Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Modern Challenges to Traditional Justice: The Struggle to Deliver Remedy and Reparation in War-Affected Lango

Modern Challenges to Traditional Justice: The Struggle to Deliver Remedy and Reparation in War-Affected Lango

Ratings: (0)|Views: 741|Likes:
This report is part of a series by Feinstein International Center that examines the impact of armed conflict on civilian populations in northern Uganda and struggles for redress and remedy. Transitional justice mechanisms, including truth telling, reparation and prosecutions, are important processes that can help address past human rights violations and abuses, and can play a role in rebuilding the lives of the affected population and helping a country to move forward. To address the effects of the over two decades of armed conflict between the Government of Uganda (GoU) and Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rebel group, the Juba Peace Accords envisioned traditional justice mechanisms as instruments that could help address serious crimes and resulting harms suffered by civilians. However, after detailing the historical evolution of the traditional justice systems and the impact of the war on these systems, this study finds that traditional justice mechanisms are currently unable to fulfill these roles and are not being used to repair victims from harms suffered due to serious crimes committed by parties to the conflict. The report identifies and analyzes efforts by Langi traditional justice mechanisms to address serious crimes and violations committed during the conflict and their result¬ing harms and the reasons why they are unable to offer remedy. The report offers insights into implications for efforts to ensure victims’ rights to remedy and redress are upheld. This report is based on field work conducted with conflicted affected populations in Lango sub region, northern Uganda between the years 2009 – 2011. The Lango sub-region is home to approximately 2.13 million people and is among the sub regions most affected by the GoU and LRA war. We hope the findings of the study will contribute to inform larger transitional justice processes underway in Uganda, in part through addressing the realities and priorities of the affected population.
This report is part of a series by Feinstein International Center that examines the impact of armed conflict on civilian populations in northern Uganda and struggles for redress and remedy. Transitional justice mechanisms, including truth telling, reparation and prosecutions, are important processes that can help address past human rights violations and abuses, and can play a role in rebuilding the lives of the affected population and helping a country to move forward. To address the effects of the over two decades of armed conflict between the Government of Uganda (GoU) and Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rebel group, the Juba Peace Accords envisioned traditional justice mechanisms as instruments that could help address serious crimes and resulting harms suffered by civilians. However, after detailing the historical evolution of the traditional justice systems and the impact of the war on these systems, this study finds that traditional justice mechanisms are currently unable to fulfill these roles and are not being used to repair victims from harms suffered due to serious crimes committed by parties to the conflict. The report identifies and analyzes efforts by Langi traditional justice mechanisms to address serious crimes and violations committed during the conflict and their result¬ing harms and the reasons why they are unable to offer remedy. The report offers insights into implications for efforts to ensure victims’ rights to remedy and redress are upheld. This report is based on field work conducted with conflicted affected populations in Lango sub region, northern Uganda between the years 2009 – 2011. The Lango sub-region is home to approximately 2.13 million people and is among the sub regions most affected by the GoU and LRA war. We hope the findings of the study will contribute to inform larger transitional justice processes underway in Uganda, in part through addressing the realities and priorities of the affected population.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Feinstein International Center on Jun 11, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/12/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Strengthening the humanity and dignity of people in crisis through knowledge and practice
Modern Challenges to raditional Justice:
Te Struggle to Deliver Remedy andReparation in War-Aected Lango
 June 2013
eddy Atim and Keith Proctor 
 
©2013 Feinstein International Center. All Rights Reserved.Fair use of this copyrighted material includes its use for non-commercial educational pur-poses, such as teaching, scholarship, research, criticism, commentary, and news reporting.
Unless otherwise noted, those who wish to reproduce text and image les from this publica
 -tion for such uses may do so without the Feinstein International Center’s express permission.However, all commercial use of this material and/or reproduction that alters its meaning or
intent, without the express permission of the Feinstein International Center, is prohibited.
Feinstein International CenterTufts University114 Curtis StreetSomerville, MA 02144USAtel: +1 617.627.3423fax: +1 617.627.3428
c.tufts.edu
 
Suggested Citation
 Atim, eddy, and Keith Proctor (2013).
 Modern Challenges to raditional Justice: Te Struggle to Deliver Remedy and Reparation in War-Afected Lango
. Feinstein Interna-tional Center, uts University: Medord, USA.
 Acknowledgements
Te author grateully acknowledges organizations that supported the work: Comp-ton Foundation, and Rights and Democracy. I would also like to Tank Pro. DyanMazurana who supported the research and report process to its nality. Tank youor your tireless yet supportive role. I also thank Ariane Brunet or her support dur-ing eld research and analyses o the ndings. Te eld research would not havebeen possible without Howard Onyok who, as a research assistant to the project,helped in interviews and daily interaction in two study sites.Lastly, I would like to thank the people o the study sites or their openness and orgiving time to interact with the research team during the eld study.
Photo Credit 
Cover photo by Lily Korhonen

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->