of
which
it
is
the
inf. n., in the
first
of
the
senses
explained
above.
-Also
The
act
of
making cheap;]
a
subst.
from
1..jI
in
the first
of
the
senses
here assigned thereto.
(M,b.)
'.ii
(.,
A,Myb,
0)
and
'L,
1
.j
(A,
M;b,,)
Indulgence,
license
or
facilitation;
(9,
A,
M
9
b,
1;)
in
an
anffir:
(8,
A,
Myh:)
pl.
,
.
(A,
M,b)
and
ajLa
nd
o
and
;JGi
.
(Mqb.)You
say,
La.j)
j
j
[Thou
hadS,
or
#halt hare,
in,
or
nith
respect
to,
this,
indul-
genre,
licents,
or
facilitation].
(A.)
-
t
Indul-
gence
granted, or
conceded, by
God
to
his
servant,
in
a
matter
which
lie
alleviates
to him.
(A,
..)
-[t
An
ordinantice
qf
indulgence;
such as
theshortening
of
prayer
in
travelling,
and the
like:
pl.
w,a.j,
of
which
we
have an
ex.
in
the
follow-
ing
trnd.:]
_
4.0
L;
.l
4"X
JSI;
,.i
[t
God
loreth
that
his
ordinances
of
indulgence
be
performedl,like
as
lile
loreth thathisobligatory
ordflinancesbe
performed].
(A.)
-I
A
portion,or share,
of
water:
(A:)
or
a
time,
or
turn, in
drinkingy. (1(.)
u;.
A
cheap,
or
low-priced,
thing;
(MRb;)
a
low
price.
(,,
A.)
=
A
quich
death.
(Lth,
A,
.) -
See also
,,&.,
in
two
places.
So.ft,
without
strength
or
sturdiness,
atnd
without
endurance: or
stupid,
dull, wanting
in
intelli-
gence;
syn.
Je..
(T.A.)
,j
A
ewe-lamb;
(S,
K;)
as
also
t
and
?s.]j:
(Q
:)
the
male is
called
3
":
(S:)
pl.
[of
pauc.]
Jv.l
(1)
and
[ofmult.]
J
and
J.j,
(, I,)
whichi
last
is
of
an
extr.
form,
(TA,)
and
X
and
i.
and
(g.)
;
see
the preceding
paragrph.
i.'
,A
poseor
and
rearet
ofer,e-lambs.
(..)
1 .
,~.,
.,
Msb,
V,)
aor.
!,
(]g,)
inf. n.
l,;
(l,
Mb
;)
and
.,
aor.
A;
(J
;)
It
(the
voice,
C,
TA,
and
speech,
!g,
TA)
ma,
or
became,
sojf,
or
gentle,
and
eay:
(,* 1],
TA:)
[or
it
(the
voice)
was,
or
became,soft,
or
gentle,
plaintive,
and
meneow:
(see
s-
:)]
it
(a
thing,
and
the
speebh,)
mag,
or
became,
easy:
(Msb:)
L.tI.L
in
speech
is
a
good
quality in
women.
(TA.)
One
ays
also
of
a girl,
,
(V, TA,)
inf.
n.
as
above,
(TA,)
meaning
/he
was,
or
became,
eay
[and
soft
or
gentle]
in
speec:
(;
TA:)
andin
like
manner,
of
a
[young
gazelle
such
as
is
termed]
i
[meaning
in
voice,
or
cry]:
and
,a;,
said
of a
she-gazelle,
means
she
uttered
a
[soft
or
gentle]
cry.
(TA.)-I.
1w-
ZJ.
and
I..44
Lt
:
see
4...Hence,
perhaps,]
;
Ws)3,
aor.
'
and
:,
t
She
(a woman)
played
with
her
child:
(]:)
[or,]
accord. to
the
"Nawta-
dir
el-AgAb,"
~ .3
and
[fi*j~,
app.
.,.3
and.
'.;.
in
both cases,]
said
of
a
woman,
mean
,,j3
1
[She
treats,
or
regards, her
boy
with
mercy,
pity,
or
compassion;
&c.]: (TA:)
and
;
J:l
#;,_
means
;z.j
i
[I
treated,
or
regarded,
the
thing with
mercy,
&c.]:
(],
TA:)
AZsays
thatndj,
or.
