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Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 1 - page 301 to 400

Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 1 - page 301 to 400

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Published by Silky Beaver
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.

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Published by: Silky Beaver on Jun 07, 2013
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BooK
I.]
Prophet:(B4,
Jel:)
or
shall
becloven
on
the
dal
of
resurrection:but
theformer^isconfirmed
bj
anotherreading,
°,JI
T
d.i:
(Bd:)
oraccord.
toEr-R
lghib,
themeaning
is,
t
the
cas
Aath
become
manifest.
(TA.)
One
says,
;:i
rJl
[The
thintt
became
cloven,
&c.,
is
alves].
(f.)
[And
j
:Jl
It
became
clove
&c.,
from
it:
and
it
branched
off.
from
it;
as
a
river
from
another
river,
andthe
like.
And
I..
*
JIAsIt
clave
asunder
romn
orer
it,
so
as
to
disclose
it:
*e
also
8.]
[Hence,]
jI.
J;ti;
VUl
.
t
Such
a
one
iras
as
though
his
inter;or
re
f~illed
nwith
anger
so
that
le
split.
(TA.).
And
l"I %
JI
t
The
affiair,
or
state
of
affairs,
becamediscomposed,
derantiged,
or
disordered:
(;,
I(,
TA:)
and
.tl
lG
l..
,t,
and
t
C
-,
(Lth,
M,
TA,)
t
th'
affair,
or
state
of
qffairs,
becamediscomposed,
deranged,
or
di.-
organized,
by
separation:
(Lth,
TA:)
and
,;
j*'l
t
tihe
aqffair,
or
state
of
affairs,
becanme
discomposed,
deranged,
or
disorganized,
being
incongruos,
or
inconsistent.
(M,
TA.)
And
.s1
I.
~
.
;
t
[Thecompact
of
allrjiance,
or
obedience,
became
brohen].
(M.)
-
L- .
said
of
lighltning:
see
1,
in
the
latter
halfof
tlc
para-graph.
8.
JIi!
signifies
The
taking
the
.j
of
athing,
(9,
],)
i.
e.
the
half
thlereof.
(S.)
One
says,
UUI
SLl
He
took
tbe
j
[or
hualf]
f
tAhe
thing.
(T4.)
And
t
The
taling
[or
de-
rivin!l]
a
word
from
aword,
(.;,
1.,)
with
the
conditiot
of
reciprocal
rdlation
in
meaning
and
[radical]
complition,
andl
ef
reciprocal
difb.rence
informn:
[and
it
is
of
thre
kinds:]
.AIl
j
't
1
is
that
derivation
in
whichthere
is
a
recip;rocal
relation
between
tiwtwo
words
in
the
letters
and
in
the
order
[thercof];
as in
,.firom
.n
Jl:
j3I
UtlI
is
that
in
whitch
thereis
a
reciprocalrelation
between
the
tno
wrords
as
totheletter
and
tle
neaning,exclusirely
of
the
order;
as
in
4
from
4
1:
jU=*
%i;:8l
is
that
in
whichthereis
a
reciprocalrelation
betveen
tlw
two
wordl
in
the
place
[or
places]
of
utterance;as
in
*
from
=t.
(KT.)
[Yousay,
l
I;.
or
hS
or
,
i,
and
tIi,
lIe
derivedaword,
and
a
name,
-.
1
'p.
from
another;
and
t
'L
sometimessignifiestile
same,
as
is
shlown
by acitation
voce..j.]
_
[And,
as
jn.
with
L"-!,
(see8
in
art.
tj",)]
The
construceting,
or
founding,
(ea,)
of
a
thing
of,
or
from,
what
is
originated
witlwut
premeditation.
(M.)
-
And
S
The
taking
to
the
rightand
Ifti,
(9,
V,
TA,)
not
pursuing
the
right,or
direct,
course,
(9,
TA,)
in
speech,
and
in contention,
ordisputation,or
litigation:
(S,
],
TA:)
or.o.0
jti;,l
ignifies.
the
taking
to
the
rightand
left
in
peech
:
(so
in
a
copy
of
the
M:
[but
I
thinkthat
the
right
readingis
.fil
j.~
?l,
agreeablywith
what
here
follows:])you say,,
l
u
-l,
and
.Z.S,.J
;i.
