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Cavillers Silenced, Bystanders Instructed.

Cavillers Silenced, Bystanders Instructed.

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Published by glennpease

MATTHEW xxii. 15 and 46.

" Then went the Pharisees, and took counsel hoxv they might
entangle him in his talk.

" And no man was able to answer him a word, neither durst
any man from that day forth ask him any more ques
tions."

MATTHEW xxii. 15 and 46.

" Then went the Pharisees, and took counsel hoxv they might
entangle him in his talk.

" And no man was able to answer him a word, neither durst
any man from that day forth ask him any more ques
tions."

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Published by: glennpease on Jun 21, 2013
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CAVILLERS SILECED, BYSTADERS ISTRUCTED.JOH HAMPDE GUEEY, M.A.MATTHEW xxii. 15 and 46." Then went the Pharisees, and took counsel hoxv they mightentangle him in his talk." And no man was able to answer him a word, neither durstany man from that day forth ask him any more questions."VERY accessible, we find, was the Lord of Lifeand Glory when He dwelt as a Teacher amongmankind, very ready to expound the law of Truth and Righteousness, very patient withobjectors and cavillers, very gracious in affording to honest inquirers what they desired toknow and were able to bear. This, however, wasnot all. It is impossible to read such a Chapteras this, containing brief dialogues between theSaviour on the one hand, and a succession of questioners on the other, without being struck with thepeculiar aptness of the reply in each case, atonce disappointing the men who sought maliciously to entangle Him in His talk, and layingD 236 CAVILLERS SILECED;down some comprehensive principle, or proclaiming some fundamental law of the Divine government, which became as food to the hungeringsouls among the multitude, while ten thousandmore felt the power of His words, and acknow
 
ledged in their secret hearts that He was a Prophet, and more than a Prophet.And truly those words of the Son of Godreached farther still. Speakers and listeners hadthe benefit of them in the first instance ; but He,who had Centuries and Cycles of time all presentto His view, looked far beyond the extremestverge of the largest audience ever gathered onthe mountain or the shore, in synagogue or temple. Words like His were not to perish out of remembrance ; they were to be spirit and life tothe men of that generation, and to a hundredgenerations after them. The sentence droppedby the way side, because some enemy longed toaccuse Him, or some lowly-minded disciple seizedthe opportunity of instruction, was like an arrowthat struck many marks. It corrected a Jewishprejudice, perhaps, on the instant ; or won anaudience for the message of salvation among themen who saw the Lord ; and it penetrates Christian hearts to this day, and becomes the text formany sermons, the sword to smite, or the balm toheal, wherever the Truth is preached, or theBible read. may we treasure up these choicesayings as they deserve ! May we be upon ourguard against the common mistake of reading theBYSTADERS ISTRUCTED. 37simplest narrative in the Gospels, as a mere taleof things gone by! May we not think soundslike those which meet our ear to-day too familiarto suggest some needful warning, or precious lesson ! as we listen to Him whom to know truly isEternal Life.ow let us turn to the questioners. The par
 
ticular things spoken of are remote from our ownexperience ; but the principles involved in ourLord s replies are applicable to all times.There is, first of all, that crafty device of the Pharisees. The men come with nattering words on theirlips, pretending to do honour to our Lord. Master,ice know that Thou art true, and teachest the way of God in truth; neither carest Thou for any man; forThou regardest not the person of men. High praisefor any teacher ! hardly won by the best, utterlyundeserved by many, yet due, we know, in themost absolute sense, to Him who feared none andfavoured none, whose sternest censures fell everon the men of pride and power, while His tokensof special favour and encouragement were for thedesolate and forsaken. Yet all this homage was inpretence, not in reality. Christ was the people sProphet, not theirs, and cunningly they purposedeither to damage His reputation or to endangerHis safety. Very sensitive, up to this day, werethe descendants of Abraham, as to their nationalhonour, and very unwilling to be reminded that aforeign yoke was really on their necks. Very jealous, too, were the Roman authorities as to any38 CAVILLERS SILECED;denial of Caesar s sovereignty, or any claim of independence founded on historic recollections of their ancient state.Between these two perils our Lord was apparently shut in. So thought the men who pliedHim with that inquiry about the tribute money ;but He found a door of escape, and left themabashed and confounded. Plain facts could not bedenied ; at Jerusalem, as at Rome, the power of 

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