Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
"The Heimlich Manuever [sic]," a two-part Public Health Statement by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, December 11+27, 1985 (note "manuever" misspelling throughout)

"The Heimlich Manuever [sic]," a two-part Public Health Statement by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, December 11+27, 1985 (note "manuever" misspelling throughout)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4 |Likes:
Published by Peter M. Heimlich
"The Heimlich Manuever [sic]," a two-part Public Health Statement by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, December 11+27, 1985 (note "manuever" misspelling throughout)
"The Heimlich Manuever [sic]," a two-part Public Health Statement by Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, December 11+27, 1985 (note "manuever" misspelling throughout)

More info:

Published by: Peter M. Heimlich on Jun 08, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/09/2013

pdf

text

original

 
December
11,1985
I
US
ocoa~lrnent
ei
Hcann
and
nman
>avres
~ljtirlc
HrZ'lh
Scrvae
I
The
Heimlich
Manuever
(Part
oneof
two
parts)
More than
3,000
people
die
fromchoking
in
the
United
States each
year.
lMost choking
in
adults occurs whikthey are eating. Meat is the usual cul-prit. Other foods
and
objects causechoking, too.especially in young chil-dren who,
as
all
parents know,
seem
todelight in putting all
sorts
of
things intotheir mouths.For
years
medical opinion
differed
onthe best
way,
or ways,
of
dislodging
an
object
from the throat
of
a choking
vic-
tim.
Sharp blows to
the
back,
fingersweeps of the throat
and
manual
thrusts
to
the chest
were
methods
often
recom-
mended.
Today,
there
is
universal
agree-
ment that these methods
can
be
danger-
ous and should
not
be
performed.
A
back
slap
or
a
probing
finger,
for
in-
stance,
can
drive the foreign
object
wen
deeper
into
the
throat.
The
best
rescue
technique in
any
choking situation, doc-tors now
agree,
is
the
Heimlich
Manue-
ver,
which
I
shall describe
briefly
in
to-
day's article
and
in
more detail
next
month.
The
Heimlich Manuever is
safe,
ef-fective and easily
mastered
by the
avw-
age
person. Basically, it require therescuer to press sharply and repeatedly
on
the
victim's
abdomen, just
above
the naveI, thereby forcing
air
from
the
lungs
up the airway with
such
forcethat
it
dislodges the obstruction.
The
Manuever
can
be
performed on stand-
ing
or seated victims
and
on persons
who
have fallen to
the
floor.
It
can
be
performed on children. Before resort-
ing
to
the
Manuever, however,
the
firstthing
the
would-be rescuer must do, tothe
best
of
his
or
her ability, is to make
sure
that the victimactually
is
chokingand
not
suffering from another condi-tion,
such
as a
heart attack.
Look
far
the sign
of
choking that
many
victims give instinctively by
u.
bringing
their
hands to
their
throatswith
thumbs
and
fingers
spread
wide.
Ask
the victim,
"Are
you
choki
Even
if
he
cannot answer, he ma
able
to
nod affirmatively.
mE
Sometimes,
the
airway will
be
only
partially blocked, allowing the
YcmSHIE
to
cough
and
to
breathe to
some
ex-
tent. In most cases, the
victim
wilI
be
able
to
expel
the foreign body
without
the
assistance of another person.
If
spontaneous expulsion does not
soon
occur, however-if breathing
becomes
more difficult
and
the victim's distressincreases-the Heimlich Manuevershould be started, before the complica-tions of prolonged, inadequate ventila-tion or complete blockage of
the
air-
way
can occur.If the
victim
does not
give
the chokingsign,
look
for three more signs that
will
indicate
complete
obstruction of
the
air-
way:
first,
an
inability to breathe, cough
or
speak;
second, pale skin color that
is
beginning to turn bluish,
and;
third,
loss
of
consciousness.
The
Heimlich
Manue-
ver should
be
started
at the
first
sight
of
any
of
these signs.
A
more
difficult
situationis pre-sented
when
someone
is
found
uncon-
scious and not breathing and no
one
saw
a
choking attack
take
place.
If
thevictim
is
young (under
30)
or
a
child,and
if
he
is
in the vicinity of
a
restau-
rant-for instance, in the restroom
or
hallway
leading
to it-the rescuershould assume that
choking
has
taken
place
and
should
begin the HeimlichManuever immediately.
If
the situationdoes
not
suggest choking, thevictim
must
be
treated
as
a
heart
attack victim
and
CPR
should
be
initiated.
If
there is
an
obstruction
in
the airway
after
all,
the rescuer will realize it at once when
he
is
unable
to
breathe for
the
victim.
The rescuer
should
immediately initiatethe Heimlich
Manuever
to
clear
the
blacked air passage.Next month:
How
To Perform the
Heimlich
Manuever.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->