(T..)
See
also6.
And
[in
l;ke
manner]
one
says
of
a
horse,
..
1
..lt
He
Bk.
I.
rent
to the
rightand
left
in
Ahit
rmning.
(M.
Y
[8ee
also
Jid1.])..
j1
j;i
thT/e
,road
went
[or
branched
off]
intothe
desert.
(TA.
[Seealso
7.])
10.
jtlqJtjl
:.wl
He
turned
thie
sackupon
one
of
hist
twosides
(eLs
,~1
L,c),
in
order
to
pass
through
a
door.
(TA.)
_-
[ 1,
as
stated
by
Freytag,
isexpl.
by
Jac.
Schultens,but
on
whatauthority
is
notsaid,
assignifying
"Prodiit,
I
man
e.ttus
evasit."]
R.
Q.
1.
;"
(JK,
S,
,) inf.
n.
': .,
(S,)
said
of
a
stallion
[camel],
1Ie,
brayed
[in
his
ai=,
i
r
faucial
bag].
(JK,
S,
K.)
[It
is
said
that]theprimarymeaning
of
~;.is
Loudss
of
voice;
or
the
beinloud
in
voice.
(JK.)..
And
said
of
a
sparrow,
It
uttered
acry:
(K,
TA:)
or
one
says
of
a
sparrow,
?'
i
J.
-
[app.
meaning
It
maes
a
loud
twittering
in'
its
Cry].
(S.)
A
sing.
of
j,i,;
($,
Mgh,
Mhb,
1;)
origin-ally
an
inf
n.;
(S,
Mqb;)
An
openingforming
an
inxtcrXtice
ina
thing:
(Msb:)
or
a
fimure,
cleft,
ch
,k,
plit,
slit,
rent,crack,
or
thelike,
syn.
S,,,
in wood
or
astick,orina
wall,
or
in
a
glassvessel
[&c.]:
(T,
TA:)
[or]
a
place
that
is
j_
[i.
c.
cloven
or
cleft,
split,
&c.:
(sec
1,
first
sentence:and
see
also
,.L
:)
and
often
signifying
an
incision,
a
gasl,
or
a
urrowr,
or
trench]:
(M,
.1
:)
as
thoughan
inf.
n.
used
as asubst.
in this
sense:
pl.
asabove,
3J:
(M:)
it
differs
from
,li.U,
(S,
Mglh,)
by
having
a
general
significa-
tion:
(Mgh:)
accord.
to
Yailoob,
one
says,
)iJ
i'
Q
S,
g
gh)
and
t.
(S)
[i.
e.
In
the
Aand,
or
arm,
of
ucl
a
one
are
cracks,
or
tihe
liAc,
and
in
his
foot,
or
lej]:
but
[it
is
asserted
that
in
this
case]one
shouldnotsay
vlit:
(S,
Mgh:
[see,
however,
this
word:])
and
hence,
...I.i7TAe
rench,
or
oblong
excavation,
in
the
;niddle
of
the
grame:
and
accord.
to
As,
s~i.
signifies
.
[i.
e.
fssunres,
&c.,]
in
mountains,and
in
tle
earth,orground.
(Mgh.)-The
ri/na
muldw
ofa
woman;
i.
e.
the
gap
[or
chink]
betrween
the
two
edges,
or
borders,
of
tle
labia
i
majora
of
er
tulva:
as
also
j...
(M,
L.)_
And
The
daybreak.
(S, gI,
TA.)
See
alsothe
nextparagraph,firstand
fifthsentences.
-
And
see
thelast
two
sentences
of
thesame
para-graph.
v
The
half
(S,
Mgh,
M
9
b,
1)
of
athing
(S,
M,b,
)
of
any
kind;
as
also
V
J:
(V,:)
orthe
half
of
a
thing
when
it
is
cloven,
orsplit,
or
dividedlengthwise;
(M;)
as
also
?
i:.
