Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Experimental Investigations on a Standing-Wave Thermoacoustic Engine

Experimental Investigations on a Standing-Wave Thermoacoustic Engine

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,880|Likes:
Published by Mahmoud Shaaban
Thermoacoustic engine is one of the emerging technologies in the field of energy conversion. Thermoacoustic engines convert thermal energy, possibly at relatively low temperatures to mechanical energy in the form of acoustic oscillations of high amplitudes that can drive a thermoacoustic refrigerator or can be converted to electrical energy using a linear alternator. In this work, a prototype of a thermoacoustic engine was built, operated and tested. Sustainable operation of the engine is possible due to the relatively efficient hot and cold heat exchangers that were able to sustain the temperature gradient across the stack.
Both the transient and steady-state performance of the thermoacoustic engine are investigated using variable gas mixtures and using square-cell stacks of variable porosities. The engine performance is studied during full runs consisting of start-up, steady operation, and shutting-down. The steady-state engine performance and wave characteristics are investigated at different heat input values, different gas mixtures, and different stack porosities. Inserts with different patterns and open areas are used inside the resonator to investigate their effect on suppressing the high harmonics of the produced acoustic wave. A numerical model of the current prototype is built using the free simulation software DELTAEC. The model is validated using the experimental data and is then used to obtain more information about the engine performance.
Results show that the used gas mixture, the pressure ratio, and the stack cell dimensions significantly affect the engine power output, the wave dynamic pressure amplitude, and the harmonic content of the wave. Experimental data agrees with DELTAEC calculations in trend, but the values of acoustic power and dynamic pressure are significantly lower than the numerical model calculations. The values of the frequency are within 3% of the measured values.
The transient analysis shows that the dynamic pressure amplitude of the gas reaches a peak after onset and then decreases to a steady value during the run. The onset temperature of the engine is always higher than the temperature at which the system stops producing oscillations while shut-down. The hysteresis characteristics is significantly affected by the thermal conductivity of the gas mixture, the stack cell dimensions, the mean temperature at starting, and the time of the cycle. The heat exchange process at the cold side is enhanced by the existence of the wave.
In this work, several inserts of different thicknesses, open area, positions, and hole patterns are inserted into the resonator to suppress the harmonics. All inserts caused lower harmonic content with respect to the case with no inserts. Inserts of low open area cause the performance to degrade and produce low acoustic powers. Inserts with higher thickness gave better performance. Amongst all inserts used, the highest acoustic power is obtained using an insert with an open area of 50% of the resonator area, a pattern of several distributed holes, a thickness of 3 cm, and at a position of 0.33 of the fundamental wavelength measured from the cold-side blind flange.
Thermoacoustic engine is one of the emerging technologies in the field of energy conversion. Thermoacoustic engines convert thermal energy, possibly at relatively low temperatures to mechanical energy in the form of acoustic oscillations of high amplitudes that can drive a thermoacoustic refrigerator or can be converted to electrical energy using a linear alternator. In this work, a prototype of a thermoacoustic engine was built, operated and tested. Sustainable operation of the engine is possible due to the relatively efficient hot and cold heat exchangers that were able to sustain the temperature gradient across the stack.
Both the transient and steady-state performance of the thermoacoustic engine are investigated using variable gas mixtures and using square-cell stacks of variable porosities. The engine performance is studied during full runs consisting of start-up, steady operation, and shutting-down. The steady-state engine performance and wave characteristics are investigated at different heat input values, different gas mixtures, and different stack porosities. Inserts with different patterns and open areas are used inside the resonator to investigate their effect on suppressing the high harmonics of the produced acoustic wave. A numerical model of the current prototype is built using the free simulation software DELTAEC. The model is validated using the experimental data and is then used to obtain more information about the engine performance.
Results show that the used gas mixture, the pressure ratio, and the stack cell dimensions significantly affect the engine power output, the wave dynamic pressure amplitude, and the harmonic content of the wave. Experimental data agrees with DELTAEC calculations in trend, but the values of acoustic power and dynamic pressure are significantly lower than the numerical model calculations. The values of the frequency are within 3% of the measured values.
The transient analysis shows that the dynamic pressure amplitude of the gas reaches a peak after onset and then decreases to a steady value during the run. The onset temperature of the engine is always higher than the temperature at which the system stops producing oscillations while shut-down. The hysteresis characteristics is significantly affected by the thermal conductivity of the gas mixture, the stack cell dimensions, the mean temperature at starting, and the time of the cycle. The heat exchange process at the cold side is enhanced by the existence of the wave.
In this work, several inserts of different thicknesses, open area, positions, and hole patterns are inserted into the resonator to suppress the harmonics. All inserts caused lower harmonic content with respect to the case with no inserts. Inserts of low open area cause the performance to degrade and produce low acoustic powers. Inserts with higher thickness gave better performance. Amongst all inserts used, the highest acoustic power is obtained using an insert with an open area of 50% of the resonator area, a pattern of several distributed holes, a thickness of 3 cm, and at a position of 0.33 of the fundamental wavelength measured from the cold-side blind flange.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Mahmoud Shaaban on Jun 14, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial No-derivs

