Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
A Historical Perspective of State Aid, Tuition and Spending for State Universities in Kansas

A Historical Perspective of State Aid, Tuition and Spending for State Universities in Kansas

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,318 |Likes:
Published by Bob Weeks
State support for postsecondary education in Kansas is the subject of considerable debate in the 2013 Kansas Legislature. Governor Brownback proposes to hold state support steady in the upcoming budget, while House and Senate budget proposals have called for reductions in state aid of 4 percent and 2 percent, respectively. The Kansas Board of Regents recommended a $47.1 million increase in state aid.i As a result of these conflicting proposals, questions have understandably been raised regarding possible impact on tuition rates and other educational impacts.

Kansas Policy Institute, April 2013
State support for postsecondary education in Kansas is the subject of considerable debate in the 2013 Kansas Legislature. Governor Brownback proposes to hold state support steady in the upcoming budget, while House and Senate budget proposals have called for reductions in state aid of 4 percent and 2 percent, respectively. The Kansas Board of Regents recommended a $47.1 million increase in state aid.i As a result of these conflicting proposals, questions have understandably been raised regarding possible impact on tuition rates and other educational impacts.

Kansas Policy Institute, April 2013

More info:

Published by: Bob Weeks on Jun 13, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/13/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
A Historical Perspective of State Aid, Tuition and Spending for StateUniversities in Kansas
By: Dave Trabert and Todd Davidson
 April 11, 2013
Introduction
State support for postsecondary education in Kansas is the subject of considerable debate in the2013 Kansas Legislature. Governor Brownback proposes to hold state support steady in theupcoming budget, while House and Senate budget proposals have called for reductions in state aidof 4 percent and 2 percent, respectively. The Kansas Board of Regents recommended a $47.1million increase in state aid.
i
As a result of these conflicting proposals, questions haveunderstandably been raised regarding possible impact on tuition rates and other educationalimpacts.As Table 2 (page 2) shows, undergraduate tuition and fees at the six state-funded universitiesincreased 137 percent between 2002 and 2012.
ii
University officials often site a lack of statefunding as the cause of tuition increases, while some legislators point to large tuition increases asrationale for
funding decisions. This ‘chicken
-and-
egg’ debate
may well come down to a matter of perspective. Accordingly, this analysis compares annual changes in tuition and fees, inflation andstate funding to provide readers with data to reach their own informed opinions.We also examine university spending over the last ten fiscal years using data from The KansasBoard of Regents (KBOR).
iii
This analysis uses the KBOR designations for General Use OperatingExpenditures and All Funds Operating Expenditures.The six state-funded universities included in this analysis are the University of Kansas, Kansas StateUniversity, Wichita State University, Emporia State University, Pittsburg State University and Fort Hays State University. The KU Medical Center, Kansas State Veterinary Medical Center, the KansasState Extension Systems and Agricultural Research Program (ESARP) and the Kansas Board of Regents are excluded from all data in this analysis.
Medical facilities’ cost structures are
considerably higher and would artificially skew comparisons of spending patterns over time. Theextension system and the Board of Regents are excluded because much of this analysis is on a per-student basis.
 