(A.in,
'
,.
M,1,0)
One
says,
;1t1
,
.
."
and
&t
S;tl
I
took
the
alf
of
tf
e
sheep
oj
goat:
(S,
TA:)
thevulgar
pronouncethe
&,
with
fet-*h.
(TA.)And
XjIU
JIa
Take
thou
thi
(
[i.
e.
half]
of
the
suep
or
goat.
(TA.)
Henoe
i
the trad.,
;j,.3.., Iia.
i.
e.
[Give
ye
I
alms
hougl
it
be
but]
tlwe
half
of
a
date;
meaning
n
deem
npt
anything
little
that
is
given
as
alms.
]
1577
(TA.)And
!,Z.
j
jjl
and
:JI
f
j,
(0,
1,
[in
the
Cs
and
in my
MS.
copy
of
the
]g
;,
but
theformer
reading
appearsto
be
theright,
~'
being
an
inf.
n.
as
in
a
similarsayinginthe
former
half
of
thefirstparagraph
of
this
art.,
and
Lj:
being
asubst.
uied
asan
inf.
n.
or
for
gl,l)
rmeaning
[The
property
is
betweea
us]
two
halva,
equal
[in
dioision].
(.)_
[Hence,]
A
certainkind
of
thejinn,orgenii;
(Ibn-'Abbid,O,
I;)
a
species
of
diabolical
beings
having
the
form
of
the
half
of a
human
being.
(Izzwin hisDescr.
of
the
Jinn.)
-
The
lateral
Ialf,
or
half
and
aide;
as
whenonesays
that
a
person
paralyzed
has
a
.j
inclining;
and
as
when
one
speahk
of
the
~j
of
a
JA
[meaning
eitlwr
of
the
twodorsers,
or
panniers,
or
oblong
chests,
shicA
are
borne,
one
on
eitler
side,
by
a
camtd,
and
hich,it
a
mall
tentover
them,
compose
a
J
:
see
this
last
word,
and
i,].
(Mgh.)
-
The
side
of
the
body;
as
whenonesays
of
a
person
that
his
left
~
wau
grazed,orabraded.
(Mgh.)
[Hence,]
onesays
of
a
horse,
,g-i
ur
d.a
[lHe
inclines,
or
leanu,
upon
one
of
hit
wo
.
(0.)
[And
;j
;
.and
,
l.
e
Jnt,
or
walled,
incliningupon
onede.]
_
The
side,
or
lateral
part,
(Lth,
Mob,
I,
TA,)
of
a
thing;
the two
sides
of
a
tlling
a-
being
called
;t1;:
(Lth,
TA
:)
or,
as
some
say,
(TA,)
the
side
of
a
mountain.
(S,
TA.)
[Hence,]
one
says,
,e
&'1
e
I ~
'>
t
[Such
a
one
is
of
the
collateral
clas
of
thl
ki,sfolk,
ortribe,
not
of
the
main
stock
thereof].
(Mgh
in
art..)
I.
q.
t
L
;
(,
Mob,
];)
[which
primarily
signifies
The
cloven-off
!alf
of
a
thing;
i.c.,]
when
a thing
is
cloven
in
halves,
each
of
the
halves
iscalled
the
J;.
-
of
the
other.(9,
I.)
[And
hence,
t
The
counter-
part
of
a
person
or
thing:
andthis
appears
to
be
meant
by
J,
and
accord.
toSM
in
the
]C,
whereit issaid
that'
is
syn.
with
t
;eU;
for
they
addimmediately
after:]
ono
says
j
L
J j3
0-
i
t
[lie
is
my
brotler,and
the
counterpartof,nycelf];
(S,
TA;)
as though
ho
were
cloven
from
me,
because
of
theresemblance
of
each
of
us
tothe
other.
(TA.)
One
says
also,
JiL
it
e:,
meaning
t
This
is
the
lileof
him,
or
it.
(TA.)
