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Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 5 - page 101 to 200

Edward William Lane's lexicon - Volume 5 - page 101 to 200

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Published by Silky Beaver
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.
Important Note: You shall not use any meanings without reading the complete information available in the lexicon by self.

Edward William Lane was a British Orientalist, translator and lexicographer (September 17, 1801, Hereford - August 10, 1876, Worthing).

From 1842 onwards, Lane devoted himself to the monumental Arabic-English Lexicon, although he found time to contribute several articles to the journal of Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft.[1]

Lane's Selections from the Quran appeared in 1843. It was neither a critical nor a commercial success. Moreover, it was misprint-ridden, as Lane was for the third time in Egypt, along with his wife, sister and two nephews, to collect materials for the planned dictionary, the Arabic-English Lexicon, when it was being printed.[2]

Lane was unable to complete the dictionary. He had arrived at the letter Qāf, the 21st letter of the Arabic alphabet, when he died in 1876. Lane's great-nephew Stanley Lane-Poole finished the work based on his incomplete notes and published it in the twenty years following his death.[3]

In 1854, an anonymous work entitled The Genesis of the Earth and of Man was published, edited by Lane's nephew Reginald Stuart Poole. The work is attributed by some to Lane.[4]

The part concerning Cairo's early history and topography in Description of Egypt, based on Al-Maqrizi's work and Lane's own observations, was revised by Reginald Stuart Poole in 1847 and published in 1896 as Cairo Fifty Years Ago.[5] The whole Description of Egypt was published by the American University in Cairo Press in 2000.[6]

Lane died on 10 August 1876 and was buried at West Norwood Cemetery. To read more about the author, visit :

http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/200802/the.indefatigable.mr.lane.htm

[1] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[2] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Pages 106-7
[3] Oriental Essays by A.J. Arberry, Page 115
[4] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 249
[5] Roper, Geoffrey (1998). "Texts from Nineteenth-Century Egypt: The Role of E. W. Lane", in Travellers in Egypt by Paul Starkey (Editor), Janet Starkey , Page 245
[6] Thompson, Jason. "An Account of the Journeys and Writings of the Indefatigable Mr. Lane". Saudi Aramco World. Retrieved 2008-06-22

Preface part Lane's Lexicon: "In the year 1842, a most generous offer made to me by the present Duke of Northumberland (then Lord Prudhoe*) enabled me to undertake the composition of this work; His Grace's princely aid I have ever since been mainly indebted for the means of accomplashing the project thus originated."

*Admiral Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland KG PC FRS (15 December 1792 – 12 February 1865), styled Lord Algernon Percy until 1816 and known as The Lord Prudhoe between 1816 and 1847, was a British naval commander, explorer and Conservative Party (UK) politician.

