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FEMICIDE THE STRATEGIC ROLE OF NGO IN MAKING STATES RESPONSIBLES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF DUE DILIGENCE OBLIGATION

FEMICIDE THE STRATEGIC ROLE OF NGO IN MAKING STATES RESPONSIBLES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF DUE DILIGENCE OBLIGATION

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Published by Barbara Spinelli
Report of the event "FEMICIDE
THE STRATEGIC ROLE OF NGO
IN MAKING STATES RESPONSIBLES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF DUE DILIGENCE OBLIGATION"
Report of the event "FEMICIDE
THE STRATEGIC ROLE OF NGO
IN MAKING STATES RESPONSIBLES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF DUE DILIGENCE OBLIGATION"

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Categories:Types, Speeches
Published by: Barbara Spinelli on Jun 10, 2013
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06/10/2013

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Sponsor
IADL – International Association ofDemocratic Lawyers
Co-sponsor
WUNRN - Women's UN ReportNetworkFemmes SolidairesInternational Free Women'sFoundationItalian Cedaw Platform “Lavori incorsa”Antiviolence Center  
UN HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL - SESSION 23
FEMICIDE
THE STRATEGIC ROLE OF NGO
IN MAKING STATES RESPONSIBLES FORTHE IMPLEMENTATION OF DUEDILIGENCE OBLIGATION
 June 05, 2013 4.00 6.00 P.M.
Palais des Nations - Room VIII
 
Geneva, Switzerland
INTRODUCTION – BARBARA SPINELLI
Good afternoon and welcome to everyone to this event, organized byInternational Association of Democratic Lawyers.I am Barbara Spinelli, expert of femicide, and I am member of theIADL (International Association of Democratic Lawyers) and of theItalian Cedaw Platform Lavori in corsa”.I want to thank all my colleagues of the co-sponsor association, thatmake possible the realization of this event, and particularly MicòlSavia and Lois for their invaluable logistic and organizational support,as well as I want to thank all the distinguished speakers of today’sevent.We strongly wished to organize this event on the occasion of theannual discussion on women’s rights.We want to highlight how important it is to consider the progress madein recognizing femicide as a violation of human rights, thanks tofeminists and women’s rights activists work, starting from grassrootsmovements.All over the world, women face discriminations and violences becausethey are women. All over the world, States underestimate their duediligence obligation to adequately prevent and persecute violenceagainst women, and adequately protect and procurate redress towomen survivor of violence.
 
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 We know that a lot of States do not have an adequate legal framework on violence againstwomen.We know also that where States adopted a formal framework on violence against women, inmost cases protection is not effective in practice.As it was stated today during the general debate, we have an international framework onviolence against women, we know what are the standards, and we only need to work onadequate implementation of the due diligence obligation, and for the justiceability of theviolation of these obligations by States. Today here we want to remark how much have been - and still is- strategic the work of women non governative organizations in fighting femicide worldwide, and how important istheir struggle to make States aware of violations of the due diligence obligations on violenceagainst women and of the deficiency of their activities for the elimination of violence againstwomen.All over the word, women everyday fight for gender justice.Feminist organizations contributed worldwide to the affirmation of the State responsibility toact with due diligence for the protection of women survivors of gender violence in order toprevent femicide. The Cotton Fieldjudgement, the condemnation of the Mexican State by Interamerican Courtof Human Rights, would have not been possible without the strong engagement of thefeminist Mexican movement and their partnership with NGOs working on human rightsinternationally.We can say the same for femicide in Austria. Civil society women’s organizations started theCEDAW communication procedures n.5 and 6 of 2005. The Cedaw Committe argued thatAustria had violated the rights of Sahide and Fatma under Art 1,2,3 and 5 CEDAW, becauseaustrian authorities had not taken all appropriate measures to protect their lives. TheCommittee emphasized that is not enough to have good laws, as the laws have to beenforced by all actors. The Special Rapporteur on violence against women, in her 2012 annual report on gendermotivated killings of women, recognized that the formulation of right-based claims by womenremain an important strategic and political tool for women’s empowerment and for addressinghuman rights violations. (A/HRC/20/16, para 104, P.26).All over the world women are agent of change: women working in the frontline help states toidentify weaknesses in prevention of violence and protection of the survivors; women act tostrengthen the institutional response to violence.In the 2013 agreed conclusions, the Commission on the Status of Women urgedGovernments to invite civil society, including non-governmental organizations, to be part of the implementation of the recommended action.
 
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 One of our main challenges for the future is the promotion of a strong and continuativedialogue between Institutions and women’s NGOsStates’ cooperation with women’s organizations is an unique tool in order to create synergiesand make possible to use of all available resources to design implement, and evaluateprograms to end femicide. Today we want to show how cooperation with civil society must became a reality to identifygaps and and jointly create a functioning system to eliminate violence against women and totransform our democracy in gender democracy.When cooperation is not possible, is only thank to the support of women’s NGOs that womensurvivors of violence can claim their rights, expose how they were revictimized by theinadequate action of State’ authorities, and call the State to exercise due diligence to preventand to respond to violence against women of private actors.In this panel, we want to give the floor to the protagonist of this fight, showing how the actionof women from different countries enable a significant change in the regional (European) andnational institutional approaches to femicide.
MS. GWENDOLINE LEFEBVRE - Femmes Solidaires
Ladies and Gentlemen,First of all Femmes solidaires would like to thank the people who organize this panel. This isimportant to multiply the opportunities to speak about feminicide so that this phenomenon isknown and recognized everywhere, by the States and the international institutions. That iswhy we are proud to take part in this event as we did in France at the Parliament in 2011 andearlier this year, here in Geneva, with the International Free Women’s Foundation, to expressour solidarity but above all our indignation and our refusal to accept that violence and crimesare perpetuated against women only because they are women.Femmes solidaires is a feminist movement, recognized in France as part of the movement forPopular Education ; we have a consultative status with the ECOSOC. Our NGO defendssince 1945 the fundamental values of secularism, gender diversity, equality for women’srights, peace and freedom.With a network of 190 organizations in France, Femmes solidaires works to reduce all formsof discrimination and domination, to further equality and women’s rights in all the areas of society, to fight against all forms of violence against women.Our NGO is open to all women, in their diversity, enabling them to become actors of theirlives and to have the courage to speak during initiatives or events. Femmes solidaires workswith women's organisations from different countries to defend their rights and their freedom. Itis active in numerous international campaigns and has developed “reciprocal solidarity”.In France and around the world, women's rights remain unequal. Femmes solidaires claimsthat there are two ways of considering the future of women on our planet. One way consistsin thinking that each woman has what she deserves based on where she was born, herculture, the history of her country and her origins. The other way aspires to promote livingtogether and an alignment of women's rights towards the highest level. This collectiveimpulse is incarnate in one concept: the universality of women's rights. Femmes solidaires

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