Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Army Aviation Digest - May 1991

Army Aviation Digest - May 1991

Ratings:
(0)
|Views: 20|Likes:
Army
Army

More info:

Published by: Aviation/Space History Library on Jun 10, 2013
Copyright:Public Domain

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/28/2014

pdf

text

original

 
.~.
f
Professional Bulletin 1-
91
-3
Distribution restriction:This publication approvedforpublic release. Distribution
is
unlimited.
 
Major General Rudolph Ostovich III
Chief, Army Aviation Branch
1991:
A
Year
for
the
Record
Books
T
HE
YEAR
1991
will be one for the record books:Operation Just Cause; Operations Desert Shield andDesert Storm; new doctrine and equipment; the re-emergence
of
the Armed Forces as one
of
the most respectedinstitutions
of
our Nation; and the continued collapse
of
our Cold War adversaries. The 1990s will be a period
of
change for our Army, so I believe it important to discussone
of
the central themes
of
this decade-modernization.Modernized weapons-and their use
by
intelligent,aggressive, and well-trained soldiers-were key to victory
in
Just Cause and Desert Storm. In Just Cause,modernization enabled
us
to decapitate the PanamanianDefense Forces (PDF)
in
the middle
of
the night andwithin hours. Uncoordinated and cut
off
by
lightningquick, NVG-equipped air assaults and precision-guidedmunitions,most PDF units surrendered instead
of
fighting. Those that fought did so piecemeal rather than
as
acoordinated force. In Desert Storm, the internationalarms market had supplied a tyrant with weapons onlyone generation behind our own. Our technological advantage and well-trained joint forces were key
in
defeating the Iraqi Army with an absolute minimum
of
casualties. Unfortunately, the most severe test
of
many
of
ourweapons came not on the battlefield but from 20 years
of
criticism from uninformed "experts."As long as unstable regimes can purchase modernweapons on the open market-including the capability tomanufacture weapons
of
mass destruction-we must stayone technological step ahead
of
our potential adversaries. The Army
of
the future will be smaller. Itsprimary missions will probably require rapid deployments to remote theaters. We must learn
to
leverageadvanced technologies to quickly achieve decisive battlefield results. Each Army unit and its equipment mustbe more deployable and easier to sustain. As defensedollars shrink, we must actively search for weaponssystems not only more effective in combined and jointoperations but requiring less support. The weapons andunits
of
our future Army must dominate a battlefield
of
continuously evolving technology and allow
us
to fightoutnumbered and win.
U.S. ARMY AVIATION DIGEST
This month's
Aviation Digest
focuses on the RAH-66 Comanche-the
Army's
number one modernizationpriority that will replace our aging fleet
of
OH-58 A/CKiowa, OH-6 Cayuse,and
AH-I
scout and attackhelicopters. The Comanche solves the single most critical deficiency
of
today's
Army-the
ability to see thebattlefield. The lethality
of
tomorrow's battlefield dictates the reconnaissance mission be performed by anarmed helicopter. The Comanche is designed to see thebattlefield-then communicate, coordinate,and fight asa member
of
the joint and combined arms teams. As thecritical synergistic link, it will raise the effectiveness
of
the AH-64 Apache helicopter to its highest level.I was fortunate to be chairman
of
the Source Selection Evaluation Board (SSEB). Both contract teamssubmitted excellent proposals, and the board had anextremely difficult
job
in selecting one design and ensuring the Army received the best operational value.A key part
of
the SSEB was an operational suitability
(OPSUIT)
cell
of
II
"green-suit"
aviation professionals; their mission-ensure the winning Comanchedesign maximized the warfighting contribution to thejoint and combined arms teams, and ease
of
field operation. The OPSUIT team carefully examined and crosswalked each technical issue to ensure every system onthe Comanche performed its mission and remainedmaintainable, supportable, and operationally effective.
Defense News
called
OPSUIT
a "rare weaponsbuying strategy," but 1 expect future acquisition boardswill use this same approach.
It
combined the operationalsoldier and materiel
developer
under the
most
experienced leadership. It allowed this team to interact andarrive at a final assessment. The end result was a weaponsystem that fulfills the critical need for armed reconnaissance in the combined arms fight.Successful conclusion
of
the LH
SSEB-and
signingthe Demonstration/Validation Prototype phase con
tract-end
years
of
hard work by industry and ArmyA viation. This contract is the cornerstone
of
our
plansto modernize and, I believe, the payoff with Comanche
is
well worth the tremendous effort.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->