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Published by: Silky Beaver on Jun 08, 2013
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1810
be
a
mistake
for
bi,
ut
see
what
follows,])
Doubt
(AA,
O,
)
in
the
Ahet:
(I
c)
the
first
is
more common
than
the
second,
In
this
sense;
and
occurs in the
~lur
in
svi,
last
verseandxxvii.
72t
(O:)
[but] Ibn-Ketheer
read,
in both
of
these
instances,
Vt
j
;
and this
and
jo
are dial.
vars.
signifying
straitness
of
mind.
(Bd.)
_See
also
~j,
in
two
places
:_and
air,
second sentence,in two
places.
ib:
see
the
next
preceding
paragraph,
in
fiveplaces.
-i-:
ee
i..,
latter part.
i..L.:
see
J:
h,
latter
part.-Also
($)
:
Poerty;
and
an
evil
state
or
condition;
(S,
O,
1,
TA;)
and
so
*
aib:
(g,
TA:)
and
the pl.
[or
rather
coil.
gen.
n.]
(Fr,
$,
1,
TA)
of
the
former
(Fr,
$,
TA)
is
( :
(Fr, ?,
V,TA:
[in
the
CV,
erroneously,
gp
:])
Fr
says,when
you
see
jii
to
have
occurred
in
the
place
of
;jJl,
t
is
in[one
of]
two
cases;
either
it
is
the
pi. '[or
coll.
gen.
n.]
of
a4i.l;
or
it
means
the
narrow,
or
strait,
thing,
,
being
a
contraction
of
hj..
(TA.)_And
i1l
,
(0,)
or
[withoutthe
article],
(JK,
0,
TA,)
or
V
---,
(]g,
[app.
a
mistake,
for
in
the
0,
in
every
case,
whether
as
a
proper
name
or not,
IJ4.II
is
written
1dj,])
is
the
name
of
A
certain
manion
of
hemoon,
(JK,
0,
],
TA,)
[not
one
of
the Twenty-eightMansions,]
cloa
by
QJ1
[or
the
Pleiades]:
(JK,
0,
TA:)
or,
as
Ilgt
says,
on
the
authority
of
Ibn-ZiyMd
El-Kilibee,
sometimes
the
moonfalls
short
of
---
II
and
alights
in
ir1I,
i.e.
two
small
start,
ear
together,
between
JI
and
j.M
1:
(TA:)
it
is
asserted by the
Arabs to
be
an
inauspicious
plaoe.
(0,0
TA.)
Hence
the
saying
of
El-Akhtal,
0
Cm
aa.y
[And
wherefore
didst
not
thou
dram
an
omen
f,rin
the
ight
of
birds
on the
night
hen
thou
camnstto
her,
when
the
moon
was
in
4peyah,
betmen
the
Pbiade
and
Ed-Debardn?]:
he
notifies
that
the moon,
in
the night
of
theircomingtogether,
was
making
its
abode
[in
the
neighbourhood
of]
JlI,oll,
which is
inauspicious:
(O,TA:)
or [the
latter
hemistich,as
J
relates
it,
app.
on
the authority
of
A'Obeyd,
is
thus,]
from
11~t
as
syn.
·
ith
X
ll;
(1;;)
and
as
from
a&,WI
as
syn. with
J~I;
(s;)
and
as
AA
relates
the verse,
it
is
[thus]
with
kesrtothe
i
inA~E.;the
word
not
being
made
the[proper]
name
of
a
place,
but
the meaning
being
Jlj..
I
.1
.l
I~;
[ti.; .
in
the narrow
space betweethe
Pleiade
and Ed-Debardn].
(TA.).
ti-
is
also
the
fem.
of
s,r
the
con-
tracted
form
of
t.
(~,
O,
TA.)
&*.b:
see
thenext
preceding
paragraph,
former
half, in
two places.
J,3
.Bd
L)
arefems.
oft
;
(,
O,
/
;)
the
former [aswell
as
thelatter]
is
[originally]
of
the
measure
uLa,
(TA,)
[eachbeing
originally
Uib,]
the
Uj
being changed
in
the former
into
j
becauso
quiescent
and
prc-cededby
dammeh:
($,
0,
TA:)
the formeroccurs in
the saying
of
a
woman
to
her
fellow-
wife,
contendingwith her
for
superiority,
[Thou
art
not
the
better
nor
the
narrower
&c.;
,;,-
being
in
like
manner
fem.
of
,
A.].
A.)
Accord.to
Kr,
the
former is pl.
of
t
;
'
(TA
;
and
he says
the
same
of
14
also;
(TA
voce
a
)
but
ISd
says,
I
know
not
how
thismay
be, for
"L
is
not
of
the measures
of
pls.
except
of
the
kind
of
pl.
which
differs
not
from
itssing.
otherwise than in the
latter's having
;
[as
an
affix],
like
iSL
and
~
[q.
v.].
(TA
in
the
present
art.)
3t1:
see
1
J90L:
see
the
next
paragraph,
in four
places.
,
t
nd
t
(
0,
,)
the
lattera
con-
traction
of
the former,
(J,)
the two
being
like
&
and
.t
[&c.],
(0,)
and
Vt
~L,
(v,)
Narrow,
or
strait:
(S,
O,'0
g:)
or
Lj.
is
an
epithet usedin
this
sense
whenpermanence
[of
the