And
[hence]
it
is saidin
a trad.,
i'Cl
Jlal
SL
,
[inwhich
SU:
is
the
pl.
of
t
JL
as
fem.,
or
of
iJ--
inthe
samesense,]meaning
t
Women
are
tAe
likes
oj
men
in
natural
dispo-sitions;as
thoughi
they
werecloven
from
them;
or
because
Eve
was
creotedfrom
Adam.
(TA.)
.
And
A
man's
brother;
(M;)
and
so
t
i;
(S,
M,
O, J.,
TA;)
meaning
a
brotler
by
tihe
fatler
and
mother;
(TA;)
from
J
asmeaning
'either
halfof a
thing
that
is
cloven
in
halves;"
(,
TA;)
oras thoughtherelationship
of
one
were
cloven
from
thatof
the
other:
(IDrd,O,
i
:)
pl.
of
the
latter
sli,I.
(M,
M.h.)
-
Andl
a
iame
for
A
thing
at
n,lich
one
loiJs:
(Lth,O,
[:)
but
this
is
app.taken
from
the
following
19'J
1
 
[Boo
i.
J:
saying
of
Lth,
in
which
I
think
JI
is
a
mis-
transcription
for
;JI,
meaning
"the
crack,"
&c.:]
J11
it
the
inf.n.
of
-;,
and
,1
is
a
namefor
thatat
which
onelooks [i.
e.
for
the
visible
effect
of
theact
signified
bythe verb],
and
the
pl.
is
9
J
[which
is
well
knownas
the
pl.
of
I.1].
(JK.)
Also
i.q.
t
'
,
M,
0,
Msb,
])
i.e.
DiSiculy,
hardship,
distress,
a.fliction,
trouble,
incovenisce,
fatigu,
or
wearines;
(M,
TA
;)
and
languor,
or
lack
of
power,
that
overtakes
the
mind
and
the
body;
(Er-Righib,
TA;)
and
so
?,;(IJ,
9,M,
O,
K;)
thus
it
issometimes
pronounced
with
fet-h.;
mentionedby
A'Obeyd;
(1
;)
and
by
AZ;
(M;)
orthis
is
an
inf.
n.,
and
a~~~~~~~~~~~et
p.
is
the
subst.;
(0,
1
;)
and
V
I
and
f ib
alsosignify
the
same
as
,
(1,)
or
such
as
oraiaa
manin
cons~ence
of
travel;
(TA;)
ana
the
ps.
of
theme
twoare
;,
(1,
TA,)
men-tioned
by
Fr,
(TA,)
and
L',(1,
TA,)
men-
tionedontheauthority
of
someone
or
more
of
[the tribe
of]
](eys:
(TA:)
the
pl.
of
t i;
is
,).t
and
t-
;.
(TA.)
Hence,
in
the
]ur
[xni.
7],
V
Y~
_to
41
%MQ
l,JO
[Which
ye
sdu
not
reach
sav
with
dfficulty,
or
diu-
tres,
&c.,
of
the
sms];
where
sozo
read
t
.
(%'
TA.).
it
primarily
signifies
The
half
of
a
garment
[cotutingof
two
oblong
~
ie
nseed
together,
side
by
side]:
then
it
wasapplied
to
[such]
a
garmenlt
as
it
is
[when
conplete:
in
both
of
thcsesenses
it
is
used
in
the
present
day]: (Er-Rrghib,
TAj.)
or
a
pice
(1.1)
of
a ga,ment:
(Mgh:)
or
the
&
of
.1.
[thus,andthus
only,in the
~,meaning
of
garmentsand
of
cloths,
for
it
is
of
both,]
is
an
oblong
piece;
syn.
1i
ela'-
I
-~:
(My
15
:)
tit
is
often appliedto
an
oblongpiece
of
cloth
of
those
pieees
of
which
a
tent
is
composed:]
pl.-
and
0j'..
(M,Mgh,
TA.)
One
says,
*A
s&1
e1;
X
i[Such
one
sell
pieces,
or
oblongpie,
&c.,
of
linen].
(Mgh.)
_-
Also
A
piece
of
a
;j..1
[q.
v.].
(B,
TA
in
art.
