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P. 1
THE PRODIGAL SON.— No. I.

THE PRODIGAL SON.— No. I.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE

BY REV. OCTAVIUS PERINCHIEF



Luke 15; 11, 13, 13.— And He eald, a cer tail, man had two sons, and tbe
younger of tbem enid to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods
that falletli to me, and He divided unto them His living. And not many
daja after, the younger son gathered all together, and tooli his JDurnej into
a far country, niid there wasted iijs substance with riotous living.

BY REV. OCTAVIUS PERINCHIEF



Luke 15; 11, 13, 13.— And He eald, a cer tail, man had two sons, and tbe
younger of tbem enid to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods
that falletli to me, and He divided unto them His living. And not many
daja after, the younger son gathered all together, and tooli his JDurnej into
a far country, niid there wasted iijs substance with riotous living.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Jun 29, 2013
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05/14/2014

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THE PRODIGAL SO.— o. I.BY REV. OCTAVIUS PERICHIEFLuke 15; 11, 13, 13.— And He eald, a cer tail, man had two sons, and tbeyounger of tbem enid to his father, Father, give me the portion of goodsthat falletli to me, and He divided unto them His living. And not manydaja after, the younger son gathered all together, and tooli his JDurnej intoa far country, niid there wasted iijs substance with riotous living.This parable of the Prodigal Son, is the third of a veryremarkable series. The three form a constellation uponwhich the eyes of eighteen hundred years have rested,with all the emotions of joy and hope. The three areso many parts of one discourse. The thought in themall is the same. Each one only increases its degree.Perhaps, within so small a compass, there never beforewas so much taught. This chapter embraces, in acertain sense, the whole Gospel in itself. 3'Ae burdenof it is, the love of God for all His children — a love aboveall loves, the one thing which, be life what it ma^, it alonenever dies. Around the thought is woven every con-ceivable circumstance of aggravation or unworthiness,on our part — that the Fatherhood of God may stand outsupreme and absolute. That it was intended to teach.That it does teach. All else is only accessory. On acertain occasion, Christ said He had not come to con-demn the world, but to save the world. That seems tohave been the one yearning, burning thought of all Hislife, and it is worth while to observe here how sponta-neoush/ it gushes from His warm and sympathetic heart.In these parables there is nothing of learned elabora-tion. They are as simple as the utterances of a child.There was no time for premeditation — but their graspis infinite. It embraces God, and time, and the humanrace.The parables were a response to the Scribes and Phari-sees. We must recollect that, or we shall miss muchof their meaning. The Scribes and Pharisees had foundfault with Him for receiving sinners, and communingwith them. These parables were the instant reply.They as much as say, what else should I do ? Whocan need my help as much as they ? What would asalvation be, which deserted us in exact proportion as
 
it was needed? That, surely, would be a human wayof doing things — of loving those who love us, a sd by GoogleTBS PRODIGAL SO— o. I. legway, not imparting blessing, but valuing people becausewe could of them receive blessing — being kind as longas they did not need the kindness. But that is notGod's way. God does not look upon sin so much as afault, as a misfortune. Of all things in the universe, itis the unnatural thing, the undesirable thing, on bothsides. It is that thing which disturbs all relations,and defeats all purpose. Man was made for God. Athousand divine objects are contemplated in man's exist-ence. An abstract existence, an existence just for him-self, even if it were possible, would make him fall short of all design, and therefore, not fulfil his existence, notunfold his being. God is thus interested. Hie affec-tions, His sympathies are enlisted. If a man lose asheep, it is the lost one he must go after. If a womanlose a piece of money, it is the lost piece she must beoccupied about, till she find it. If a father lose a son,it is that son his heart follows, till he return. Thequestion now is, not at all about any desert in the lost,whether it did right or did wrong, voluntarily or invol-untarily, there is loss. The question is wholly as tothe owner, the Creator, the Father. What is He?What is His nature ? Can He help ? Will He help ?Would it be worth while to have a Shepherd, if Hecould afford no aid ? Would the coin exist if it had novalue ? Would it be a coin without an image and super-scription ? Would a father be a father, if he did notlove ? Would there be any evidence of a superiornature, if, able to help. He still refused ? View Godas the mere possessor of beings, which He has gatheredfor His own selfish purposes, or as a Father exercisingaffection, endowed with all the attributes of love — viewman as having nothing, whatever, in common with God,
 
d by Google170 SERMOS.or as having merely a sort of divine stamp upon him,or as endowed with the same nature, and possessed of faculties and yearnings, exactly responsive to those of a Pather — still, in either case, you must see how it is,of necessity, the lost, sick, erring one, for whom Godcares.I ask you to take particular notice of these thoughts.They are peculiar to Christ. We Christians do not, orat any rate, did not always understand them. In theface of the Gospel, where the questions of total de-pravity and original sin came from, is ineoneeivahle.The Gospel is the ^^ good news" of restoration, the call tous to come home. It presupposes the thing Christ pre-supposes in these parables — a right to us that God has.That right is now twofold — first, by creation, second,by redemption. It asks for the third, the right by ourvolition. It presupposes in us, an adaptation, first, toGod's purposes, as the sheep and money are contem-plated in our economy, and second, a participation of nature, and consequent responsiveness, as a child to aparent. When God made us, as the rest of all Hisworks, so we were very good. If we lost in Adamthe divine image, then in Christ it was restored. Weare all children, God's own beloved children, partici-pating His nature, germinally it is true, but still actu-ally having parts and faculties contemplated in thedivine life, and intended for the divine life ; made inGod's image, employed in any other life, their objectutterly defeated, and their possessor utterly a wreck,existence a burden, the soul, made to be a conscious joy, turned into one undying remorse. But, if it be inany other life, it must be there by its own act. If itgo from God, it must go in spite of God's remonstrance,d by Google

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