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Veterans and Military Families Newsletter July 2013

Veterans and Military Families Newsletter July 2013

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Published by Matthew X. Hauser
Veterans and Military Families Newsletter July 2013
Veterans and Military Families Newsletter July 2013

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Published by: Matthew X. Hauser on Jun 26, 2013
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07/10/2013

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Paid for by the Michigan Republican Party with Regulated Funds.
 
 Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.
 
520 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI 48933
 
Veterans & MilitaryFamilies Monthly News
July 2013 Vol. 4 No. 7
In This Issue
P.4
-
Johnson Celebrates SpecialVeteran Designations on ID’s
 
P.5
-
France 4 Michigan D
-
Day
 
P.8
-
Story Corps
 
P.9
-
MI Military History
-
PostVietnam
 
P.11
-
3rd Annual Cpt. Jeff Haney Golf Scramble
 
P.13
-
VA Homefront
 
P.15
-
Honor Flight
 
P.17
-
Cpt. Frank Smith Part IX
 
P.22
-
Free Fishing and HuntingLicenses for Military Members
 
P.23
-
WWI MemorialFoundation
 
P.24
-
Hildenbrand tax relief legislation for disabled veterans passes Senate
 
P.25
-
Grasssroots Action Team
 
P.26
-
Thunder Over Michigan
 
P.27 Team Pascarella
 
P.29
-
Military and Veteran Af-fairs Committee
 
And much more…….
 
Good afternoon and thank you for reading, thismonth’s edition of the newsletter. We appreciate your involvement and continued support.
 
Remember, we have two online sources whereyou can read and offer comments on the current and previous editions of the newsletter. The newsletter is posted on Facebook through the group called
Veterans and Military Families Monthly News 
.”
Check it out and join the group.Click hereto go directly to the page. (Keep in mind, you need a Facebook account to join; however, the documents can be viewedthrough the docs link toward the bottom of the pageeven without an account.)The second source for the online version of thenewsletter is the websitewww.scribd.com.This online source for the newsletter works in the same fashion as theFacebook page.Please let us know what you think, or if you haveany questions about the online sources. For those of youwho enjoy just receiving the email each month, we willcontinue to send it out. But we want to build the online presence as a way to reach out to more people.As always, thank you very much for reading. Our hope is to continue to expand the newsletter. For that, weneed your input. So, again, if anyone has any suggestionsfor topics to cover or wants to write their own piece, wewill gladly try to work it in. We hope you enjoy, and please share your feedback with us.
 
Thank you very much!
21 Gun Salute
 From: Gene Simon ( www.about.com )
 
As a member of the Ft. Custer National Ceme-tery Honor Guard, I constantly receive questions aboutthe “21
-
Gun Salute”.
 
There has always been some con-fusion about the 21
-
Gun Salute vs. the rifle squad andthe volleys fired at a military funeral. This should clear it up for those that have questions.The practice of firing gun salutes has existed for centuries. Early warriors demonstrated their peacefulintentions by placing their weapons in a position thatrendered them ineffective. Apparently this custom wasuniversal, with the specific act varying with time and place, depending on the weapons being used. A NorthAfrican tribe, for example, trailed the points of their spears on the ground to indicate that they did not meanto be hostile. In early times, it was customary for a shipentering a friendly port to discharge its cannon todemonstrate that they were unloaded.
 
Continued. ..
 
 
We would like to express our appreciation to all of the fighting men and women in the United States Military.Thank you for your service to this country.
 
 
 
2
 
Paid for by the Michigan Republican Party with Regulated Funds.
 
 Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.
 
520 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI 48933
 
The tradition of rendering a salute by cannonoriginated in the 14th century as firearms and cannonscame into use. Since these early devices contained onlyone projectile, discharging them once rendered them inef-fective. Originally warships fired seven
-
gun salutes
--
thenumber seven probably selected because of its astrologi-cal and Biblical significance. Seven planets had beenidentified and the phases of the moon changed every sev-en days. The Bible states that God rested on the seventhday after Creation, that every seventh year was sabbaticaland that the seven times seventh year ushered in the Jubi-lee year.
 
