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The Most Necessary Thing

The Most Necessary Thing

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Published by glennpease
BY EDWARD LEIGH PELL
BY EDWARD LEIGH PELL

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Published by: glennpease on Jun 27, 2013
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06/27/2013

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The Most ecessary Thing
BY EDWARD LEIGH PELL
' Let us now think of little while, in thischapter and in those which follow, aboutsome of the things which have to do withour well being. First we will think of faith. We place faith foremost not becauseit is the greatest thing in the world, for itis not, but because it is the fundamentalthing — the most necessary thing. The won-derful achievements of faith and the highestimate which our Lord placed upon ithave given it an air of mystery, and it isnot an uncommon notion that there issomething magical about it. Yet one hasonly to put himself for a moment in theplace which Jesus occupies in the presenceof one who has appealed to him for help^ — as, for example, the leper, or the centurion — to see that it is not mysterious at all,and that its apparently magical power isthe most natural power in the world.For faith is the point at which weaknesstakes hold of strength. A little child standstefore me. She is very beautiful; she iswinsome; she is good; she has manycharming traits. But the little thing is in•distress and she has come to me for help.And she appeals to me in a way that showsthat she has the utmost confidence not onlyin my power to help her, but in my wil-lingness to help her. She has come trust-ing me implicitly. ow, what do I see inthis child? What is the thing that gets
 
liold of my heart and draws me to her? Isit her beauty? her winsome ways? hergoodness? Is it not the fact that she is28 The Life Worth Whiletrusting me? And it makes little differ-ence what she asks — I will go through fireand flood rather than that she should trustme in vain."Like as a father pitieth his children, sothe Lord pitieth them that fear him." Mentalk of the unreasonableness of faith, butwhat is more reasonable than that Godshould be touched by the cry of those whotrust in him? I do not say that this is allthere is in faith, but this is enough to ac-count for its drawing power. If you and Iwill answer the appeal of faith that comesto us from another man's child, how muchmore will our Father in heaven answer theappeals of faith which his own childrenmake to him!I have said that faith is the most naturalpower in the world. And it is the mostnecessary power. It is the motive powerthat runs the world. Without faith thewheels of the world would stand still. WeThe MoSt ecessary Tiling 29never do anything without faith except inour insane moments when we are movedby sheer animal impulse. Take faith out
 
of tire world and there would be no life;there would be only stagnation, cold boil-ers, dead wires, death. Take faith out of business and there would be a world-panicas soon as the wires could carry the news.Take faith out of the home and you wouldhave left — perdition. Take faith out of so-ciety and every man would snatch up hisgun and take to the woods, each seekingsome retreat in which he could barricadehimself against the whole world. The thingthat makes the world beautiful and happyis love. But the thing that makes the worldendurable is faith. Faith is the most neces-sary thing in the world.Perhaps there is no grander spectacle inall ancient history than that of Abram theChaldean leaving home and friends, and atthe command of heaven striking out across30 The Life Worth Whilethe country for an unknown land with noassurance that he would ever have a homeagain — ^striking out through the dark ''notknowing whither he went." It is the grand-eur of courage, we say sometimes; andagain, the grandeur of implicit obedience.But no, it is the grandeur of faith; for itwas his faith that gave him the courage andthe will to obey.That picture of the father of the faithfuloverwhelms us like a glimpse of a greatmountain. We feel small. We feel soweak. There are two things we are alwayscrying out for — courage to obey, and the

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