Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Understanding the Civil War

Understanding the Civil War

Ratings: (0)|Views: 42 |Likes:
Published by carry2109
Essay about the Civil War.
Essay about the Civil War.

More info:

Published by: carry2109 on May 06, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/01/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Understandingthe Civil War
Michael W. O’Brien
 
Understanding
the Civil War
Michael W. O’Brien
Table of Contents
Introduction
.................................................... 2
The Road to War
............................................ 2
How They Fought
........................................ 10
The War in the East
..................................... 13
The War in the West
.................................... 32
The Political War in the North
................... 45
The Political War in the South
................... 49
The Generals - Union
.................................. 51
The Generals - Confederate
........................ 57
Conclusion
.................................................... 64
Editors Note
-
Understanding the Civil War
is rather unorthodox in its ap-proach to the Civil War. First of all, it presents the military action without
including the names of the ofcers in charge; the ofcers are presented atthe end of the book. The author rmly believes that it is easier to unde
-stand what happened before learning who made it happen. Secondly, mostbooks on the Civil War cover the events in chronological order. This book separates the political war from the military war and further separates themilitary war in the East from the military war in the West. While this ap-proach might seem unusual to the academic, the result is a Civil War primerthat is surprisingly easy to understand.
 
Introduction
The Civil War has captured the imagination of the American peoplelike no other event in American history. 65,000 books have been writtenon the subject. The biggest reason for this fascination is the size of thecatastrophe. 620,000 soldiers died in the Civil War. What could push anation into such a bloody calamity? Some historians argue that by 1860the northern and southern sections of the United States had become verydifferent societies. Others argue that, when factors like common languageand common history are considered, the similarities outweigh the differ-ences. Whoever is right, one fact remains. Northerners and Southerners
thought they were different, and they were willing to ght about that differ 
-
ence whether it was real or imagined. Southerners thought they were ght
-ing the American Revolution all over again. As they saw it, the North hadno right to tyrannize the South just as Britain had no right to tyrannize theAmerican Colonists. Just as the North was playingthe part of Britain, Abraham Lincoln was playingthe part of the tyrant King George III. Southerners
were ghting for the right to self government, as
were the American Colonists. The difference was
the type of government for which they were ght
-ing. The Confederate States of America not onlyexcluded 4 million black Americans from the citi-zenship, they held them in slavery. During the war,the Northern states decided that destroying this type
of government was worth the ght.
The Road to War
Slavery has been associated with civilization since the beginning of recorded human history. Household slavery was the most common form. Inhousehold slavery, wealthy individuals in many societies brought slaves intotheir homes to help with the domestic chores. These slaves added little to theoverall wealth of the society and were often sought after as status symbolsfor the well off. Household slaves often had extensive rights. Householdslaves never represented more that 20% of any society. In 1050, 10% of thepopulation of England were household slaves. The other form of slavery,productive slavery, was rather rare and much more severe. In productiveslavery, ways were found to put slaves to work producing products that madethe society wealthy. Societies organized in such a manner were made up of at least 20-30% slaves, and they spent much of the societies’ energy getting
and keeping slaves. The rst major slave society was Greece. In 400 BC,
 Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln
2

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->