attribute]
is
meant [and
so
therefore
is
its
contracted
form];
and
t
VL1.
as
meaning
[being,
or
becoming,
nartro
or
strait;
or]
tem-
porarily
narrom
or
strait:
(Mqb:)
the
fem.
of
the
first
(TA)
and
of
the
second
($, O,
TA)
[aswell
as
of
the
third]
is
with
3:
($,
O,
TA:)
see
also
' :
[the
pl.
of
the
firstand
second,
apphed
to
rational
beings,
is
C~
and
,j,
like
b.
and
b,::
and]
the pl.
oft
L
is
iiL..
(TA.)
Yousay
o.
:
(0,
Mab) and
t
j. (0)
A
narrowy,
or
strait,
thing.
(0,'
Myb.)
And
Jl
+'..
t
A
strait,
or
contracted,
mind;
(M9b;) and
v4
[meaning
the
same].
(TA.) And
jJ,
t
t
j;,
in
the
lur
[xi.
15],
means
t
And
thy
mind
is
tem-
porarily
trait
or
contracted
ther~by.
(M
9
b.)
i
i
ignifies
also
t
Niggardly,
or
avaricious.
(KL.)
[And
LJt
J
t
Narro,w,
or
iliberal,indis
.]1tj
[More,
and
most, narrto
or
strait
or
contracted]:
(f,
0,
V:)
see
its
fems.
uJyb
and
oic.,
above.[See also
three
exs.
voce
,~1,
in
art.
&Z..]
u..
A
narrow,
or
strait,
place:
(]:)
[a
pas:
a
place
of
narrownass
or
sraitneu]
of
land;
and
of
the
vulva;
and
t
[a
place,
or
state,
of
straitns]
of
life,
or
of
the
means
of
subsistence:
(lg
in
art..jl
:)
and
$
a
narrow,
or
strait, affair
or
cas:
(V,
TA:)
pl.
S
L;.
(TA.)
.fx
t
[An
ffair
rndred
trait].
(TA.)
[BOOK
I.
j
..
,,
(JK,
and
0
on
the
authority
of Ibn-'Abbad;
and
TA,)
or
t
1Sl,
like
.;b
[inmeasure], thusin
all
the
copies
of
the
], (TA,)
[but
probably,
I
think,taken
from
a
mistran-
scription,]
A
pemary
(4.
;)
of
rag
and
perfume,
with
vwhich
a
wroman
endeatrours to
constrict
her
vagina
(L,
"j.3:).
(JK,
Ibn-'Abbid,
0,
g.)
4.
W.bil
zi;
and
.Jl.;
The
land
had
in
it
[trees
of
the
species
called]
JL:
(Fr,
9,
0 :)
or
Xtijl
Jltb
and
0;
the
place
gave
growth
to
JL.:
(AIIn,
M,
1:)
or
had in
it
many
JLb.
(IK.tt,
TA.)
j,6
The
wild
[specie~
of
lote-tree
caUlled]
[q.
v.]:
(S,
O,
K:)
or
such
of
the
j.
as
are
watered
only
by/
the
rain;
(M,
:)
the
vj.
of
the
mountains,
which
is
thinner
in
its
wood
than
that
of
the
rivers:
AHn
says,
it
grows
in
theplain,
or
soft,
tracts,
and
in
the
rugged;
and
the
bow
that
is made
of
it,
when
it
is
pared,
is
pared
so
as
to
be
thick,
in
order
that
it
may
be
stronger,
because
of
the
lightness
of
its
wood:
(M:)
n. un.with
;.'
(8,
M,
0,
V.)
[See also
A
.a
andW..
]-Also
Another
~ecs
of
tree;
(M,
:;)
A1n
says,
it
is
a
tree
of
the
shrub-kind,
ou~d
in
the
borders
of
El-Yemen,
rising
to
the
height
of
a
cubit,
in
its
manner
of gro~th
like the
cypre~,
and
having
a
yellow
[fruit
of
the
sort
called
a]
a;,
of
a
tvry
pungent
odour,
so
that
its odour
comes
to
you
before
you
reach
it:
it
is not
of
tha
thus
caled.
(M.)
aJiL
n.
un.
of
Jj
[q.
v.].
(S,
M,
O, .)_
Also
Arrows,(M, O,
TA,)
and
bows,
(TA,)
made
of
the
[species
of
lote-tree called]
JG:
(M,
TA:)
this
isthe
primary signification:
(TA:)
or
arrows,
(IB,
g,)
because
theyare
made
thereof:
(IB:)
or
it
signifies,(1I,)
or
signifies
also,
(O,)
all
kinds
of
weapons.
(O,
g.)
One
says,
J
1
~
,
og,
says,
aiLabJw
Lr?
;dJj
[I
saw
himn
shooting
arrows].
(TA.)
And
XLb
&
;b
i.e
[He
wvent
forth
having
in
his
hand]
a
bow.
(TA.)
And 2Ij.
JI
d
'
1
Verily
he
i
com-
21ete
in
respect
of
wcapons.
(O.)
And
Cjz
·
C
'ij
Such
a
one
went
Jfrti
mith
his
meapons.
(O.)
1.
.LI,
(S,
M,b,)
aor.
, ($,)
inf.
n.
.,e,
(S,.
M4b,)
[as also
ao.,
r.
_.,
inf.
n..;.,
(see
art.
.,j,)]
He
wronged
him;treated
him
wrongfuly,
unjustly,
injuriouly,
or
tyrannically:
(S:)
he
harmed,
injured,
hurt,
or
damaged,
him:
(Mqb:)and
t
V:
signifies
the
same.
(S.)
And
Z~
Z,
(M,
g,)
aor.
as
above,
(K,)
and
so
the
inf.
n.,
(M,)
He
deo.
frauded
h'im
of
his
right,
or
due,
partially
or
wholly;
(M,
V;)
as
also
t &,".
(g.)-
..
 
