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Claremont Courier 6.7.13

Claremont Courier 6.7.13

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Published by Claremont Courier
The Claremont Courier is the community newspaper in Claremont, CA 6.7.13
The Claremont Courier is the community newspaper in Claremont, CA 6.7.13

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Published by: Claremont Courier on Jun 07, 2013
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10/26/2013

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Claremont resident killed after being struck by train/
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Claremont Police Detective Robert Ewing investigates the scene where a pedestrian was killed by a Metrolink train Tuesday adjacent to Indian Hill Boulevard in theClaremont Village. The accident occurred just after 6 a.m. near the pedestrian walkway on the west side of Indian Hill. Michael Rodriguez, 60, of Claremont, was pro-nounced dead at the scene.
LLD
USERTAXINCREASESWITHCOUNCILAPPROVAL
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Friday, June 7, 2013
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One dollar
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our er 
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laremont
 
claremont-courier.com
LETTERS/
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7CALENDAR/
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20More news and photo galleriesevery day at:claremont-courier.comPOLICE BLOTTER/
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4SUMMER OPPS/
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12
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City, residents work to solve speed limit issues/
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 Joslyn launches new focuswith series of talks/
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Butterflies are getting busy at RSABG/
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 7, 2013
2
The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. ClaremontBlvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postageis paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about sub-scriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Tele-phone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier
one hundred and fifth year, number 29
1
420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205BClaremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4761Office hours: Monday-Friday9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Owner
Janis Weinberger
Publisher and Owner
Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com
Editor-in-Chief
Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com
Newsroom
City Reporter
Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com
Education Reporter/Obituaries
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Sports Reporter
Chris Oakley
sports@claremont-courier.com
Photo Editor/Staff Photographer
Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com
Reporter At Large
Pat Yarborough
Calendar Editor
Jenelle Renschcalendar@claremont-courier.com
Back Page
Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com
Production
Ad Design
Jenelle Rensch
Page Layout
Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch
Advertising
Advertising Director
Mary Rose
maryrose@claremont-courier.com
Classified Editor
Jessica Gustin
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Administration
Office Manager/ Legal Notices
Vickie Rosenberg
legalads@claremont-courier.com
Billing/Accounting Manager
Dee Proffitt
Distribution/Publications
Tom Smith
tomsmith@claremont-courier.com
Circulation/Subscriptions
subscriptions@claremont-courier.com
Interns
Open
T
here have been many odd things newspapers havedone over the past several years when addressing thechanges in reader habits, advertising and the bottomline. The most popular approach is to cut their way toprofits, hoping subscribers won’t notice the impact on quality.The result has been significantly smaller staffs to cover thenews. And I have no doubt readers really do see the difference.With all this focus on budget-cutting, none seem as strange aswhen the
Chicago Sun-Times
decided to lay off their entire 25-member photography staff in one fell swoop. The reasoning wasnews reporting is changing, with a greater focus on the Internet.In a statement they said:
The Sun-Times
business is changing rapidly and our audi-ences are consistently seeking more video content with theirnews,” the
Sun-Times
explained. “We have made great progressin meeting this demand and are focused on bolstering our re-porting capabilities with video and other multimedia elements.The
Chicago Sun-Times
continues to evolve with our digitallysavvy customers, and as a result, we have had to restructure theway we manage multimedia, including photography, across thenetwork.”Maybe I have read too many of these company statements,but does anyone really believe this is good for readers? So I havedecided to decode this statement on what it really means, just forCOURIER readers. What they should have said is:“The
Sun-Times
business is changing rapidly and we needto cut costs immediately. Since our website design reallydoesn’t focus on photography, we figure firing our entirephoto staff is a win-win for us. Reporters will now take pic-tures and video on iPhones, in addition to writing. We’re bet-ting readers will look at our video and photography no matterhow bad it is. Our editors say this will hurt our writing, too.But we know we are all just lucky to have jobs.”I’m not against multitasking, but as someone who has per-sonally tried to take videos and pictures on assignment, it’s re-ally difficult. Shooting video is a different way of thinking, andyou are bound to miss the “moment” that makes still images socompelling. I realize shooting both will occur in certain situa-tions, but when you throw in writing a story as well, you’ve gota recipe for disaster. Or, as in the
Sun-Times
case, a drop in qual-ity of all published content…in print and online.This decision is also a result of how the Internet has changedphotojournalism. As our COURIER newspaper readers know,page design is critical in the display of good photography. Edi-tors take time to choose only the best images from a shoot. Dur-ing the page design process, photos are sized differently forgreater emphasis on key images, and then mixed with typogra-phy on the page. It’s a real art to do this well, and takes team-work from photographer, to editor, to designer.With online slideshows, you have no limits on space, whichleads most websites to include so many photos from an eventthat the repetition can be unbearable. When you include every-thing, nothing is really emphasized for impact. The days of get-ting more clicks have replaced the style of photo usage in
 Life
magazine.Don’t get me wrong, I look at online photo slideshows all thetime. But the nature of how photography is displayed onlinedoes impact photojournalism and storytelling.As for management at the
Sun-Times
? They could have justas easily trained part or all of the photo staff to shoot video.Many newspapers already do that. This would not only be a re-lief to the writing staff, but would keep the integrity and qualityof their visuals at a much higher level.Here’s hoping this decision doesn’t start a trend in the news-paper industry.
D
ESIGN
P
RICE
S
ERVICE
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our er i
laremont
 