,.)-And
A
piece,
or
plortion,
[or
tract,]
of
Hell;
likewie
pronounced
t "
.
(Ham
p.
816.)And
A
far
journey;
as
also
t
',
(9,
M,1],)
sometimes
thus
pronouncedwith
kesr:
( :)
afar,
longjoerney:afar-extending
space:
(TA
:)
or
a
road
diefficult
to
him
roho
travel
it:
(Mgh:)
or
[simply]
ajourneJ:
and
i.
q.
IW
[so
in my
copy
of
the
M9b,
app.a mistranscription
for
4.,
.
e.
a
mountain-road,
&c.]:
l,
.
(Mb.)
And
A
part,
region,
quarter,
or
tract,
(Ibn-'Arafcl,
Er-lRghib,
K,TA,)
towards
which
one
dranwnear,
(lbn-'Arafelh,
TA,)
or
towards
whichthe
trareeUer
directshimself,
(]g,
TA,)
[like
,,]
or
in
the
rvachinlg
(f
which
one
is
overtaken
by
difliculty,
or
distress;
(Er-Riighib,
TA;)
And
t
i
signifiesthe
samc.
(K.)_And
Distance;
and
so
V.( .) -
See
also
&,
ast
sentence
but
one.
spli/;nter
(9,
)
that
splits
of,
($,)
or
a
piece
(M,
Mgl,
TA)
split
off,
(M,
TA,)
of
a
plank,
($,
M,
15,
TA,)
or
of
wood,
(TA,)
or
of
a
piece
of
wood,
(S,Mgh,)or other
thing:
(M,
TA:)
a
piece
split,
or
diided,
lengthise,
of
a
staff,
orstick,and
of
a garment, or
piece
of
cloth,
&c.:
(IDrd,
O,
:)
and
a
piece
split
(15,
TA)
from
anything;
sach
as
the
haf:
(TA:)
pl.
.;:,.
(O,
TA.)
Onesays
of
him
who
is
angry,
.1
01
-
;.
ja
;a
-
a
t
[He
became
excited
by
sharpness
of
temper,
or
angriness,
and
he was
as
though
a
bit
flew
from
him
upon the
ground,
anda
bitinto
thesky].
(S,*
M,
TA:
in
theS,
wij1
i
&c.
is
omitted.)
Seealso
J,,
first three
sentences.
-See
also
eS,
'3
AiA,
n four
places.
-
And
see
Lj.,
again,last
sentence
but
one.
3J The
quality,
in a horse,
(M,
],)
and
in
a
man,
(M,)
denoted
by
the
epithet
J;l
[q.
v.].
(M,
k.)
,.iA
[a
pl.
of
which
thesing.
is
not
mentioned]
Enemies.
(TA.)
jUi.
A
cracking
in
woeral
places,
(j':J,
S,
1,)
or
cracks,
(Mgh,)
or
a
certain
disease
occa-
sioningcracks,
(M,)
in
the
pasterns
of
horpes
or
the like,
(S,
M,Mgh,
]1,)
and
in their
hoofs,
(M,
Mgh,)
and
sometimes
rising
to
theirshanks:
so
says
Yayoob:
(S:)
and,
accord.
to
Lth,
(Mgh1,)
andAz,
(TA,)
a
cracking
in
scveral
places(Ji3)
of
the
skin,
from
cold
or
some
other
cause,
in
the
hands
or
arms,
and
the
face:
(Mgh1,
TA:)
or
it
signifies also
any crack,
or
slit,
in
the shin,
from
dimase:
(M,
TA:)
A
9
says
that
it
is
in
the
hand
or
arm,
and
the
foot
or
leg,
of a
human
being,
and
in
the
fore
leg
and
hind
leg
of
an
animal:
(Mgh,
TA:)
butthis
is
inconsistent
with
what
is
said
by
Ya.koob
[as
stated
voce
Ci,,
first
sentence].
(Mgh.)
See also
o.,1:
and
.,.
td:
see
{,
in
fiveplaces.
-
4
,,
"
[so
in
a
copy
of
the
M,buttheright reading
may
be
3.1
i1J,,
whichoccursin
the
next
sentence
of
the
M,]
i.
q.
