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The Beveridge Report [1942]

The Beveridge Report [1942]

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Published by theinsomnianiac
This report revolutionised life in Britain after the second world war making life better for every generation to come. More often referred to as the Beveridge report, the full name of this document is actually "Social Insurance and Allied Services - Report by Sir William Beveridge"

Published in 1942, it was the result of research undertaken by Sir William Beveridge at the behest of one Arthur Greenwood, M.P. It identified the five ‘Giant Evils’ which Beveridge believed the government should fight namely: ‘Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness.’ and outlined the ways in which he felt the government could and should tackle these problems.

His proposals - including the idea for a national system providing free medical care for all (the NHS) - were later implemented by the post-war Labour government under Clem Atlee, and formed the basis of the social secuirty system in the UK.

The introduction states;

"On the 10th June, 1941, the Minister without Portfolio (the Rt. Hon.Arthur Greenwood, M.P.) announced in the House of Commons that he had arranged with all the Departments concerned for a comprehensive survey of
existing schemes of social insurance and allied services which would be considered in due course by the Committee on Reconstruction Problems of which he was chairman; and that Sir William Beveridge had accepted his invitation to become Chairman of an interdepartmental Committee which would conduct the survey, taking into account representations received from responsible
organisations and persons concerned with the problems involved."

So, if this was a report produced by a committee, why do we only credit Beveridge with having created this report? It may have something to do with a letter, also included in the report;

"The following letter was sent to the Chairman on the 27th January, 1942 by the Minister without Portfolio.

My dear Beveridge,
I have discussed with the Chancellor of the Exchequer the position of the departmental representatives on the Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services. In view of the issues of high policy
which will arise, we think that the departmental representatives should henceforward be regarded as your advisers and assessors on the various technical and administrative matters with which they are severally concerned. This means that the Report, when made, will be your own report; it will be signed by you alone, and the departmental representatives will not be associated in any way with the views and recommendations on questions of policy which it contains. It would be well that the Report should contain words to make it clear that this is the position.
Yours sincerely,
(Signed) ARTHUR GREENWOOD."

This report revolutionised life in Britain after the second world war making life better for every generation to come. More often referred to as the Beveridge report, the full name of this document is actually "Social Insurance and Allied Services - Report by Sir William Beveridge"

Published in 1942, it was the result of research undertaken by Sir William Beveridge at the behest of one Arthur Greenwood, M.P. It identified the five ‘Giant Evils’ which Beveridge believed the government should fight namely: ‘Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness.’ and outlined the ways in which he felt the government could and should tackle these problems.

His proposals - including the idea for a national system providing free medical care for all (the NHS) - were later implemented by the post-war Labour government under Clem Atlee, and formed the basis of the social secuirty system in the UK.

The introduction states;

"On the 10th June, 1941, the Minister without Portfolio (the Rt. Hon.Arthur Greenwood, M.P.) announced in the House of Commons that he had arranged with all the Departments concerned for a comprehensive survey of
existing schemes of social insurance and allied services which would be considered in due course by the Committee on Reconstruction Problems of which he was chairman; and that Sir William Beveridge had accepted his invitation to become Chairman of an interdepartmental Committee which would conduct the survey, taking into account representations received from responsible
organisations and persons concerned with the problems involved."

So, if this was a report produced by a committee, why do we only credit Beveridge with having created this report? It may have something to do with a letter, also included in the report;

"The following letter was sent to the Chairman on the 27th January, 1942 by the Minister without Portfolio.

My dear Beveridge,
I have discussed with the Chancellor of the Exchequer the position of the departmental representatives on the Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services. In view of the issues of high policy
which will arise, we think that the departmental representatives should henceforward be regarded as your advisers and assessors on the various technical and administrative matters with which they are severally concerned. This means that the Report, when made, will be your own report; it will be signed by you alone, and the departmental representatives will not be associated in any way with the views and recommendations on questions of policy which it contains. It would be well that the Report should contain words to make it clear that this is the position.
Yours sincerely,
(Signed) ARTHUR GREENWOOD."