claremont-courier.com
D
ESIGN
P
RICE
S
ERVICE
909-621-4761
classified@claremont-courier.com
Effective, beautiful websites.
Custom-built and maintained with small businesses in mind.
D
ESIGN
:P
RICE
:
S
ERVICE
:
Take advantage of the COURIER’s outstanding customerservice and work with Jessica in person. She can helpmaintain your website, too. Just call or email anytime.
Here are some of theClaremont businesses whohave worked with us todevelop their websites.
There are dozens of options for building websites. Buthow do they look? Our designs are custom-built for yourbusiness...and they are gorgeous.We understand you have a small marketingbudget. We have unique and proven ways tomaximize your business exposure online.
by Peter Weinberger
Photojournalism impacted as use ofphotography changes
 
Claremont COURIER/Friday, June 7, 2013
3
A
local man was struckand killed by aMetrolink train nearthe intersection of Indian HillBoulevard and First Street onTuesday, June 4. Police re-ceived the call around 6:11a.m. The man, identified as 60-year-old Michael Patrick Ro-driguez of Claremont, wasdeclared dead upon officers’arrival at the scene just mo-ments later.
Mr. Rodriguez was on the west sideof Indian Hill heading south when hewas struck by Metrolink Express Train383 heading toward Union Station onthe south set of tracks, according toClaremont Sergeant Dave De Metz. Noother train was in sight or in the area atthe time of the collision, verifiedMetrolink spokesman Jeff Lustgarten.According to the Metrolink schedule,the 383 Express train is a nearly directtransit from San Bernardino to Los An-geles, stopping only in Rancho Cuca-monga and Covina en route to LA’sUnion Station.There was no indication the incidentwas a suicide, according to an investi-gator with the Los Angeles CountyCoroner. The guardrails were down atthe time of the incident, LieutenantMike Ciszek confirmed. However,while the rails at the intersection whereMr. Rodriguez was struck block traffic,they do not jut out to block the pedes-trian walkway. Ear buds and sunglasseswere recovered at the scene and, ac-cording to police, video surveillance iscurrently being reviewed as part of theinvestigation.Several of Mr. Rodriguez’s friendsand family members were on sceneTuesday morning, but refused comment.Unfortunately, train vs. pedestrian in-cidents are not a rare occurrence forMetrolink officials, acknowledged Mr.Lustgarten. Sometimes a month goesby without incident. At other timesthere are several reported within oneweek.“We had kind of a spate of incidentsa few weeks ago, totally unrelated toone another,” Mr. Lustgarten said. “It just kind of happened. There is norhyme or reason to it.”About 350 passengers were onboardthe westbound train at the time Mr. Ro-driguez was hit. None sustained in- juries from the crash and all weresafely evacuated from the train, accord-ing to Mr. Lustgarten.Despite significant delays followingthe accident, Metrolink officials andClaremont officers were able to reopena second track during the investigation,They also brought in back up trans-portation for help. As of noon on Tues-day, both tracks had been reopened anddelays had been resolved.Family and friends gathered againlate Tuesday to set up a memorial nearthe tracks in remembrance of Mr. Ro-driguez. Flowers, written tributes andvotive candles serve as a tribute to aman friends describe as a hard workerand caring friend.“He was a really quiet and down-to-earth person,” said co-worker JanetAguayo, who worked with Mr. Ro-driguez at the American Red Cross inWhittier for 5 years.Mr. Rodriguez worked as a driver forthe Red Cross, helping to set up blooddrives and transporting the donatedblood. A Red Cross work shirt hangs atthe train track memorial to symbolizehis dedication to the organization. Hewas a selfless worker, reflected PatriciaCabral, another co-worker present withMs. Aguayo.“He loved to work,” Ms. Cabral said.“Never had a bad thing to say aboutanyone. He was never upset and hesmiled a lot.”
—Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont man dies after being struck by train
CITY NEWS
COURIER photos/Steven FelschundneffClaremont Police Detective Robert Ewing investigates the scene where a pedestrian was killed by a Metrolink train Tues-day adjacent to Indian Hill Boulevard in the Claremont Village. The accident occurred just after 6 a.m. near the pedestrianwalkway on the west side of Indian Hill. Michael Rodriguez, 60, of Claremont, was pronounced dead at the scene.Claremont Police Officer Stephanie Vi-enna, right, and Los Angeles CountyCoroner investigator Selena Barros re-move evidence from the scene whereClaremont resident Michael Rodriguezdied on Tuesday in Claremont.American Red Cross technician Janet Aguayo places flowers on a memorial forMichael Rodriguez on Wednesday south of the railroad tracks in the Claremont Vil-lage. Ms. Aguayo and Mr. Rodriguez were colleagues at the American Red Crossin Whittier and she described him as being a “happy, down-to-earth person.”AT RIGHT: Patricia Cabral writes a mes-sage on a union poster left in memory ofMr. Rodriguez.

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