°;
5
[expl.in
the
9,
in
art.
..,
as
meaning
Lightning
that
cleaves the
clouds,
and
extends
high,
into
the
midst
of
the
sky,without
going
to
the
right and left:
but
see
UiC_]. (M.)
Also
A
adlf
that
has
become
firm,
or
strong:
(O,
]
:)
and
applied
likewiseto
t
a
man
[that
has
become
so;
by
way
of
comparison]:
(O
:)
or
a
bullsuch
as is
termed
[i.
e.
in
his
second,
or
third,year].
(JK.)
iL,i
A
certain
bird;
also
called
t
;
(M,
1
:)
and
t
°Q
is
the
dim.
thereof:
(K
:)
AHat
says,
the
v
ai,i
is
a
very
little
thing,
grayish
(
),
of
the
colour
of
ashes;
ten
a,d,Jflcen
(if
whatare
thtu
called
congregate;
and
I think
it
to
be
the
,
which
is
a
U.s
of
the
[q.
v.];
it
is
somew,hdt
dusky;
and
itsfoj,rm,n
is
the
Jbrm
of
these,
but
it
is smaller
than
they:
it
is
called
V
"a4L
ecanse
of
its
smallness:
IDrd,
in
theclass
of
J.
I,
mentions
t
JI
as
signifying
a certain
splecies
of
birds
[app.
as
a
col].
gen.
n.,
of
which
the
n.
un.
is
with
].
(O,
TA.)
ki'e;
[accord.
to
Golius,
A
frse;
as
from
thelCL;butnot
soexpl.
in
my
copy
of
that
work._]
An
interveningspace
or
tract
be-
twn
tro
elongated,
or
extended,
tracts
of
sand,
(S,
M,*
O,
K,0[inthe
last
of
which
J
1
is
erroneously
put
for
'
,,Jt,])
thus
expl.
to
ABn
by
an
Arabof
the
desert,
(TA,)
producing
herb-
age:
(?,M,O,15:)
or
a
rugged
tract
betwCen
two
elongated,
or
extended,
tracts
of
sand,pro.
ducinggood
herbage;
(M,
TA;)
so
in the
T,
asexpl.to
itsauthor
by
an
Arab
of
thedesert:
(TA:)
pl,
;,,
(T,g,
O,
1, TA,)
expl.
by
some
as
meaning
sands
themselves:
(TA:)
or a
great
piece
of
sand:
or
a
piece
of
sand
betwcn
tno
pieces
thereof.
(Ham
p.
282.)
[In
the
A
and
TA
voce
Li,
it
is
used
as
meaning
A
dice
cut
off of
a
melon
&c.]
_
A
rain,
(M,)
or
a
/iolent
rain,
consisting
of
large
drops,
(I,
TA,)
wide
in
extent:
so
called because
the clouds
cleave
asunder
from
it:
(M,
IS,
TA:)
pi.
as above.
(TA.)
-
The
p!.,
,,tU,
is
expl.
by
Az
assignifying
Clouds
that
harve
clovern
asnder
rith
cpio~w
rains.
(O,TA.)-_*.iU
',
(0,]5,)and
'e.1;,
both
asexpl.
byAloo-Sa-ced,
(0,)
A
fl,a
of
lightning
that
ihas
~rl (0,
]O)
in
the
izon,
(0,)
or
fron
the
horizon:
(]5:
[but
see
1
i
:]) or
'4
signifies
aJl~
of
ightning
that
has spreadin
the
breadth
of
the
clouds,
and
Jlled
the
shy:
pl.
as
above.
(nam
p.
5.57.).A
head-
ache,
(JK,
T, TA,)
or
a
pain,
(S,
O,
],)
or
a
certaib
disease,
(M,)
in
the
half
of
the
head,
(JK,
T,
,
M,
0,
.K,)
[i.
e.
hemnicrania,]
and
of
the
fce:
(JK,
T,
?,
O,
]:)
or,
accord.
to
IAth,
a
sort
of
headache
in t!e
fore
part
of
the
head
and
towards
the
sides
thereof.