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Categories:Types, Business/Law
Published by: theinsomnianiac on Jun 18, 2013
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11/22/2013

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SOCIAL INSURANCEAND ALLIED SERVICES
Report by
SIR WILLIAM BEVERIDGE
to Padianwni by Com;t.Gn4
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SOCIAL INSURANCE AND ALLIED SERVICES
On the 10th June, 1941, the Minister without Portfolio (the Rt. Hon.Arthur Greenwood, M.P.) announced in the House of Commons that he hadarranged with all the Departments concerned for a comprehensive survey ofexisting schemes of social insurance and allied services which would be con-sidered in due course by the Committee on Reconstruction Problems of whichhe was chairman ; and that Sir William Beveridge had accepted his invitationto become Chairman of an interdepartmental Committee which would conduct
the
survey, taking into account representations received from responsibleorganisations and persons concerned with the problems involved.The constitution of the Committee was as follows :—
Chairman
—Sir
William Beveridge, K.C.B.
Departmental
Representatives
—Mr.
R. R. Bannatyne, C.B., Home Office ;Mr. P. Y. Blundun, Ministry of Labour and National Service-; Miss M. S. Cox,O.B.E., Ministry of Pensions ; Sir George Epps, K.B.E., C.B., GovernmentActuary ; Mr. R. Hamilton Farrell, Ministry of Health ; Mr. E. Hale, C.B.,Treasury ; Mrs. M. A. Hamilton, Reconstruction Secretariat; Mr. A. W.McKenzie, Board of Customs and Excise ; Sir George Reid, K.B.E., C.B.,Assistance Board ; Miss M. Ritson, C.B.E., Department of Health for Scotland ;Mr. B. K. White, Registry of Friendly Societies and Office of the IndustrialAssurance Commissioner.
Secretary—
Mr.
D. N. Chester.The terms of reference were :—To undertake, with special reference to the inter-relation of theschemes, a survey of the existing national schemes of social insuranceand allied services, including workmen's compensation, and to makerecommendations.The Minister without Portfolio announced in the House of Commons on27th January, 1942, that " it will be within the power of the Committee toconsider developments of the National Insurance Schemes in the way of addingdeath benefits with any other risks which are at. present not covered by suchschemes. 'The following letter was sent to the Chairman on the 27th January, 1942,by the Minister without Portfolio.My dear Beveridge,I have discussed with the Chancellor of the Exchequer the position ofthe departmental representatives on the Inter-departmental Committee onSocial Insurance and Allied Services. In view of the issues of high policywhich will arise, we think that the departmental representatives shouldhenceforward be regarded as your advisers and assessors on the various tech-nical and administrative matters with which they are severally concerned.This means that the Report, when made, will be your own report; it will besigned by you alone, and the departmental representatives will not beassociated in any way with the views and recommendations on questionsof policy which it contains. It would be well that the Report should containwords to make it clear that this is the position.Yours sincerely,(Signed) ARTHUR GREENWOOD.
The estimated gross cost
ol
the preparation of this Report is Z4.625 0s. 0d.. of which£3,150 0s. Od. represents the estimated cost of printing and publishing the Report andthe Volume of M^morauda iron* Organisations.
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The Rt. Hon. Sir William Jowilt, K.C., M.P.,His Majesty's Paymaster-General.
SIR,
I have the honour to submit the enclosed Report arising out of the workof the Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Servicesappointed by your predecessor as Minister concerned with reconstructionproblems, Mr. Arthur Greenwood, in June, 1941. For : reasons set outin the Report itself (paragraph 40), the Report" is made by myself alone asChairman.
It
falls to me, therefore, on behalf of the Committee, in transmitting thisReport to you, to express with more than conventional appreciation thegratitude of the Committee, as well as of
myself,
for
the
work of their Secretary,Mr. D. N. Chester. Without his able and untiring service and his orderlymarshalling of our proceedings, the preparation of this Report could not havebeen accomplished. I take this opportunity of expressing at the same timemy gratitude to my colleagues on the Committee who have so unreservedlyplaced at my disposal, in framing my Report and the recommendations forwhich I alone am responsible, their information and experience relating tothe immense range of problems with which the work of the Committee wasconcerned,I have the honour" to be, Sir,Your obedient servant,
VV. H. BEVERIDGE,
Chairman.
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November,
1942.
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