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Table Of Contents

References
Further Reading
IAX Frames
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Full Frames
4.2.1 Structure
4.5 Encrypted Frames
4.6 Conclusion
IAX Information Elements
5.1 Introduction
5.2 List of IAX Information Elements
5.3 Example of IAX Information Element Traces
IAX Messages
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Taxonomy of IAX Messages
6.3 IAX Requests/Responses
6.3.1 IAX Requests
6.3.2 IAX Responses
6.3.3 Information Elements and IAX Messages
6.4 IAX Functional Categories
6.5 IAX Media Frames
6.6 IAX Reliable/Unreliable Messages
IAX Connectivity Considerations
7.1 Introduction
7.2 IAX Transport Protocol
7.3 IAX Port Number
7.4 IAX Call Multiplexing and Demultiplexing
7.5 IAX Reliability Mechanism
7.5.1 IAX Timers
7.5.2 Registration
7.5.3 Retransmission
7.5.4 Connectivity
7.6 Authentication and Encryption
7.7 Conclusion
IAX Operations
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Provisioning and Firmware Download
8.2.1 Context
8.2.2 Provisioning Examples
8.2.3 Firmware Update
8.3 Registration
8.3.1 Procedure
8.3.2 Call Flow Examples
8.4 Call Setup
8.4.1 Procedure
8.4.2 Successful Call Setup Flows
8.4.3 Unsuccessful Call Setup Flow
8.4.4 Call Setup with a Server
8.5 Call Tear-Down
8.6 Call Monitoring
8.7 Call Optimisation
8.7.1 Context
8.7.2 Examples of a Call Transfer Call Flow
8.8 Conclusion
IAX and Advanced Services
9.1 Introduction
9.2 CODEC Negotiation
9.3 Video Sessions
9.4 Negotiation of Several Media Types in the Same IAX Session
9.5 Presence Services
9.6 Instant Messaging
9.7 Topology Hiding
9.8 Mobility
9.8.1 Personal Mobility
9.8.2 IP Mobility
9.9 Miscellaneous
9.10 Conclusion
Multi-IAX Servers Environment
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Focus
. Discovery of IAX resources
10.3 Discovery of IAX Resources
10.3.2 DUNDi
10.3.3 TRIP
10.4 Setting End-to-End Calls
10.5 Load Balancing
10.5.1 Objective
10.5.2 Implementation Alternatives
10.6 Path-Coupled and Path-Decoupled Discussion
10.6.1 Service Provider Requirements
10.6.2 SIP: a Path-Decoupled Protocol
10.6.3 IAX: a Path-Coupled Signalling Protocol
10.6.4 Discussion
10.7 Forking
10.8 Route Symmetry
10.9 Conclusion
IAX and NAT Traversal
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Structure
11.3 NAT Types
11.3.1 Overview
11.3.2 Examples of NAT Types
11.4 IAX and NAT Traversal Discussion
11.4.1 Reference Architecture
11.4.2 Discussion
11.5 Operational Considerations
11.5.1 Deployment Scenarios
11.5.2 The IP Exhaustion Problem
11.5.3 IAX, NAT and P2P Considerations
11.6 Conclusion
IAX and Peer-to-Peer Deployment Scenarios
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Scope
12.3 A P2P Solution for Corporate Customers
12.3.1 MEVA Architecture
12.3.2 MEVA-Related IAX Frames
12.3.3 MEVA Information Elements
12.3.4 How to Subscribe to a MEVA Service
12.3.5 Contact Table
12.3.6 Session Establishment
12.3.7 Leaving the MEVA Service
12.3.8 Optimisation Issues
12.3.9 MEVA Architecture with a Point-de-Rendezvous
12.4 Conclusion
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Context and Assumptions
13.3 Service Migration to IPv6
13.4 Structure
13.5 The IP Address Exhaustion Problem
13.6 IPv6: a Long-Term Solution
13.6.1 Overview
13.6.2 Between IPv4 and IPv6: Where Is IPv5?
13.6.3 IPv6 at a Glance
the SIP Example
13.7.1 Overview
13.7.2 Additional SIP Tags including IP-Related Information
13.7.3 IPv6-Embedded SIP Examples
13.8 IAX: an IP Version-Agnostic Protocol?
13.9 Deployment of IAX Services in a Pure IPv6 Environment
13.10 Heterogeneous Environment
13.10.1 Context and Reference Architecture
13.10.2 Analysis of Registration-Based Operations
13.10.3 Call Setup and Call Optimisation
13.11 Conclusion
IAX: Towards a Lightweight SBC?
14.1 Introduction
14.2 IP Telephony Administrative Domain
14.3 Deployment Scenarios
14.3.1 Access Segment
14.3.2 Interconnection Segment
14.4 Deployment Contexts
14.4.1 Legal Requirements
14.4.2 Technical Considerations
14.5 Service Limitations Caused by SBCs
14.6 Functional Decomposition
14.7 Taxonomy of SBC Functions in an SIP Environment
14.8 Validity of these Functions in an IAX Architecture
Migration to IPv6: Easing IPv4–IPv6 Interworking
15.7.7 Routing Considerations
15.7.8 IPv6–IPv4 Interworking
15.7.9 Keep-Alive Feature
15.7.10 Forking
15.7.11 Routing
15.8 Taxonomy
15.8.1 Access Segment
15.8.2 Core Segment
15.8.3 Border Segment
15.9 Introducing IAX into Operational Networks
15.9.1 Rationale
15.9.2 Alternatives
15.10 Conclusion
IAX in the Access Segment of SIP-Based Service Architectures
16.1 Introduction
16.2 A ‘High-Level’ Description of the Interworking Function
16.3 Examples of Call Flows
16.3.1 Reference Architecture
16.3.2 Provisioning and Firmware Update of End Devices
16.3.3 Registration without Authentication
16.3.4 Registration with Authentication
16.3.5 Call Setup
16.3.6 Call Tear-Down
16.3.7 Aliveness of Registered Users
16.3.8 Registration Release without Authentication
16.3.9 Registration Release with Authentication
16.4 Bandwidth Optimisation: An Extension to SIP
16.5 Conclusion
Validation Scenario
17.1 Overview
17.2 Configuring Asterisk Servers
17.2.2 Configuration Files
17.3 Configuring the SIP Express Router (SER)
17.3.1 Overview
17.3.2 Configuration File
17.4 User Agent Configuration
17.5 Conclusion
Index
P. 1
Inter-Asterisk Exchange (IAX): Deployment Scenarios in SIP-Enabled Networks