 
A Historical Perspective of State Aid, Tuition and Spending for State Universities in Kansas
Page 2 of 17April 11, 2013
State Aid and Tuition
State aid to the six state-funded universities is essentially flat over the last ten years at $406.4million, although total aid is up 4.9 percent at $739.2 million.
iv
 Enrollment increased by 12 percent over the last ten years, with much of the gain attributable to aninnovative online venture in conjunction with the
Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of 
China at Fort Hays State University.
v
 Inflation increased 25.3 percent over the same period, based on changes in the Consumer PriceIndex for Midwest Urban Cities; we calculated the change using a July-June fiscal year average forcomparison to state funding and university spending reports.
vi
Table 2 compares the annualchange (all on a fiscal year basis) in inflation, state aid and undergraduate tuition and fees for thesix state-funded universities between 2002 and 2012.
UniversityFY2002FY2012ChangeFY2002FY2012Change
University of Kansas138,257,795137,889,806-0.3%22,88323,2901.8% Kansas State 106,969,910102,716,970-4.0%18,77620,0146.6% Wichita State 65,699,38466,750,1891.6%10,51111,68611.2% Emporia State 30,490,80930,911,3991.4%4,7274,9083.8% Pittsburg State 33,437,54034,633,8283.6%5,5556,98425.7% Fort Hays State 31,846,55733,329,5524.7%4,5758,19879.2% Total above406,701,995406,231,744-0.1%67,02775,08012.0%
State General Fund SpendingFTE Enrollment
Table 1: Ten-Year Change in State Aid and Enrollment
Source: Kansas Division of the Budget, Governor's Budget Reports, Schedule 2.2; Kansas Board of RegentsDatabooks, Table 2.1a Full Time Equivalent enrollment.
FiscalStateUniv. ofWichitaEmporiaPittsburgFort HaysAnnual YearInflationAidKansasK-StateStateStateStateStateAvg.
20032.0%-5.1%20.8%21.5%7.0%7.4%8.4%5.0%12.2%20041.9%0.9%17.7%17.9%14.7%13.1%16.9%9.0%15.3%20052.8%3.8%15.5%14.9%11.5%9.4%11.2%14.3%13.0%20063.4%5.4%14.3%9.8%8.3%8.9%8.1%5.2%9.5%20071.9%1.7%13.6%12.8%6.7%8.5%6.4%4.7%9.4%20083.6%4.0%7.3%7.9%6.4%9.5%7.1%5.1%7.3%20091.0%-3.9%6.7%6.3%5.8%5.3%6.5%5.5%6.1%20101.1%-6.5%5.3%3.7%7.6%5.8%6.2%6.3%5.6%20112.2%1.4%8.3%7.4%7.7%6.0%5.6%4.8%6.9%20122.9%-1.1%5.5%3.8%5.1%6.8%6.5%3.6%5.2%10 years25.3%-0.1%193.6%170.2%116.7%116.8%120.8%84.0%136.9%
Undergraduate Tuition and Fees
Table 2: Comparison of Annual Change in Inflation, State Aid and Tuition
Source: Kansas Board of Regents Databooks, Table 2.1a; Bureau of Labor Statistics, CPI for Midwest Urban Cities on aJuly-June basis; Kansas Division of the Budget, Governor's Budget Reports, Schedule 2.2 
 
 
A Historical Perspective of State Aid, Tuition and Spending for State Universities in Kansas
Page 3 of 17April 11, 2013
The declines in state aid for fiscal years 2003, 2009 and 2010 were all recession-related. As shownin Table 3, a precipitous drop in 2002 revenues nearly wiped out the General Fund ending balance(which by statute is to be 7.5 percent of expenditures). The Legislature reactedin 2003 with a 7.4 percent reduction intotal expenditures, considerably morethan the 5.1 percent reduction in aid tothe six state-funded universities.The protracted recession that began in2008 led to a two-year expenditurereduction of 13.7 percent, withspending dropping from $6.102 billionto $5.268 billion (Table 3). As was thecase in the previous recession, aid tothe six state-funded universitiesdeclined but to a much lesser extent than total spending, going from $450.7 million to $410.7 million, or 8.9 percent.It may be impossible to determine the extent to which prior year tuition increases may haveimpacted legislative funding decisions for universities. However, given that annual tuitionincreases were routinely three times greater (or more) than inflation, it would have been wellwithin reason for legislators to divert resources elsewhere given the extent to which universitiesincreased tuition revenue
and also given the demand for funding of other state functions.Legislators have been grappling with significant increases in K-12 and Human Services funding formany years. Table 4 shows that Human Services spending doubled over the last ten years,accounting for 25.4percent of total spendingin 2012 as compared to17.3 percent of totalspending in 2002.Court-mandatedincreases in K-12spending put additionalpressure on statefunding (Dept. of Education includes K-12,state schools for the deaf and blind and Dept. of Education operatingcosts).
Fiscal YearReceiptsExpend.BalancePercent
20014,415.04,429.6365.78.3%20024,108.34,466.112.10.3%20034,245.64,137.5122.73.0%20044,518.94,316.5327.57.6%20054,841.34,690.1478.710.2%20065,394.45,139.4733.614.3%20075,809.05,607.7935.016.7%20085,693.46,101.8526.68.6%20095,587.46,064.449.70.8%20105,191.35,268.0(27.1)-0.5%20115,882.15,666.6188.33.3%20126,412.86,098.1502.98.2%
Table 3: State General Fund Balances (millions)
Source: Governor's Budget Report for FY 2014
FiscalTotalRegentsDept. of HumanAll YearExpend.TotalEducationServicesOther 
20024,466.1704.52,345.1770.6645.920034,137.5670.02,124.5827.4515.620044,316.5673.62,186.4938.5518.020054,690.1706.12,336.31,098.1549.620065,139.4747.12,607.21,173.0612.120075,607.7782.12,843.41,319.8662.420086,101.8829.13,091.31,444.6736.820096,064.4799.83,161.71,358.5744.420105,268.0743.72,723.71,161.5639.120115,666.6751.32,985.11,265.5664.720126,098.1739.23,091.01,548.5719.42002-1236.5%4.9%31.8%100.9%11.4%
Table 4: State General Fund Expenditures (millions)
Source: Governor's Budget Reports, Schedule 2.2 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->