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PAHMA Newsletter (Fall, 2004)

PAHMA Newsletter (Fall, 2004)

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Published by: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology on Apr 25, 2009
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09/22/2011

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N
E
W
S
FALL2004VOLUME 5, NUMBER 1
continued on page 6
PHOEBEA.HEARST
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
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he Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology unveils its holdings from the country of Mexico through the exhibition,
Tesoros Escondidos: Hidden Treasures from theMexican Collections
. The 250 items selected for the exhibition were culled from the museum's perma-nent collection and chosen especially for their craftsmanship, rarity, age, and sheer beauty. With fewexceptions, these artifacts have never before been publicly exhibited.
Tesoros Escondidos: HiddenTreasures from the Mexican Collections
opens to the public on Mexican Independence Day,September 16. New selections will be added to the presentation throughout the year until the exhibitcloses on June 26, 2005.
While not previously seen by the public, the museum's Mexican collections have long been a significantresource for international scholars. According to Dr. Marion Oettinger, Jr., senior curator and curatorof Latin American art at the San Antonio Museum of Art, "The Hearst Museum has a great tradi-tion of placing high value on Latin American folk art, especially materials from Mexico."Oettinger, known for his work with the Nelson Rockefeller collection of Mexican folk art, isone of the speakers for the museum's spring 2005 lecture series about Mexican art and culture.
Tesoros Escondidos
offers Bay Area audiences a wonderful opportunity to consider Mexico'sculture from an historical perspective. Phoebe Apperson Hearst was interested in the anthro-pology of Mexico, and was encouraged by ethnohistorian Zelia Nuttall to initiate the muse-um's Mexican collection in the early 1900s. Among the many textiles and other objectsacquired by Nuttall in the early 20th century, she collected several Saltillo sarapes, whichform the world's largest, oldest, and best-documented collection of this type outside thepurview of private collections. Saltillo sarapes were made in Northern Mexico during themid-1800s and are especially prized for their bright colors and fine weaving designs.Since Nuttall's day, the Hearst Museum's Mexican collections have grown to more than 3,000 ethno-graphic objects and several thousand archaeological specimens. These items were very often collecteddirectly from the makers by field anthropologists and are accompanied by extensive field notes. The rangeof objects represents Mexico's diversity, including indigenous groups, the
Mestizo
population, and theHispanic elite.
T
CARVED GOURD BOWL (
JICARA
)
 
FROM THE DIRECTOR
B
ACKTOTHE
UTUREATTHE
"P
HOEBE
"
LOCATION
The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is located in KroeberHall on the corner of Bancroft Way and College Avenue on the UCBerkeley Campus.
HOURS/ADMISSION
The museum is open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.Wednesday throughSaturday and noon to 4:00 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $4 for adults,$3 for seniors, $1 for students age 13 and above; free admission tomuseum members, UCB students, faculty, staff, children 12 and under;free to all on Thursdays. The museum is wheelchair accessible.
TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING
Campus is served by the following AC Transit bus routes: 7, 40, 51,52, 64. The museum is a 15-minute walk east from the Berkeley BARTstation. Metered parking is available on streets near themuseum. Paid public parking is available at Berkeley Public Parking,2420 Durant Avenue (west of Telegraph), and after 5 p.m. and onweekends in the parking structure adjacent to the museum.
PHOEBE A. HEARST
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
Douglas Sharon, Director Margaret R. Pico, Newsletter Editor Contributors: Cynthia Clearwater, Harriet Goldman, Joan Knudsen, Ira Jacknis, Nicole Mullen, Otis Parrish,Carol Redmount, Douglas SharonThØrŁse Babineau, Photographer M.R. Kimmins, DesignThe newsletter is published twice yearly.Copyright ' UC Regentshttp://hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu
ocio-cultural anthropologistsare familiar with the philosoph-ical concept that continuity andchange are two sides of the samecoin. In a very real sense this old ideacan be seen as sub-text for the
Diversity
 — 
Cultural Arts
 — 
Antiquities
initiative we are currently implement-ing at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology.Two projects
one old, one new
illustrate what I mean.On June 30th
after five years of yeoman's labor by alegion of volunteers coordinated by our dedicated collec-tions managers
the museum's world-class basket and tex-tile collections were stabilized and re-housed in a state-of-the-art conservation facility in a University building on SanPablo Avenue. Special thanks go to all the public-spiritedpeople who made it happen. Upon completion, we wentinto high gear on the installation of 
Tesoros Escondidos:Hidden Treasures from the Mexican Collections
, thisadministration's first rotating exhibition drawn entirelyfrom the PAHMA collections as assembled by our newlyformed exhibit team. The conservation/re-housing projectwas funded by grants from the National Endowment forthe Humanities, the National Science Foundation, theNational Endowment for the Arts, and an endowmentfrom the William Randolph Hearst Foundation.
TesorosEscondidos
is the first of a three-year program of articulat-ed exhibit and educational outreach efforts also funded bythe Hearst Foundation. It is part of the
Diversity
Cultural Arts
 — 
Antiquities
initiative which is geared to"getting in the public eye" by revealing the "hidden treas-ures" of the museum.An important part of "going public"
which is whatPhoebe Hearst had in mind when she underwrote anddonated the core collections for what she hoped wouldbecome a "great educator…giving the people of Californiaevery educational advantage"
is to build a membershipbase of loyal supporters. In this regard, in the spring of this year we inaugurated our Circle of Friends, a newdonor group to complement our Members and Associates.The initial response to the Circle of Friends has been veryencouraging. We are grateful to those who have joined usat this level and hope that you and your friends will helpincrease their numbers.In closing, I would like to say that I feel privileged andhonored to have become part of what I know will becomeBerkeley's "people place." I look forward to seeing youthis fall.Sincerely,Douglas Sharon, Ph.D.Director
S
2
 