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/21/2013

pdf

text

original

 
EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS ON ASTANDING-WAVE THERMOACOUSTIC ENGINE
By
Mahmoud Mohamed Emam
A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Engineeringat Cairo University in Partial Fulfillment of theRequirements for the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCEInMECHANICAL POWER ENGINEERINGFACULTY OF ENGINEERING, CAIRO UNIVERSITYGIZA, EGYPT2013
 
 
II
EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS ON ASTANDING-WAVE THERMOACOUSTIC ENGINE
By
Mahmoud Mohamed Emam
InMECHANICAL POWER ENGINEERINGUnder Supervision of FACULTY OF ENGINEERING, CAIRO UNIVERSITYGIZA, EGYPT2013Prof. Dr. Mahmoud A. Fouad
 
Professor of Mechanical PowerMechanical Power Engineering Department,Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University
 A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Engineering at Cairo University in PartialFulfillment of the Requirements for theDegree of MASTER OF SCIENCE
Dr. Ehab Abdel-Rahman
 
Associate Professor of PhysicsSchool of Sciences and EngineeringAmerican University in Cairo
 
Dr. Abdelmaged H. Ibrahim Essawey
Assistant Professor, Mechanical PowerEngineering Department,Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University
 
 
IV
Engineer’s Name:
 
Mahmoud Mohamed Emam
Date of Birth:
01/01/1989
 Nationality:
Egyptian
E-mail:
emam.mahmoud@gmail.com
 Phone:
+2 011 1123 8133
Address:
16 Ard El-kamb, Elkanater Elkhairia, Qalubia,
 
Egypt
Registration Date:
01/10
 
/2010
 
Awarding Date:
/ /
 
Degree:
Master of Science
Department:
Mechanical Power Engineering
 Supervisors:
Prof. Mahmoud Ahmed FouadDr. Ehab Abdel-RahmanDr. Abdelmaged H. Ibrahim Essawy
Examiners:
Prof. Mahmoud A. El-Kady (External Examiner)Prof. Essam E. Khalil (Internal Examiner)Prof. Mahmoud A. Fouad (Main Advisor)
Thesis Title:Experimental Investigations on A Standing-Wave ThermoacousticEngineKey Words:Thermoacoustic; Engine; Hysteresis; Acoustic; HarmonicsSummary:
In this work, both the transient and steady-state performance of thethermoacoustic engine are investigated using variable gas mixtures and usingsquare-cell stacks of variable porosities. Transient engine performance isstudied during full runs consisting of start-up, steady operation, and shutting-down. The steady-state engine performance and wave characteristics areinvestigated at variable steady heat input values using different gas mixturesand stack porosities. Inserts with different patterns and open areas are usedinside the resonator to investigate their effect on suppressing the high harmonicsof the produced acoustic wave. Results are compared with numerical simulationcarried out using the free simulation software DELTAEC.

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
Mahmoud Shaaban liked this
1 hundred reads
Mahmoud Shaaban liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->