Land batteries, having a greater supply of gun- powder, were able to fire three guns for every shot firedafloat, hence the salute by shore batteries was 21 guns.The multiple of three probably was chosen because of themystical significance of the number three in many ancientcivilizations. Early gunpowder, composed mainly of sodi-um nitrate, spoiled easily at sea, but could be kept cooler and drier in land magazines. When potassium nitrate im- proved the quality of gunpowder, ships at sea adopted thesalute of 21 guns.
 
For many years, the number of guns fired for var-ious purposes differed from country to country. By 1730,the Royal Navy was prescribing 21 guns for certain anni-versary dates, although this was not mandatory as a saluteto the Royal family until later in the eighteenth century.
 
Several famous incidents involving gun salutestook place during the American Revolution. On 16 No-vember 1776, the Continental Navy brigantine AndrewDoria, Captain Isaiah Robinson, fired a salute of 13 gunson entering the harbor of St. Eustatius in the West Indies(some accounts give 11 as the number). A few minuteslater, the salute was returned by 9 (or 11) guns by order of the Dutch governor of the island. At the time, a 13 gunsalute would have represented the 13 newly
-
formed Unit-ed States; the customary salute rendered to a republic atthat time was 9 guns. This has been called the "first sa-lute" to the American flag. About three weeks before,however, an American schooner had had her colors salut-ed at the Danish island of St. Croix. The flag flown by theAndrew Doria and the unnamed American schooner in1776 was not the Stars and Stripes, which had not yet been adopted. Rather, it was the Grand Union flag, con-sisting of thirteen alternating red and white stripes withthe British Jack in the union.
 
The first official salute by a foreign nation to theStars and Stripes took place on 14 February 1778, whenthe Continental Navy ship Ranger, Captain John PaulJones, fired 13 guns and received 9 in return from theFrench fleet anchored in Quiberon Bay, France.
 
The 21
-
gun salute became the highest honor anation rendered. Varying customs among the maritime powers led to confusion in saluting and return of salutes.Great Britain, the world's preeminent seapower in the 18thand 19th centuries, compelled weaker nations to salutefirst, and for a time monarchies received more guns thandid republics. Eventually, by agreement, the internationalsalute was established at 21 guns, although the UnitedStates did not agree on this procedure until August 1875.
 
The gun salute system of the United States haschanged considerably over the years. In 1810, the"national salute" was defined by the War Department asequal to the number of states in the Union
--
at that time17. This salute was fired by all U.S. military installationsat 1:00 p.m. (later at noon) on Independence Day. ThePresident also received a salute equal to the number of states whenever he visited a military installation.
 
The U.S. Navy regulations for 1818 were the firstto prescribe a specific manner for rendering gun salutes(although gun salutes were in use before the regulationswere written down). Those regulations required that"When the President shall visit a ship of the United States' Navy, he is to be saluted with 21 guns." It may be notedthat 21 was the number of states in the Union at that time.For a time thereafter, it became customary to offer a sa-lute of one gun for each state in the Union, although in practice there was a great deal of variation in the number of guns actually used in a salute.
 
 
 
3
 
Paid for by the Michigan Republican Party with Regulated Funds.
 
 Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.
 
520 Seymour Street, Lansing, MI 48933
 
We would like to express our appreciation to all of the fighting men and women in the United States Military.Thank you for your service to this country.
 
In addition to salutes offered to the President andheads of state, it was also a tradition in the U.S. Navy torender a "national salute" on 22 February (Washington'sBirthday) and 4 July (the anniversary of the Declarationof Independence).
 
