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Ttr Calif Reason Baker

Ttr Calif Reason Baker

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Published by: National Education Policy Center on Jun 18, 2013
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EVIEW OF
 EIGHTED
 S 
TUDENT 
 F 
UNDING FOR
 ALIFORNIA
 
 Reviewed By
Bruce BakerRutgers UniversityJune 2013
Summary of Review
 A new policy brief from the Reason Foundation examines California Governor Jerr
Brown’s school finance reform plan. It touts the benefits of the reform and makes
suggestions for improvements, some of which are based on a recently adopted school
finance bill in Colorado. The Reason report asserts that Brown’s proposed plan is better
than the status quo, arguing that it has the potential to more equitably distribute fundingacross local public school districts. Yet no data are presented or evaluated to support these
claims. The bulk of Reason’s report is dedicated to the claim that Brown’s reforms should be expanded to include “money follows the child.” That is, weighted student fund
ingshould be distributed directly to the school, and the principal should be providedautonomy in the way the money is spent. While the claim is made that such a system ismore equitable, efficient and transparent, little evidence is available or presented thatsupports this claim. The report instead offers a highly filtered summary of existingliterature on the efficacy of weighted student funding for improving educational equity or
school quality. While many would concur that California’s funding system
is in disrepair,the Reason report offers little precise or valuable guidance for policymakers. 
 
 
Kevin Welner
 Project Director
William Mathis
 Managing Director
Erik Gunn
 Managing Editor
National Education Policy Center
School of Education, University of ColoradoBoulder, CO 80309-0249Telephone: (802) 383-0058Email: NEPC@colorado.eduhttp://nepc.colorado.edu
Publishing Director: Alex Molnar
This is one of a series of Think Twice think tank reviews made possible in part by funding from the Great LakesCenter for Education Research and Practice. It is also available at http://greatlakescenter.org.
This material is provided free of cost to NEPC's readers, who may make non-commercial use of thematerial as long as NEPC and its author(s) are credited as the source. For inquiries about commercial use, please contact NEPC at nepc@colorado.edu.
 
 
 
http://nepc.colorado.edu/thinktank/review-weighted-student-funding-calif 
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EVIEW OF
 EIGHTED
 S 
TUDENT 
 F 
UNDING FOR
 ALIFORNIA
 
 Bruce Baker, Rutgers University
I. Introduction
Weighted Student Funding for California
, the new policy brief from the ReasonFoundation,
examines California Governor Jerry Brown’s school finance reform plan. It
touts the benefits of the reform and makes suggestions for improvements, some of whichare based on a recently adopted school finance bill in Colorado.
1
The Reason report asserts
that Brown’s proposed plan is better than the
status quo, arguing that it has the potentialto more equitably distribute funding across local public school districts. Yet no data arepresented or evaluated to support these claims. The bulk of the brief is instead dedicatedto the claim that additional controls are needed to ensure that equitable funding isdistributed to students in the specific schools they attend.The report argues that the state should require local district adoption of 
weighted student  funding (WSF)
formulas, which means passing along to schools the weighted state fundsallocated to the district for each student. The policy brief argues that the literatureinvariably supports the contention that driving these funds down to the school levelimproves within-district equity. But this assertion is drawn from a filtered reading of theliterature. As discussed herein, the literature on the equity successes of district-level weighted funding formulas is mixed. Yet, even though sufficient evidence to establish thatlink is lacking, the Reason Foundation makes the leap of suggesting that just such reformsin Oakland and San Francisco are responsible for achievement gains. The report alsoasserts that the benefits of decentralized control are uncontroversial and are perceivedpositively by the involved parties. But even the reports cited in the brief raise questionsabout buy-in from principals.
II. Findings and Conclusions of the Report
The report asserts that the major advantages of the California finance reform proposal areas follows:

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