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Early Manhood of Jesus

Early Manhood of Jesus

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Published by glennpease
BY T. VINCENT TYMMS, D.D.


"And Jesus advanced in wisdom and stature, and in favour
with God and men." LUKE ii. 52.

" Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, and brother of
James and Joses and Judas and Simon ? and are not his sisters
here with us? " MARK vi. 3.
BY T. VINCENT TYMMS, D.D.


"And Jesus advanced in wisdom and stature, and in favour
with God and men." LUKE ii. 52.

" Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, and brother of
James and Joses and Judas and Simon ? and are not his sisters
here with us? " MARK vi. 3.

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Published by: glennpease on Jun 21, 2013
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EARLY MAHOOD OF JESUSBY T. VICET TYMMS, D.D."And Jesus advanced in wisdom and stature, and in favourwith God and men." LUKE ii. 52." Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon ? and are not his sistershere with us? " MARK vi. 3.THE above verse from Luke is the onlydirect statement of the manner in which Jesuspassed eighteen years of life. It describes ourLord as continuing the course of growth whichwe have previously considered in connectionwith His childhood. The only added thoughtis that contained in the words, " in favour withGod and man." But even this expression isnot so new as it sounds, for the word translated" favour" is the same as is rendered "grace"in verse 40, and happily denotes a specialaspect of its varied meaning. Because Jesuswas arrayed in the beauty of God, He becameincreasingly fair and lovely in the sight of allbeholders. The better He was known, and themore lustrously His nature was revealed in73The Private Relationships of Christmaturing life, the more He was honoured andbeloved.The special value of Luke's statement transpireswhen we connect it with the information con-
 
veyed by Mark. The men with whom Jesusfound favour must certainly include the brethrenand sisters mentioned by Mark. If Jesus hadbeen esteemed only by those who knew nothingof His home life, Luke's statement would havebeen utterly false. His primary reference musthave been to those who knew Jesus most inti-mately, and were best qualified to estimate Hischaracter and worth. At first sight the fact thusbrought out may seem unimportant ; or, at anyrate, so trite as to demand no emphatic utterance.To some lovers of Jesus it may sound almost assuperfluous as a declaration that in former agesthe sun was luminous. But although the sunwas bright before man walked the earth, and hasnever been dimmed, its brilliance has not alwaysbeen visible. In this cloudy world it is not super-fluous to record that on any given day the sunshone brightly. In the same way it is not asmall thing to say that at a particular part of Hislife men saw the radiance of the Sun of Righteous-ness. There came a time when His brightness74In Early Manhoodwas obscured by dense mists of prejudice, andwhen Jesus ceased to find favour in the eyes of His relatives. In the face of such a painful factas this, it becomes supremely important to knowthat the hostility and contempt which His familyafterwards displayed were not due to any lack of love or esteem for Him as a kinsman, before Helaunched out upon His public career. The com-bined records of Mark and Luke prove that theantagonism of Christ's brethren followed a greatrevulsion of feeling, caused by His public action,
 
and not by His personal character. It is possible,and indeed it is probable, that feelings of personal pique and disappointment influencedthe brothers, and helped to bring about that openrupture of which we shall have to speak morefully hereafter. But to whatever extent thesefeelings prevailed, it is evident that they wereexcited by the twofold fact that as Jesus beganHis public career He passed into a region whereprivate ties were not allowed to influence Him ;and that His chosen method of work gave nopromise of social or political elevation to theroyal house of David.At this point it becomes necessary to ask what was the precise relationship which these75The Private Relationships of Christ" brethren " and " sisters " bore to Jesus. Threetheories claim attention. First, it is contendedthat they were brethren only in theTLQOBrethren vague sense of being near kindred,and Sisters and were in all probability the cousinsof Jesus r T rm 1of Jesus. This opinion is a baselessinvention, and involves so many absurdities andcontradictions that it does not deserve seriousdiscussion. Had these men and women not

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