BOOK
I.]
And
I
wa
vronged,
&c.:
of
which
there
are
threedial.
vars.;
onesays
of
a
man
',;
and
.es,
with[thepronunciation
termed]L.l,l;
and
..;
likeas
we
havesaid
respecting
~.
(
O.)
ne
says,
',
L.I;
.
 _
i.
[I
have
notwronged
any
one,
and
Ihave
not
been
wronged];
i.
e.
noone
has
wrongedme.
(TA.)
It
is
saidin
a trad.,
as
some
relate
it,
4
ji
[or
*t
X,t;"
or
t
X
'3x
YZ
,il
not
be
wronged
in
the
seeing
IHim].
(M.
[For
otherreadingsandexplanations
of
this
trad.,
see
3
in
art.
>.])
~.b
S
and
6:
see
the
preceding
paragraph.
10:
see
1,
in
two
places.
.b
Wrong;
i.e.
wrongdoing;
or
rronoful,
unjust,
injurious,
or
tyrannical,
treatment:
(S,
A)an'inf.
n. which
is
pluralized;
its
pl.being
~~.
(M,
)
,.
The
side
of
a
mountain,
(8,
M,
],)
and
of
an
[eminence
such
as
is
termed]
4,.
(M.)
,L51
Wrnging,
or
a
rongdoer:
pl.
1,:
the
latter
occurringin
the
prov.,
i~Lt
4&M.U.t
..
,~l
c.,~
[The
wrongdoers
bring
thee,
or
cause
1817
theeto
comn,
to the
covert
of
the
lion];
meaning,thewrong
of
thewrongdoersrequires
theetocast
thyself
into
destruction:
appliedin
offering
an
excusefor
venturing
upon
that
whichisperilous:or,
as
some
relate
it,
.Lll,
fromeml;
meaning"want,
orthe
object
of
want,
that
bringstheeand
causes
theeto
have
recourse
[to
athing]."(Meyd.)
..
Wronged;treated
wron
y,
unjutly,
injuriously,
or
tyrannically:
as
also
:t~.
(S,
1,'
TA.)
.~
:~;..:
see
what
next
precedes.

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