(TA.)
~Q
t.a.LiI.,
Iused
alike
as
sing.
and
pl.,
(9,
0,
K,)
having
noproper
sing.,
(M.b,)
or
its sing.
is
;
;
(M,
O,Msb;)[The
red,
or
blood-colourwe,
anemone;]a
certaindang;
(M;)
a
certainred
jlw,er;
(Lth,
0;)
tet
lknown;
(F,
5;)
thei.;
(Mhb;)
or, as
AHn
says,
on
the authorityof
AA
anilAboo-
Nasr
and
others,
it
is
the
i
n.
un.
of
];
and
the
sing.
of
ki
is
*;
:
(O,
TA:)
it
is
called
l,J;JI
i.fU
because
of
its
redlnetss,
as
being likenedtothe
a1A
of
lightning:
(M,
] :)
or
from
Cl,al
as
meaning"
blood,"
as
resenbling
bloodin
colour;(Msb,
TA;)
so
that
it
signifies
"pieces
of
blood
:"
(TA:)
or
in
relation
to
En-Noomin
Ibn-EI-Mundhir,
bcenusehe
prohlibited
to
thepublica
piece
of
land
in
which
it
abounded:
(9,
K,
TA:)
or
becausc hc
alighted
upon
4.;1
of
sand
that
hadproducedreditS,
and
Ihe
deemed
theni
beautiial, and
commanded
that
theyshould
be
prohibited
to
the
public;
so
the
i.
were calledthe
tUl
of
En-No~mnAn,
by the
name
of
the
place
of
their growth.
(TA.)
Scealso
a ..
j&,
and
with
:
see
i.
,
infour
places.
~1
2,
meaningOne
who
glories,
or
boa~,
vainly,
and
paises
himself
for
that
which
is
not
in
him,
is
not
of
the[classical]language
of
the
Arabs.
(L,
TA.)
Li:
A
horse
with
rrwhich
hi rider
e-
1
1578
 
BOOK
I.]
periencs
difficulty
in
striving
to
masterhim.
(J.);,
A
certain
mode
of
bq,
(p,
TA,)
in
whichthe
romanlies
upon
iher
[or
ide].
(TA.)
il".
[The
bursa
faucium,
or
faucial
bag,
,viicl
iC
placed
behindthe
palate
of
the
he-camed,
and
whicAh,
lren
excited,
he
inflates,
and
blows
out
from
the
side
of
his
mouth;]
a
thing
re-
senbling
the
lungs,
or
lights,
whichthe he-cameld
1rotrnudae
from
his
mouth
when he
is excitedby
lust;
(~,
O,
15;)
a
skin
in
the
fauces
of
the
Arabian
camel,
whichhe
inflates
with
wind,
and
in
vwhich
hebroays;
whereupon
it
appears
from
theside
of
his
mouth;
so
says
En-Nadr;
and
he
adds
that
it
does
not
pertain
to
any
butthe
Arabian
camel,
[as
is said
inthe
M,
and]
as
Hr
says;
but
thisrequires
consideration;
(TA;)
[also
expl.as]
the
;j
[q.
v.]
of
the
he-camel,
(M,and
lar
p.
10,)
which
he
protrudes
rom
his mouth
when
he
brays:(H.ar
ubi
supra:)
pl.
oSUZ.
(TA.)
To
this
is
likened
thetongue
of
the
chaste,
or
eloquent,
and
able
speaker;
himselfbeing
likened
tothe
braying
stallion-camel:
(0:)
and
hence
they
say
of
an
orator,or
apreacher,
tl;at
lie
is
;ii
j
3:
(,R:)
onesayslikewise
of
an
orator,
ora
preacher,
that
is
loud
in
voice
and
skilful
in
speech,
;'i
'I
Z.
A
[lit.
le
is
wide,
or
ample,
in
respect
tf
tius
'a~
]: (TA:)
and
one says,
--
:
s
[meaning
Itis
utterance
wvas
sonormts
andfluent].
(A
and
TA in
art.
j.aI.)