A twenty
-
one gun salute for the President andheads of state, Washington's Birthday, and the Fourth of July became the standard in the United States Navy withthe issuance of new regulations on 24 May 1842. Thoseregulations laid out the specifics:
 
When the President of the United States shall visit a vessel of the navy, he shall be received with the follow-ing honors: The yards shall be manned, all the officers shall be on deck in full uniform, the full guard shall be paraded and present arms, the music shall play a march,and a salute of twenty
-
one guns shall be fired. He shall receive the same honors when he leaves the ship." Upon the anniversary of the Declaration of Inde- pendence of the United States, the colors shall be hoisted at sunrise, and all the vessels of the navy shall, when in port, be dressed, and so continue until the colors arehauled down at sunset, if the state of the weather and oth-er circumstances will allow it. At sunrise, at meridian,and at sunset, a salute of twenty
-
one guns shall be fired  from every vessel in commission mounting six guns and upwards." ”On the twenty
-
 second day of February, the anni-versary of the birth of Washington, a salute of twenty
-
one guns shall be fired at meridian from every vessel of thenavy in commission mounting six guns and upwards." 
Today, the national salute of 21 guns is fired inhonor of a national flag, the soverign or chief of state of aforeign nation, a member of a reigning royal family, andthe President, ex
-
President, and President
-
elect of theUnited States. It is also fired at noon of the day of the fu-neral of a President, ex
-
President, or President
-
elect, onWashington's Birthday, Presidents Day, and the Fourth of July. On Memorial Day, a salute of 21 minute guns isfired at noon while the flag is flown at half mast. Fiftyguns are also fired on all military installations equipped todo so at the close of the day of the funeral of a President,ex
-
President, or President
-
elect.
 
Gun salutes are also rendered to other militaryand civilian leaders of this and other nations. The number of guns is based on their protocol rank. These salutes arealways in odd numbers. For example, the Vice Presidentof the United States, Secretary Defense, and Secretaries of the Army, Air Force, and Navy all rate 19 guns. The high-est
-
ranking generals in the services (Commadant of theMarine Corps, Chief of Naval Operations, and the Armyand Air Force Chief of Staffs) all rate 17 guns. Other 4
-
star generals and admirals rate 17 guns. Three
-
stars rate15, two
-
stars rate 13, and one
-
stars rate 11.
 
At military funerals, one often sees three volleysof shots fired in honor of the deceased veteran. This isoften mistaken by the laymen as a 21
-
gun salute, althoughit is entirely different (in the military, a "gun" is a large
-
calibered weapon. The three volleys are fired from"rifles," not "guns." Therefore, the three volleys isn't anykind of "gun salute," at all).
 
Anyone who is entitled to a military funeral(generally anyone who dies on active duty, honorably dis-charged veterans, and military retirees) are to the threerifle volleys, subject to availability of honor guard teams.As I said, this is not a 21
-
gun salute, nor any other type of "gun salute." They are simply three rifle volleys fired. Thefiring team can consist of any number, but one usuallysees a team of eight, with a noncommissioned officer incharge of the firing detail. Whether the team consists of three or eight, or ten, each member fires three times (threevolleys).
 
The three volleys comes from an old battlefieldcustom. The two warring sides would cease hostilities toclear their dead from the battlefield, and the firing of threevolleys meant that the dead had been properly cared for and the side was ready to resume the battle.
 
The flag detail often slips three shell
-
casings intothe folded flag before presenting the flag to the family.Each casing represents one volley.
 
 Much of the above information compiled from the Naval Historical Society and the Army Center of Military History
 
Veterans Radio is dedicated to all of the menand women who have served or are currentlyserving in the armed forces of the United Statesof America. Our mission is to provide all veter-ans with a voice, to give them a forum where they are able to discuss their issues…and tell their stories. You canlisten to the show on: WDEO (990
-
AM Ann Arbor/Detroit), WMAX (1440
-
AM, Saginaw), WDEO
-
FM (99.5 FM, Naples FL), KAGY (1510
-
AM Port Sulfur/New Orleans LA), KIXW (960
-
AM, Apple Valley CA) and KMRC (1430
-
AM Morgan City, LA). Or, listen to our Webcast and archives at:www.veteransradio.net.
 

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