Education Department Announces New Program Series
B
Y
H
ARRIET
G
OLDMAN
, C
OORDINATOROF
M
USEUM
E
DUCATION
e are pleased to announce that several new ini-tiatives are planned for 2004-2005 as well asthe expansion of prior ones. These public pro-grams are made possible by a generous grant from theWilliam Randolph Hearst Foundation.
O
UTREACHAND
P
ROGRAMS
Monthly lunchtime gallery talks will continue this year;the first semester's series will focus on Mexican culturalarts in conjunction with the
Tesoros Escondidos
exhibi-tion. Please refer to the list of events on page five of thisissue for more information.This past June, children and their families enjoyed aninteractive family day,
The World in My Neighborhood 
,which included West African drumming, classical Indiandance, and a sand-painting workshop. This year, the muse-um will host two family days with performances andhands-on introductions to cultural arts in both the fall andspring. The October family day will focus on traditionalMexican arts and will include folk music and dances of Mexico, a puppet show, and
 papel picado
(paper-cuts)demonstrations.Our newest family programming initiative premiered on July 11,
Cultural Arts and Activities
, a monthly drop-inseries of programs introducing children and families to tra-ditional arts and stories from around the world. Each pro-gram highlights elements of a particular culture throughperformances or hands-on demonstrations and work-shopswith traditional artists.
T
EACHING
K
ITS
After extensive research, education specialist NicoleMullen completed the comprehensive teaching kit,
YorubaArt and Culture
, which has been well-received in theschools. She is currently completing the kit,
Mexican FolkArt,
which will be ready for the opening of the
TesorosEscondidos
exhibit.An exciting collaboration occurred this year with theInstitute of East Asian Studies and ORIAS, the outreacharm of the University'sInstitute of Internationaland Area Studies. EastAsian Studies has provideda grant to complete data-base entry of the museum'sFang Collection of ChineseFolk Arts and also for theeducation specialist todevelop a teaching kit onChinese popular culture.Additional funds have beenprovided for a graduatestudent to assist in the cre-ation of the kit and todevelop supplementarymaterials for the ORIAS website, which serves K-12 teach-ers nationally.
T
ESOROS
E
SCONDIDOS
E
XHIBIT
There will be two new features in the gallery this fall. Theintroductory and panel text will be available in bothSpanish and English. We will also provide supplementarygallery materials for the exhibit to enhance the visitorexperience. Various topics will include: chocolate, textiles,early Mexican history, and the famous Mexican holiday
Dia de los Muertos
(Day of the Dead). Furthermore, therewill be a special activity sheet available for children.
D
OCENTS
As we enhance the visitor experience at the museum, weare seeking qualified volunteers to act as docents, provid-ing exhibit tours for both K-12 and adult audiences.Training includes discussions with curators, individualresearch, and assigned readings on subjects pertaining tothe exhibits. A serious commitment to the educationalgoals of the museum is required. Participants can gaindocent skills while learning about the museum's collectionsin this exciting program. Academic or life experience per-taining to anthropology and material culture is beneficial,but not necessary. Enthusiasm and strong communicationskills are desirable. For further information please contactthe Education Department at 510-643-7649 or emailhgoldman@berkeley.edu.
 
W
SWETHA DIXIT AND DAUGHTERBEADED YORUBA TWIN FIGURE
3

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