()rators,or
preachers,arealso
termed
LeU:
[for
;i'
j,]:
and
one
says,
;i~
.4i
aL'..,
meaning
t
SucA
a
one
is
the
noble,
and
thechaste
in
speech,
or
eloquent,
of
his)eplte.
(M.)And
in
a
trad.
of
'Omar,(M,
0,
TA,)
accordl.
to
A'Obeydand
others,
or
of
'Alee
accord.to
lir,
(TA,)
Ljt
are
assigned
to theDevil,
in
his
saying,
.
0
LJI
:,
Q,tUa~ll
4.i
[lit.
Verily',any
of
the
orations,or
harangces,
ar
from
the
j:U:
of
the
DerilJ;
because
of
the
lyiagintroducedinto
them.
(M,
O,'
TA.
e
)i ;
l:G
.l1
an
appellation
appliedto
a
certain
.;
[i.
e.
oration,
orharangue,orser-
mon,]
of
'Alee,
becaluse
of
his
sayingto
Ibn-
'Abbais,
(0,
I5,)onhis
havingcut short
his
lpeecll,
(0,)
in
reply
to
aremark
of
the latter
personupon
his
not
amving
continuedhis
speech
uninterruptedly,
UdZ
1k-,i
[That
was
a
;;
that
uttered
a
braying,
then
became
still.
(o, 1.)
3L,
Dfficut,
hard,
distressing,
grieous,
af-
flicting,
troubling,
molsdting,fatiguing,
or
rreay-
ing.
(KL.)
One
says
jl?
j,.
[An
affair,
or
event,
that
is
diffcult,
&c.];
from
j'l!;
j.
(Msb.)And
ai;
aiJ
(;,
M'b)
A
longjourny
[that
is
di~
cult,
&c.].
(Meb.)
OlU
The
*padix
of
a
palm-tree,
that
has
becom
a
spanin
ength;
so
called
because
it
cleaves
theenvelope:
pl.
lj.
(M.)
ij,l,
($,
M,
0,
]g,)
fem.
n;,
nd
pl.
',(1,)
applied
to
a
horse,
WVide
between
the
hind
legs:
(IAar,
Th,T,
O,'
1,'
TA:)
andthe
fem.
signifies
wide
in
the
t1i1
[or
groin,
or
similar
part];
(TA;)
and
is
applied
toa
mare:
(IDrd,
O,
TA:)
and
wide
in
the
vulva;
(IA§r,O,
K1
)
applied
in
this
sense
to
a
woman.
(IAyr,
0,
TA.)And
Lp4o
1.itl
,
applied
to
a
horse,
Wide
in
the
mnorils.
(Lth,
O,
TA.)
-
Also,
(0,K
,)
Tall,
or
long;
(T,$,
M,
O,
;)
applied
to
a
horse;
(T,$,
M,
1;)
thus
expl.by
As;
(T,
TA;)
and
so
too
appliedto
a
man:
(M,
TA
:)
andthe
fem.,
asabove,
applied
to
a
mare.
(.)
-
And,
applied
toa
horse,
That
goestothe
rightand
left
inhis
running,
(JK,
0,
1g,
TA,
[in
the
CK,
;.
iserroneously
put
for
Xt.i.,
andin likemanner
in
my
MS.
copy
of
the
Il,
withthe
additional
mis-
trnscriptionof
*.;o*
for
.
i),])
as
though
(O,
TA)
leaning
upon
one
of
hi
a:ide
(JK,
O,
TA:)
so
ssys
Lth;
andhe
cites
as
an
ex.,[as
thoughmeaning
And
I
moved
my
posterior
in
walking,like
as
goe
thl
horse
that
inclinew
to
the
right
and
left
in
his
running:
but
thismay
be
rendered
and
I
stepped
wide,like
as
does
the
tall,
or
long-bodied,
lurse].
(O,
TA.)
J1
[properly
A
place
of
cleaving,
plitting,
&c.:
and
hence
a
fisure,
cleft,
&.,
like
;:
pl.
&.&
l.
p
see
._
--'lo