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Newsletter 0623

Newsletter 0623

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Published by Bee Ayer
Youth Farm 2013 Newsletter
Youth Farm 2013 Newsletter

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Published by: Bee Ayer on Jun 24, 2013
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11/22/2013

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THE YOUTH FARM
at the High School for Public Service
NEWSLETTER
 
Week of June 24
th
 2013
www.HSPSFarm.BlogSpot.com
Welcome! This week is our first week of our 2013 FlowerCSA, and we
couldn’t
be happier to share with you someof our favorite flowers! We love the bright blue bachelorbuttons and the contrast with the amni visnaga andcilantro flower.We have a few flower shares still available for the flowerlovers out there. What makes our flowers special (on topof being grown in Brooklyn at an educational farm) is thatthey are both seasonal and organic. For those of you that
don’t
know, the conventional flower industry has some of the worst labor practices and health standards around.This is based both on the heavy heavy use of toxicchemicals for growing and preserving, as well as thedemand for the same type of flowers all year long.We want to share with you the joys and challenges of running an organic educational farm, so you can fullyappreciate what we produce. With that in mind we havesome bad news to share. Last year we discovered that wehave a horrible soil pest on the farm.
Symphylans.
BOO!
Symphylans
are asmall white centipedelooking insect that eatthe new root growthon plants.What this means isthat it is taking ourplants a very very longtime to grow, becauseas much as they try, their new roots keep getting eaten.They thrive in loose high organic soil, the exact sameconditions that organic farmers strive for; making them avery difficult pest to get rid of.Symphylans are not very common in the North West, wethink because they
don’t
do well over very cold winters.However, with the warmer and warmer climates, theintroduction and population of new pests is starting tobecome a serious problem.We are not giving upthough! We have beenbattling them for the pastyear, compacting our soil(gasp), trying to cut downon organic matter contentin the soil (double gasp), but to no avail. So this past weekwe stepped it up, and applied billions of parasiticnematodes to our beds. The nematodes will hopefullyfind the little buggers, lay their eggs in them, anddecrease the symphylans population. Please wish ourlittle nematodes luck!We also want to let you know, that because of thesehorrible pests, some of our produce will be late, and somewe may just not be able to grow. Unfortunately this isone of the really hard truths of organic farming. Thanksfor your understanding, and strong thoughts for ournematode friends.
This Weeks Share:
 
Red Lettuce
 
Kale
 
Radish Greens
 
Baby Carrots
 
Garlic Scapes
 
Mint
 
Sage
UPCOMING EVENTS ON THE FARM:
Wednesday July 3:
 
FIRST FARMERS MARKET! 2:30-6:30pm
 
VOLUNTEER DAY & FARM OPEN, 2:30-6:30pm
Saturday July 6:
 
VOLUNTEER DAY, 10-2pm
 
WORKSHOP: Watering for Soil Health 2-3:30pmEver wonder whether your watering techniqueshave an effect on your soil health? Come to thisinteractive workshop to learn best practices formaintaining healthy soil and happy crops. We'llpractice watering techniques using a variety of implements commonly found used in NYC gardensand small farms.

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