Inter-Asterisk Exchange (IAX): Deployment Scenarios in SIP-Enabled Networks

Ratings: (0)|Views: 854|Likes:
Published by Wiley
Find out how IAX can complement SIP to overcome complications encountered in current SIP-based communications

Written by an expert in the field of telecommunications, this book describes the Inter-Asterisk Exchange protocol (IAX) and its operations, discussing the main characteristics of the protocol including NAT traversal, security, IPv6 support, interworking between IPv4 and IPv6, interworking with SIP and many others. The author presents the ways in which IAX can be activated so as to avoid complications such as NAT and the presence of intermediary boxes in operational architectures. This book analytically demonstrates the added values of IAX protocol compared to existing ones, while proposing viable deployment scenarios that assess the behavior of the protocol in operational networks.

Key Features:

Promotes a viable alternative protocol to ease deployment of multimedia services Analyses the capabilities of the IAX protocol and its ability to meet VoIP service provider requirements, and provides scenarios of introducing IAX within operational architectures Addresses the advantages and disadvantages of SIP, and Details the features of IAX that can help, in junction with SIP, to overcome various disadvantages of SIP Explores the added values of IAX protocol compared to existing protocols Discusses the compatibility of new adopted architectures and associated protocols

This book will be a valuable reference for service providers, protocol designers, vendors and service implementers. Lecturers and advanced students computer science, electrical engineering and telecoms courses will also find this book of interest.

Find out how IAX can complement SIP to overcome complications encountered in current SIP-based communications

Written by an expert in the field of telecommunications, this book describes the Inter-Asterisk Exchange protocol (IAX) and its operations, discussing the main characteristics of the protocol including NAT traversal, security, IPv6 support, interworking between IPv4 and IPv6, interworking with SIP and many others. The author presents the ways in which IAX can be activated so as to avoid complications such as NAT and the presence of intermediary boxes in operational architectures. This book analytically demonstrates the added values of IAX protocol compared to existing ones, while proposing viable deployment scenarios that assess the behavior of the protocol in operational networks.

Key Features:

Promotes a viable alternative protocol to ease deployment of multimedia services Analyses the capabilities of the IAX protocol and its ability to meet VoIP service provider requirements, and provides scenarios of introducing IAX within operational architectures Addresses the advantages and disadvantages of SIP, and Details the features of IAX that can help, in junction with SIP, to overcome various disadvantages of SIP Explores the added values of IAX protocol compared to existing protocols Discusses the compatibility of new adopted architectures and associated protocols

This book will be a valuable reference for service providers, protocol designers, vendors and service implementers. Lecturers and advanced students computer science, electrical engineering and telecoms courses will also find this book of interest.

More info:

Publish date: Jan 21, 2009
Added to Scribd: Jun 16, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780470742198
List Price: $130.00 Buy Now

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