Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Marsupial Moles

Marsupial Moles

Ratings: (0)|Views: 6|Likes:
Published by draculavanhelsing
good guide
good guide

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: draculavanhelsing on Jun 11, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/27/2013

pdf

text

original

 
1
FAUNA
 of 
 AUSTRALIA
23. NOTORYCTIDAE
KEN A. JOHNSON &DAN W. WALTON
 
23. NOTORYCTIDAE2
 
23. NOTORYCTIDAE3
DEFINITION AND GENERAL DESCRIPTION
The family Notoryctidae (marsupial moles) is represented by a single genus andtwo extant named species that are endemic to Australia. There is no knownfossil record for the family and among the Marsupialia, the Notoryctidaecomprises the only wholly fossorial form.Marsupial Moles exhibit the general characteristics typically associated withfossorial mammals. They are of small size and the extremities are reduced inlength. The body form is tubular, the ear pinnae are absent and heavilykeratinized, bare skin covers the rostrum and short tail. There is no externalevidence of eyes. The body is covered with dense hair that is pale cream to whitein colour, usually burnished with gold to ocraceous tips. The pouch opensposteriorly and the epipubic bones are conspicuously reduced. Sand and sand-ridge areas of central and western Australia are the preferred habitats.
HISTORY OF DISCOVERY
The first specimen of 
 Notoryctes
to reach a scientific institution was collectedby W. Colthard on Idracowra Pastoral Lease, a cattle station in the southern partof the Northern Territory. He found some peculiar tracks near his camp at theFinke River and, following them, found the animal lying under a tussock of spinifex (
Triodia
or
Plectrachne
species). The specimen was forwarded,wrapped in a kerosene soaked rag enclosed in a revolver cartridge box, to theSouth Australian Museum some 1500 km to the south. It was received in aneviscerated and rather decomposed condition by E.C. Stirling, Director of theMuseum (Stirling 1888b, 1889, 1891a, 1891b).
Stirling (1888a) announced the discovery in a paper, ‘Notes upon a NewAustralian Mammal’, delivered at an Ordinary Meeting of the Royal Society of South Australia on September 4, 1888. About one year later it was recorded inthe Abstract of Proceedings of the Society for the Ordinary Meeting of September 10, 1889, that ‘Dr Stirling...would shortly submit a full diagnosis of the newly-discovered mammal...to which he gives the name
Psammoryctestyphlops
, gen. et spec’. Stirling (1891a) later recorded, however, that whileaccompanying an expedition led by the Earle of Kintore into central andnorthern Australia, during which Stirling visited Idracowra Station and acquiredfurther specimens, he was advised by ‘...his old friend and teacher, ProfessorNewton of Cambridge...’ that the name had already been appropriated foranother group of animals. Stirling (1891a) was required, therefore, to abandon
Psammoryctes
(sand-burrower) in favour of 
 Notoryctes
(southern-burrower).Discovery of Marsupial Moles caused great excitement among the scientificcommunity because of its very great likeness to the eutherian Cape moles(Chrysochloridae). The poor state of preservation of the first specimen made itdifficult to recognise features that would place it in any one of the major groupsand there was, consequently, a great deal of speculation. Stirling (1888a) couldfind no trace of a marsupium, epipubic bones or a separate urogenital orifice inthe poorly preserved specimen. This initially led him to think that the mole wasa member of the Monotremata. Intrigued by the dentition, Stirling ventured theopinion that the shape of the mandible and general tooth characteristics borestrong resemblance to those of 
 Amphitherium
. Jaws of this group had beenfound associated with the remains of plesiosaurs and pterodactyls and were atthat time the earliest known mammal remains. He qualified this opinion bynoting that his comments were speculative, but justified because ‘...the Society

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->