-,
inf.n.
'a;j,
and
4*;,
aor.
,
inf.
n.
ia,,
are
syn.:
(S:)
and
he
says
that,.m. [thus
accord.to
the
TA]
is
of
thedial.
of
some
of
the
people
of
El-Yemen:
it
is
tropical:
Lh.,
also,
mentions
Ls~j,
aor.
,
inf.
n.
.Aj,
asmeaning
t
lie
was,
or
became,
inclined
tofavour
him,
or
affectionate
to hi,n.
(TA.)
,s,
said
of a
skin
for
water
or
milk,
It
was,
or
became,
stinkting.
(TA.)
2.
(M:b,)
iif.
n.j-
S,
S
Mb,
TA,)
He
made
it
soft,
or
genttle:
(S,
TA:)
or
he
made
it
eanJsy:
namely,[the
voice,
(see
1,)
or]
speeclh.
(Mob.)
-
Hence,
(Mgb,]~,) or
from
.
signifying,
as some
say,
The
cutting
off[a
thing],
or
cutting
[it]
at
its
extremity,
or
curtailing
[it],
(S,)
the
j
of
thename,
(8,
Mah,
K,)
in
thevocative
form
of
speech;
(9;)
[accord.
to generalopinion,]
because
it
facilitates
the pronunciation
thereof;
(1];)
i.e.
the
[abbreviating
by the]
eliding
of
the
end
thereof,for
thealleviation
of
the
utterance;
(Mqb;)
the
curtailing
a
name
of
its
last letter,
or
more;
(g,
TA;)
aswhen, to
one
whose
name
is
.
or
!to,
you say
j. %
or
JL4
b:
but
accord. to
Z,
in
the
A,
it
is from
the
.neeJ
of
the
hen;
because
this
is
only
on
the
occasion
of
the
cutting short
(Lj)
[of
the
laying]
of
the
eggs:
(TA:)
[in
like
manner
also]
the
.,'j
of
the diminutive
is
the
[abbreviatinj
thereof
by the]
cutting
off
of
[one
or
more
of]
the
augmentative
letters
[and
sometimes
of
radi-
cal letters];
as when, in forming the diminutive
of
_,i
[and
that
of.
,l;],
one says
.i,.
[and
"].
lCar
p.
334.)
-
a
lj.l_._.,
inf
n.
asabove,
He
made the
hen
to
cleave
to,
or
heepto,
[or
brood
upon,]
her
eggs
[for
the
purpose
of
hatching
them].
(M, V.)
[,*.j
also
signifies
IHe
constructed,
or
cased,
a building,
or
a
floor
&c.,
With.,s.j:
but
this
is
perhaps
post-classical.]
4.tv
,rc
~ i.l;
(9,I5;)
or
,:i.
alone;
(JK;)
and
l>;;
,
and
(1s,)
aor.
,
(TA,)
inf.
n.
&
and
i.;
and
I..;
(1;;)
She
(a
domestic
hen,
JK,
9,
],
and
an
ostrich,
JK,
TA)
brooded
upon
her
eggs,
to
hatch
them.
(JK,
~,
.)
8.
i,Jie
,):.*
l
t
She
(a
camel)
loved,
af-
fected,
or
inclined to,
and
kept to,
or
caoe
to,
her
young
one.
(TA.)
,*&j
t
Favour,
or
affection;
or
mercy,
pity,
or
compassion:
and
love:
and
gentlenes;
(],
TA
;)
as
also
t'a,.j
[which appears to
be
themore
common,
andwhich
is
mentioned
above
a
an
ilf.
n
:
(,
J,*
TA:)
the
latter
is
nearly
the
same as
i,.;.
(9.) One
says,
' " ;
jI,
t
His
lore,
and
his
gentlene,
fell,
or
lighted,
upon him.
(S.)
And
t
d.
dL
Ji'
and
', (],
TA,)
i.
e.
t[He
made
iofaU,
or light,
upon him,
or
bestomeed
upon
Aim,]
his
love,
and